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Old 01-18-14, 09:56 AM   #1
bikemig 
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7 speed cassette body, 9 speed brifters

I have a bike with 9 speed brifters that needs a new rear wheel. I have a 130mm rear wheel with an old school 7 speed shimano hub and cassette body which I'd like to use on that bike. The wheels and hubs are in good shape but Shimano 105 hubs came on a 1991 bike.

I think these are my "best" options:

(1) Get rid of the brifters and use a pair of 7 speed bar end shifters. This is easy and "zero" cost other than labor.

(2) Keep the brifters and run 8 on the back with the 9 speed spacers. I have a 9 speed cassette which I can modify.

(3) Keep the brifters and get a 9 speed cassette body. I'll have to source a cassette body unless if I can find a crashed wheel or old hub from the local bike shop.

Are there other options I should consider? Are there any issues that I need to think about with any of these three options?
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Old 01-18-14, 10:26 AM   #2
Bill Kapaun
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Option 3 would require removing the correct amount of spacers and redishing the wheel, since a 9 speed body is about 3-4mm longer.
Option 2 gives you 8 gears vs option 1.
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Old 01-18-14, 10:49 AM   #3
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1a,) get rid of the brifters. and learn how to shift a bike without indexing, with regular bar end shifters..

with the right cog sizes 7 will be sufficient .. and the dish will be less, as the space for 8th cog (not added width)
is not requiring further spoke tension on the right side , to make it So.
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Old 01-18-14, 11:27 AM   #4
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If your hub takes a standard cassette body then I have a 9 speed sitting around. I'll sell it cheap. Pm me
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Old 01-18-14, 11:44 AM   #5
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Unless you don't like brake/shift levers, it seems a lot easier just to get the correct wheel, than to replace your brake/shift levers with separate brake levers and shifters.

I would recommend you just replace the wheel (which I'll call option 4). Option 3 (replace the cassette body) would likely require some re-spacing and re-dishing of the wheel. Are you good with wheel truing?

(5) Also, depending on what happened to your old wheel, you may have another option. If the rim is a taco but the spokes weren't cracked (and you have no reason to think spokes are starting to break from fatigue), you could buy a replacement rim that has the same depth (and spoke bed diameter) as the prior rim. Then you can keep the lacing pattern of the spokes and hub, and migrate the spokes over by taping the new rim to the old one. Again, this requires some wheelbuilding skill.

Each of these options (3, 4, and 5) allows you to keep 9-speed. 3 and 5 will require some skill with a wheel truing stand. 4 (the replacement rear wheel, new or used) will probably be the easiest.
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Old 01-18-14, 12:29 PM   #6
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How about doing an "8 of 9"?

Take apart a 9-speed cassette and remove 1 of the cogs. Now you have a cassette that has 8 cogs, 9-speed spacing, but is the right width to fit a 7-speed freehub body. Your existing brifters will index the 8 rear cogs.
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Old 01-18-14, 12:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
How about doing an "8 of 9"?

Take apart a 9-speed cassette and remove 1 of the cogs. Now you have a cassette that has 8 cogs, 9-speed spacing, but is the right width to fit a 7-speed freehub body. Your existing brifters will index the 8 rear cogs.
That was option 2 the OP offered.
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Old 01-19-14, 12:51 AM   #8
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Another option is to use the 9-speed brifters with a 7-speed cassette. There are a few ways to do this
1) Use an alternate cable attachment at the rear derailer that will cause it to move a little more which each shift http://sheldonbrown.com/dura-ace.html#alternate
2) Get a Dura-Ace 7400, 7401, or 7402 rear derailer.
3) Get a jtek shiftmate to map from shimano 9-speed to shimano 8-speed

Note: all of these methods are really intended for using 9-speed shifters with an 8-speed cassette. But 7- and 8-speed spacing is really close and they will also usually work well enough for 7-speed. You could also change out the 7-speed cassette spacers to 8-speed to get actual 8-speed spacing.

Last edited by Gonzo Bob; 01-19-14 at 12:55 AM.
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Old 01-19-14, 09:19 PM   #9
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Finding a 8/9/10s Shimano cassette body should be a piece of piss, as is re-dishing the wheel. #3 is a no-brainer, IMO.
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