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Old 03-13-05, 11:20 AM   #1
KrisPistofferson
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Am I high on Crack?

I was gonna learn how to build a wheel by building a wheel, and I'm thinking of using MTB hubs, which will require some "cold setting", allegedly. But isn't this like swatting a fly with a sledgehammer? Couldn't this problem be solved by lock nuts that were a couple millimeters thinner and/or track nuts? Am I missing something? I've got a steel frame, and I can flex it out to 135-140mm with my hands easily, so is cold setting necessary with a flexy enough frame? Thank you everybody in advance for the generous replies, unless, of course, no one does!
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Old 03-13-05, 11:32 AM   #2
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Not sure if you are high on crack. That sound like a personal issue on which you need to work.

Just to clarify, are you building this wheel to use on a road bike? Is the current spacing 130mm or 126mm?

It depends, since your stays open so easily, maybe you do not need to cold set. I've used 130mm hubs on several older steel frames with 126mm dropouts with no problems at all.
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Old 03-13-05, 11:40 AM   #3
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depends on the spacing. if the rear triangle is 130, you shouldn't have too much problem. if the rear triangle is 126, you're probably also fine. the only issue might be that the derailler hanger migh become skewed outwards with too much flexing. this can be cold set (read: bent) as well, but this is more difficult.

smaller locknuts couldn't hurt, but track nuts have nothing to do with this. track nuts are a fancy kind of axle nut.

also: crack cocaine is an excellent stimulant for a bicycle mechanic
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Old 03-13-05, 12:12 PM   #4
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Why don't you make the wheel fit the frame rather than worry about making the frame fit the wheel?

Whenever I relace a used hub, I overhaul the hub first. I take it apart clean everything, regrease the bearings and reassemble everything. While you are doing this, look for a 5mm thick washer on the left side and leave it out when you put everything beck together again. You'll probably have to shorten the axle or use a shorter axle.
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Old 03-13-05, 12:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krispistoferson
I was gonna learn how to build a wheel by building a wheel, and I'm thinking of using MTB hubs, which will require some "cold setting", allegedly. But isn't this like swatting a fly with a sledgehammer? Couldn't this problem be solved by lock nuts that were a couple millimeters thinner and/or track nuts? Am I missing something? I've got a steel frame, and I can flex it out to 135-140mm with my hands easily, so is cold setting necessary with a flexy enough frame? Thank you everybody in advance for the generous replies, unless, of course, no one does!
When you swat a fly with a sledgehammer, you only need to do it once. ;-)

You might find my Wheelbuilding Article http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild useful.

As for the spacing issue, considering your frame's ability to flex easily to 135, using a 135 hub is a good idea, because it will result in a stronger wheel.

See also my Frame Spacing Article http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing

(Track nuts have nothing to do with spacing, they go outside the frame.)

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Old 03-13-05, 01:02 PM   #6
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I'll never wash this thread again. Thanks Sheldon. Your wheelbuilding article is what inspired me to build one in the first place. The Harris Cyclery site(in addition to Park Tools,) has pretty much been my primary text for everything I've learned about working on my own bikes. I didn't notice the respacing article. That helps a lot. Wheelbuilding is the one thing I haven't done to my bike, so I'm anxious to try.
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Old 03-13-05, 03:03 PM   #7
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When you swat a fly with a sledgehammer, you only need to do it once. ;-)
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Old 03-13-05, 04:01 PM   #8
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Spend your money on bikes, not crack.
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Old 03-13-05, 04:56 PM   #9
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HOWEVER, not to insult anyone's advice, but check this out: My frame spacing is indeed 126mm. Now going up to 135mm is only 4 1/2mm on both sides. Aren't there slimmer locknuts to make cold setting unnecessary? Or will that make the cassette hit the frame or something. I'm not trying to start an arguement or disrespect anyone, I'm just curious if smaller locknuts are an option. It reminds me of the aphorism about how you can cover every square inch of the Earth with leather, or you can wear shoes!
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Old 03-13-05, 05:23 PM   #10
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If you are using a modern freehub wheel you will not have the 4 1/2 mm on the drive side. You could take it all off the non drive side, but it realy would be easier and give a stronger wheel to elave the wheel at 135 and open up the frame a little. Coldsetting is just a big word for bending something to point x+y to get it to stay at x. It really is pretty simple. The reason to do it rather than spread the frame every time, for me anyway, is that trying to get the wheel in while pulling the frame open is a pain.
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Old 03-13-05, 05:25 PM   #11
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The locknuts on all my wheels are only about 2 or 3 mm thick to begin with. Some wheels have spacers between the locknuts and the cones. These could be removed to narrow the width.
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Old 03-13-05, 05:39 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krispistoferson
HOWEVER, not to insult anyone's advice, but check this out: My frame spacing is indeed 126mm. Now going up to 135mm is only 4 1/2mm on both sides. Aren't there slimmer locknuts to make cold setting unnecessary? Or will that make the cassette hit the frame or something. I'm not trying to start an arguement or disrespect anyone, I'm just curious if smaller locknuts are an option. It reminds me of the aphorism about how you can cover every square inch of the Earth with leather, or you can wear shoes!
126 mm spacing is for 6- or 7-speed clusters. There isn't usually any room to shorten anything on the right side without causing the chain to rub on the dropout in high gear. You could substitute a 7-speed Freehub body, but that would be pretty silly.

As the Reverend mentioned, there are often spacers on the left side between the cone and the locknut. These can be removed, but this requires increased spoke tension on the right, decreased tension on the left, to bring the rim back to the middle of the frame. The result is a significantly weaker wheel.

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Old 03-13-05, 05:59 PM   #13
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Cold-setting it is. Thanks everyone! Now where'd I put that 2X4...
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