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  1. #1
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    Tire nuts are extremely tight!

    Today, my new tires came in and I went out to my garage eager to change them out. After disengaging the brakes, I started to get to work on removing the nuts which held the tires but...

    Good God, they are so tight.

    Out of all 4 nuts, I could only move one on the front wheel. I have a pretty garbage wrench, and everytime I got a better grip it would simply scrape the nut, and I do not wish to further risk stripping the nuts.

    Is there something I can do to atleast make them looser? I do own some WD-40, but I'm not sure what to do here.

    Any advise?

  2. #2
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Take them to a real bicycle mechanic, and beg for help.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  3. #3
    Senior Member Dave Cutter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by revan114 View Post
    ..... I have a pretty garbage wrench, and everytime I got a better grip it would simply scrape the nut, and I do not wish to further risk stripping the nuts.
    Get a proper set of tools. Although it shouldn't take much of a wrench.... it must be the proper size. Or at least a well made adjustable one. Take the one nut you got off to the store with you to make sure the tools you buy are correct.... although I would normally assume metric... I try not to assume. And not all metric sets are complete.

    Quote Originally Posted by revan114 View Post
    Is there something I can do to atleast make them looser? I do own some WD-40,
    WD-40 won't break free a rusted nut (if rust is the problem). While your asking for help with the wrenches get a penetrating oil.

    Where to go? Sears, LBS, auto parts store, local hardware, home depot, big box store..... any... all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Take them to a real bicycle mechanic, and beg for help.
    +1 I was writing my post while you posted. I like your reply better.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by revan114 View Post
    Is there something I can do to atleast make them looser? I do own some WD-40, but I'm not sure what to do here.
    Buy and use the correct size box wrench or socket to grip all the corners.

    Usually 15mm or 9/16". Don't use an over-sized wrench.

    6 point would be better but 12 will do.

    Don't use a crescent wrench.

    Definitely don't use channel lock or vise grip pliers.

    If rust is involved Aerokroil is a good penetrating oil. WD40 is not.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 01-04-14 at 04:48 PM.

  5. #5
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    Alright, well I was hoping to do the change on my own but it seems like my best option at the moment is just to wait for my uncle to come home from his trip Monday to use his tools to do it, but thanks for the help anyway guys.

  6. #6
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    If you don't want to strip them more, I would go for the vise grips. No, seriously stay away form those unless the nuts are toast. If you are using an adjustable wrench, that could be the problem. Do you have a 15mm and 14mm open/box end wrench? If not, get them and try again. Don't take this wrong, I don't know your mechanical aptitude. Clockwise tightens and counter clockwise loosens.

  7. #7
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    A 3/8" driver & metric socket set should be your next purchase, inexpensive & vital.

    -Bandera
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Dave Cutter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
    .... Don't use a crescent wrench.
    Crescent is a fine maker of tools (although best known for their adjustable wrench). There are many adjustable wrenches suitable for minor bicycle repairs and/or adjustments IMHO. Of course one quality tool may also cost as much as an entire set of elcheapies. Any shiny tool purchased from the $4.99 bin.... won't likely be suitable for much of anything.

    I like Park tools for bicycle repairs. Which.... of course... includes adjustable wrenches.

  9. #9
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    you need , a 15 mm or 9/16 for the rear wheels nuts , an 13 or 14 mm (maybe the 15 mm ) for the front . boxend wrenches will do the job best . some PB blaster will help break loose if rusted . you could use the sockets in the sizes with a breaker bar if needed.
    bikeman715

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    A cheap set of metric combination wrenches will do.
    Just use the box end for loosening tight parts.
    I only use the open end until final tightening with the box end or access problems.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
    Crescent is a fine maker of tools (although best known for their adjustable wrench). There are many adjustable wrenches suitable for minor bicycle repairs and/or adjustments IMHO
    Ha Ha. My middle school shop teacher from 40 yrs ago was very adamant that the Crescent wrench be referred to as an adjustable end wrench but I've found over the years that most people look at me cross eyed if I use that term. I think Crescent is permanently embedded in the North American language as a type of wrench now. Actually probably a good thing for the Crescent company seeing how the founder invented it.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Dave Cutter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
    ...I think Crescent is permanently embedded in the North American language as a type of wrench now.
    I am absolutely sure you're correct. But so many cheap non-working "crescent style" wrenches work so poorly that few people realize how functional a quality adjustable wrench (modern ones are even better) can be. But.... An unskilled person with cheap tools... is failure in the making.

    Too many think they just aren't mechanically inclined.... and never realize they just need good tools and a little know how. With great directions on YouTube, a few bucks on GOOD name brand tools, and a borrowed bicycle repair book or two from the local library and most people can at least maintain their own bicycle.

    Like your shop teacher... I think learning the names of the common tools are a good first step. Of course... I still have "issues" with the term "pneumatic". LOL Since the use of compressed air isn't new (or pneu) and there isn't anything really auto-matic today about power tools. I think the old Chicago Tools Brand Name term of air powered tools is out-dated. I prefer: airdraulic.
    Last edited by Dave Cutter; 01-04-14 at 06:45 PM.

  13. #13
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    ^^True enough. Couldn't agree more about using quality tools as well.

  14. #14
    Home School Valedictorian 02Giant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
    Ha Ha. My middle school shop teacher from 40 yrs ago was very adamant that the Crescent wrench be referred to as an adjustable end wrench but I've found over the years that most people look at me cross eyed if I use that term. I think Crescent is permanently embedded in the North American language as a type of wrench now. Actually probably a good thing for the Crescent company seeing how the founder invented it.
    A little off topic but is the same as all plastic laminates being referred to as Formica.
    We've got no fear, no doubt, all in balls out

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