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Old 12-02-13, 11:19 AM   #51
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Old 12-03-13, 01:10 PM   #52
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BTW, when I spoke of powdercoating earlier, I was going on what I'd read on the Internet, and not experience. I just learned of a place near me that works with the local bike rehab/co-op place. They do frames for $45. I suspect that doesn't include removing the old finish, but you've already done that to yours. Also, they can do metallics and candies now (though perhaps not for $45). You might see if you have a local powdercoater and have them quote you.
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Old 12-04-13, 05:01 AM   #53
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BTW, when I spoke of powdercoating earlier, I was going on what I'd read on the Internet, and not experience. I just learned of a place near me that works with the local bike rehab/co-op place. They do frames for $45. I suspect that doesn't include removing the old finish, but you've already done that to yours. Also, they can do metallics and candies now (though perhaps not for $45). You might see if you have a local powdercoater and have them quote you.
That's heartening. Thanks.
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Old 12-06-13, 09:50 AM   #54
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I didn't have the tool to pop out those bearing cups in the head set (what's that tool called again - basically 4 spreading prongs you hit with a hammer?), but the bike shop did it in seconds for no charge. So I've finally got ALL the parts off and am detail cleaning the paint off. Tedious work, but the little dremel (Craftsman)- type tool with the right attachments is helping a lot. Think I'll try to call around to a couple of local autobody shops today to see if they'd mind painting a bicycle frame.
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Old 12-06-13, 11:14 AM   #55
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I didn't have the tool to pop out those bearing cups in the head set (what's that tool called again - basically 4 spreading prongs you hit with a hammer?)...
I call it a "screwdriver and a hammer". My re-installation tool is called a "piece of all-thread, two nuts and some washers".
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Old 12-06-13, 01:25 PM   #56
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I call it a "screwdriver and a hammer". My re-installation tool is called a "piece of all-thread, two nuts and some washers".
Yes, this was a very common removal technique before "rocket tools" were available at reasonable cost. Use a long shaft screwdriver or a brass or steel punch and a hammer and work slowly around the circumference of each cup so it comes out evenly.
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Old 12-06-13, 03:13 PM   #57
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I call it a "screwdriver and a hammer". My re-installation tool is called a "piece of all-thread, two nuts and some washers".
Good for you. With your years of experience, I suspect you can use that hammer and screwdriver to remove bearing races without damage. Here is what the LBS mechanic used. Took awhile, though . . . about 1.5 seconds per cup. :-)


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Old 12-06-13, 03:21 PM   #58
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Hmmm...might have to get one of those. They don't call me the_tool_man for nothing.
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Old 12-06-13, 03:29 PM   #59
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...You might see if you have a local powdercoater and have them quote you.
My frame at the body shop has taken a lot longer than I thought it would. So, toying with the idea of pulling it back and taking it to the powdercoater, I called and asked some questions. They said the cost ranges from $25 - $55, depending primarily upon color and effect desired. Single-coat solid colors are less expensive than two-stage finishes, like metallics or fades. Two-week turnaround. This assumes the frame arrives COMPLETELY stripped and clean. Otherwise, they bead blast for an extra fee (I didn't ask how much, as I'm sure it varies).

Not trying to talk you out of paint. Just thought the information might be useful for someone.
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Old 12-06-13, 04:14 PM   #60
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Hmmm...might have to get one of those. They don't call me the_tool_man for nothing.
Unless you plan on removing or replacing a goodly number headsets on older bikes that would be more decoration than tool.
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Old 12-06-13, 04:45 PM   #61
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Unless you plan on removing or replacing a goodly number headsets on older bikes that would be more decoration than tool.
Nashbar sells a decent one and I bought mine on sale for about $15 so it paid for itself with two headsets and I didn't have to drive anywhere to have the job done. We tend to forget the cost of driving to and from a bike shop is part of the cost of any work we have done.
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Old 12-06-13, 05:53 PM   #62
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Unless you plan on removing or replacing a goodly number headsets on older bikes that would be more decoration than tool.
It was a joke. As inexpensive as it is, I already have a hammer and screwdriver.
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Old 12-06-13, 06:30 PM   #63
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looks alot better than my 78 when i found it
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Old 01-02-14, 07:39 PM   #64
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UPDATE: Well, I've got all the paint stripped off the frame and fork. Took it to Palms Cyles in Los Angeles this afternoon. They'll powdercoat and clear coat it for $150. Expensive in the Midwest; not so expensive in southern California. I've also ordered the "NISHIKI" decals from Velocal.

Meantime, I'm cleaning up the various parts. The front derailleur is apparently shot; see photo below. Does anyone know of a source for a new one? The old one says "Suntour" and "Spirt" on the side of the cage. I believe this type is called a "high normal" derailleur, but I'm not sure. Thanks - this is a 1980 Nishiki Sport with a 7-speed rear sprocket and hub assembly.
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Old 01-02-14, 10:08 PM   #65
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"Sprint" was one of Sun Tours lower-mid line component groups. I think Sun Tour played around with high-normal (spring loaded toward the largest chainring) fds for awhile but they were unusual even for Sun Tour. The idea was that both the front and rear shifters moved the same way to accomplish up or down shifts. However, you are unlikely to find one and there is no real advantage if you do.

If you have friction front shifting just about any current road front derailleur with the proper clamp diameter will do.
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Old 01-02-14, 11:21 PM   #66
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"Sprint" was one of Sun Tours lower-mid line component groups. I think Sun Tour played around with high-normal (spring loaded toward the largest chainring) fds for awhile but they were unusual even for Sun Tour. The idea was that both the front and rear shifters moved the same way to accomplish up or down shifts. However, you are unlikely to find one and there is no real advantage if you do.

If you have friction front shifting just about any current road front derailleur with the proper clamp diameter will do.
The FD cage is stamped "SunTour", and then "Spirt." Not "Spirit", or "Sprint," but "Spirt." You can look it up.
Changing to a low normal isn't a challenge except for the cable stops; there are none.
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Old 01-03-14, 07:10 AM   #67
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From Sheldon:

"Another interesting part came in 1966, Sun Tour's Spirt (not Sprint, or Spirit) front derailleur. It was a "top normal" derailleur, in that you move the lever opposite the usual direction to shift up or down. Thus both shift levers move the chain to a higher gear when pressed forward. Apparently the Spirt was produced for some time."
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Old 01-03-14, 08:03 AM   #68
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If you have friction front shifting
Everything on a bike works together. Back in the says when men were men and all bike frames were steel you could mix and match pretty much with impunity. That's not so true today. Source your shifters first because they'll affect your other component choices.
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Old 01-03-14, 09:03 AM   #69
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The FD cage is stamped "SunTour", and then "Spirt." Not "Spirit", or "Sprint," but "Spirt." You can look it up.
Changing to a low normal isn't a challenge except for the cable stops; there are none.
I wonder if the mis-spelling was the result of the Japanese not transliterating the English words "sprint" or "spirit" correctly. I once had a Hozan bottom bracket lock ring tool with the words "Rock Ring" cast into the handle.

Anyway, as I mentioned in your other thread, you don't need any cable stops to use a standard low normal bottom pull front derailleur.
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Old 01-03-14, 12:47 PM   #70
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I wonder if the mis-spelling was the result of the Japanese not transliterating the English words "sprint" or "spirit" correctly. I once had a Hozan bottom bracket lock ring tool with the words "Rock Ring" cast into the handle. [snip]
"Rock Ring." Gotta love it. Thanks for the tip on the switching out the FD also.
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Old 01-04-14, 09:50 PM   #71
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The frame, stripped of paint, was taken to Palms Cycles in Los Angeles yesterday. $150 for powder coat and finish clear coat.
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Old 01-05-14, 09:51 AM   #72
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Does that shop do frame repairs and/or modifications? If so you might have them braze on downtube shifter bosses before they powder coat it. I had this done to an '85 Bridgestone frame that originally had clamp-on dt shifters and it opened up a whole world of shifter options.
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Old 01-05-14, 10:28 AM   #73
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:-) What an odd statement. I posted a few initial photos of the project, and was immediately hit with a battery of disapproval ("It's not worth any thing," "don't waste your time or money," "it's a crap bike,", etc). The point of my response is exactly the same as yours: I WILL do what I want for the reasons stated above . . . and no one's approval is required. Someone - maybe not me - will be happy with the end product. In the meantime, constructive criticism and advice on the restoration is very much appreciated. There is a lot of knowledge here and it has already provided great value. Thank you all.

This morning, we'll start stripping the frame of the old paint:

Hey Duane,

Yeah, there's some who don't have people skills, but mostly it's a great bunch.

As far as your Nishiki project goes, looks like you've got a good base to start with, better components than the '86 Nishiki Rally I paid $60 for. Mine was one step up from the bottom level bike, had this stamped steel chainring that was junk and bent, had cheap stem shifters, okay brakes and levers. The frame was in good shape and needed no repainting. My project work was looking in my parts bin and pulling out an old SuperMaxy alloy crankset, a set of high-polished Dia-Compe brakes that had the quick-release mechanism, an old set of Weinmann levers that had the drilled pattern, a clamp-on down-tube shifter to replace the cheap stem shifters, and a longer-reach alloy stem. Some new cables for $7, one rear bearing set for $7, bar tape for $9, new gumwall tires for $30, and a lot of cleanup and re-lubing.

Total cost to me for a bike that fits me and rides well, looks great, and I'm happy to own - $113. To be honest, I'd never repaint a frame, I like the character of the nicks and dings, kind of like an old well-broken-in seat. Get the rust off, touch up the worst spots, shine up the shiny stuff, clean and lube. That's what I do with them.

Good luck with your project, It's a good base to start with, far as I'm concerned. I liked it like you got it.
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Old 01-05-14, 05:35 PM   #74
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Does that shop do frame repairs and/or modifications? If so you might have them braze on downtube shifter bosses before they powder coat it. I had this done to an '85 Bridgestone frame that originally had clamp-on dt shifters and it opened up a whole world of shifter options.
Too late - it's already at the painters. But I like the idea and will hold it in the memory bank for the next project. Thanks much. DB
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Old 01-05-14, 05:36 PM   #75
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Hey Duane,

Yeah, there's some who don't have people skills, but mostly it's a great bunch.

As far as your Nishiki project goes, looks like you've got a good base to start with, better components than the '86 Nishiki Rally I paid $60 for. Mine was one step up from the bottom level bike, had this stamped steel chainring that was junk and bent, had cheap stem shifters, okay brakes and levers. The frame was in good shape and needed no repainting. My project work was looking in my parts bin and pulling out an old SuperMaxy alloy crankset, a set of high-polished Dia-Compe brakes that had the quick-release mechanism, an old set of Weinmann levers that had the drilled pattern, a clamp-on down-tube shifter to replace the cheap stem shifters, and a longer-reach alloy stem. Some new cables for $7, one rear bearing set for $7, bar tape for $9, new gumwall tires for $30, and a lot of cleanup and re-lubing.

Total cost to me for a bike that fits me and rides well, looks great, and I'm happy to own - $113. To be honest, I'd never repaint a frame, I like the character of the nicks and dings, kind of like an old well-broken-in seat. Get the rust off, touch up the worst spots, shine up the shiny stuff, clean and lube. That's what I do with them.

Good luck with your project, It's a good base to start with, far as I'm concerned. I liked it like you got it.
I'm having a serious case of parts-bin envy here. . . . :-) Good job.
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