Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-20-02, 09:39 AM   #1
Richard D
Donating member
Thread Starter
 
Richard D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Faversham, Kent, UK
Bikes:
Posts: 1,852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Re-spraying a bike, the lazy way.

I'm off work for a few days in two weeks, and I plan on respraying the folding Raleigh twenty, I mentioned in an earlier thread.

The plan is to strip down as little as possible, but use plenty of masking tape...

For the headset badge, I was thinking of painting on melted wax as protection - this should work shouldn't it?

I'll be spraying indoors (un-used spare room with window open), probably using sprat enamel after keying the surface with fine emery paper.

Any tips? - I'm not expecting a pro-finish, but hope to get it looking half-decent.

Richard

Oh - and will dark green or dark blue show off the newly polished chrome better ?
__________________
Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)
Richard D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-02, 10:59 AM   #2
ljbike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Bikes:
Posts: 1,049
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Richard, go for the green. Isn't that British racing colors? And with that new paint job I'm sure you'll be racing to work to show it off.

The wax idea sounds doable but I've never tried it; in fact I've never heard of it. Masking areas with tape often leaves a ridge of paint where the tape was. I've never figured out how to feather that out. Maybe there are some experienced painters that will comment.

Are you using a spray gun or a spray can? Sparay cans put the paint on so thin that you allmost need a dozen coats to get a decent looking finish.
__________________
ljbike
ljbike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-02, 11:05 AM   #3
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sounds like your short-cuts are going to make a mess.

Go to www.oldroads.com or www.schwinn.com (look for the restoration forums) and get some tips from guys that refurbish bikes.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 04:26 AM   #4
Richard D
Donating member
Thread Starter
 
Richard D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Faversham, Kent, UK
Bikes:
Posts: 1,852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks - the bike only cost 15, so it's not the end of the world if it's not a stunning finish.

Richard
__________________
Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)
Richard D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 07:38 AM   #5
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 16,943
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Since it's not that difficult to disassemble the bike completely, I strongly recommend that approach over masking.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 07:41 AM   #6
Richard D
Donating member
Thread Starter
 
Richard D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Faversham, Kent, UK
Bikes:
Posts: 1,852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by John E
Since it's not that difficult to disassemble the bike completely, I strongly recommend that approach over masking.
It was the fear of my first attempt at dealing with cottered cranks that was scaring me Brakes, gear cables and so forth I'm happy with, but those cranks look scary...

Richard
__________________
Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)
Richard D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 10:40 AM   #7
ljbike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Bikes:
Posts: 1,049
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cottered are not difficult. There are three ways to do it: the right way, the wrong way, and my way. Actually there is a special clamp that does the job in a minute and most of the older mechanics have one. You can make one with a couple pieces of wood and a strong C clamp. Drill a hole in one piece so that it fits over the top of the cotter and place the other one on the nutted end --after backing the nut off a few turns. Put the clamp on and squeeze. It will take a lot of pressure to get them out of there. The other way is to pound on the loosened nut with with a hand maul. (You have to decide which is the right way and which is the wrong way.) Good luck.
__________________
ljbike
ljbike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 12:49 PM   #8
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Richard D


It was the fear of my first attempt at dealing with cottered cranks that was scaring me Brakes, gear cables and so forth I'm happy with, but those cranks look scary...

Richard
Leave the cottered cranks alone. It isn't worth the hassle of befuggling them up if they don't come off nicely.

Cottered cranks are a royal pain in the asss.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-02, 01:16 PM   #9
ljbike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Bikes:
Posts: 1,049
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The cotter pins should still be available at about $0.50 cents US if you decide to try extracting them --sounds like pulling teeth and can be almost as difficult at times-- and they get knackered. (Is that the right English word for bent, screwed-up, made useless?)

There is another option, you know; remove the old cranks, throw them away and install cotterless cranks.
__________________
ljbike
ljbike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-02, 02:49 PM   #10
stumpjumper
Lagomorph Demonicus
 
stumpjumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Dayton, Ohio, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Leave the cottered cranks alone. It isn't worth the hassle of befuggling them up if they don't come off nicely.
...until your unlubed bb bearings come to a grinding halt and you are befuggled worse than before!



Easy way to remove cotters w/o ruining them:

1. Spray with a penetrating lube.
2. Go inside, have a beer.
3. wipe off crankarm, and fit an old sock over the bb end
4. Carefuly apply a set of vice-grips on the edge of the crankset and the threaded side of the cotter so as to put a constant pressure in the correct direction.
5. Go inside, have a beer. Play Playststion2 for 30 min.
6. Return to garage, check vice grips. If the cotter has popped loose, it should have fallen inside the sock. If it has not come loose, adjust vicegrip tension as needed, then return to step 5.

Either this works, or you get drunk doing it. I only remember waking up on my garage floor with a pair of vice grips hanging from my earlobe and a bad hangover the last time I tried this.

Last edited by stumpjumper; 05-23-02 at 02:52 PM.
stumpjumper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-02, 04:17 PM   #11
Mikew305
Senior Citizen
 
Mikew305's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Coral Gables, FL (USA)
Bikes:
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
weird....i woke up the same exact way this morning, except i was at a party last night...

Mikew305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-02, 04:36 PM   #12
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by stumpjumper
...until your unlubed bb bearings come to a grinding halt and you are befuggled worse than before!



Easy way to remove cotters w/o ruining them:

4. Carefuly apply a set of vice-grips on the edge of the crankset and the threaded side of the cotter so as to put a constant pressure in the correct direction.
This sounds intrigueing. I have suffered through many a cotter that would not come loose for ANYTHING.

Stumpjumper, can you post a scanned sketch or pic of what you are talking about here? I am VERY interested in giving it a try.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-02, 10:47 PM   #13
Richard D
Donating member
Thread Starter
 
Richard D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Faversham, Kent, UK
Bikes:
Posts: 1,852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Due to family commitments and almost constant rain, I didn't get round to sanding the bike down this holiday, it's going to be a weekend job soon. I did buy the paint though - Lawn Green, so I'm going to have to name the bike 'Galactica' or 'Bonanza'

Richard
__________________
Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)
Richard D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 02:28 AM   #14
unrelated
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Spraying it yourself is never a good idea unless you are a pro.

People here spray their bikes and scooters to prevent theft, cus they will look so ugly.

Anyway, all the best to your adventure adn although I am not a Christian, I will pray for your bike
unrelated is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 02:31 AM   #15
unrelated
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
BTW, you know that hologram-like paint that Klein bikes use a lot? My dad makes it. Too bad that it if will take too many layers to look good on a light colored base, or else I will have it on my bike long ago. Now I am just trying if it will look good on my helmet
unrelated is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 05:29 AM   #16
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
By the way, if you don't have much time to paint, remember the 'Mr. Bean' approach to painting.

Did you see the show where he covers all his furniture with newspaper, puts a GIANT fircracker in a bucket of paint, lights the fuse, and then leaves the room?

That is a hilarious show.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 06:19 AM   #17
chewa
The Flying Scot
 
chewa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North Queensferry Scotland and London (and France)
Bikes: Custom (Colin Laing) 531c fast tourer/audax, 1964 Flying Scot Continental, 1995 Cinelli Supercorsa, Holdsworth Mistral single speed, Dahon Speed 6 (folder), Micmo Sirocco and a few more
Posts: 1,902
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Richard D
Lawn Green, so I'm going to have to name the bike 'Galactica' or 'Bonanza'

Richard
Subtle, but very funny.
__________________
plus je vois les hommes, plus j'admire les chiens

1985 Sandy Gilchrist-Colin Laing built 531c Audax/fast tourer.
1964 Flying Scot Continental (531)
1995 Cinelli Supercorsa (Columbus SLX)
1980s Holdsworth Mistral fixed (531)
2005 Dahon Speed 6 (folder)
(YES I LIKE STEEL)
2008 Viking Saratoga tandem
2008 Micmo Sirocco Hybrid (aluminium!)
2012 BTwin Rockrider 8.1
chewa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 07:47 AM   #18
Ellie
Dazed and confused
 
Ellie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Cambridge UK
Bikes: Trek 1000, Kona Caldera, Raleigh Record ("Rusty"), Tiger Foldaway ("Cub")
Posts: 319
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by unrelated

People here spray their bikes and scooters to prevent theft, cus they will look so ugly.
I've done a couple of bikes and they don't look too bad. Just take your time, and wait the 24 hours between undercoat and main coat. An undercoat is really important. Granted they never look quite as good as the original, but it's a good cheap alternative.

I'm also a believer in waxing the paint afterwards. Dunno how much it really helps, but it certainly doesn't hurt.

Ellie
Ellie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-02, 08:23 AM   #19
unrelated
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Ellie


I've done a couple of bikes and they don't look too bad. Just take your time, and wait the 24 hours between undercoat and main coat. An undercoat is really important. Granted they never look quite as good as the original, but it's a good cheap alternative.

I'm also a believer in waxing the paint afterwards. Dunno how much it really helps, but it certainly doesn't hurt.

Ellie
What I meant is people do it on purpose to prevent theft. Like my cusin was mad at his dad because he sprayed her new bike in random order to prevent theft. Of course I am talking about cheap ones. We never leave our bike alone outside cus it's not as safe.
unrelated is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:24 PM.