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  1. #1
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    Need to replace my early 90's Vintage Paramount's Deore front deraileur. With WHAT???

    I tried to ride it for the first time in a couple of years (knee surgeries). Looks like it took a blow from something in storage. It may be adjusted out, but as old as it is, I thought just better to replace it. I think it is an LX Deore of the downpull type. 3 rings. Not sure if there is NOS parts to still find out there, or what's the next best replacement. I don't need XT, XTR (if they even make it anymore), but whatever will work. Part advise pleaseeee?? Thanks!

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    If it's non indexing, than any triple front would work. OTOH, if it's index than you have to match the general class to the levers, and more info is needed.
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  3. #3
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    Yes, it's not important what brand/model the bike is, but rather the shift levers that are installed.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

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    I think it has Rapid Fire or Rapid Fire Plus levers. It's a triple chainring with 7 spd cassette, if that helps. The left grip lever moves the DR in and out, it just won't go out, or really in far enough to come off the middle ring. Not sure if the cable could have slipped when it's never been an issue before. I used to tear single speed bikes down a lot as a kid and rebuild them into knobby dirt bmx types. But a lot of time passed until I got back into riding in the early nineties. I haven't had that much experience on cables, deraileurs, etc, not that I wouldn't like to learn. Can you define "indexing"?

  5. #5
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    May be a crazy question, but you write Paramount and appear to be talking mtb. Is it a PDG Series mtb? My '91 series 70 has a pulley on the seat tube below the fd. If yours has such and the cable is incorrectly routed that could account for the insufficient pull. Shot in the dark, I know.
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  6. #6
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    If it's non indexing, than any triple front would work. OTOH, if it's index than you have to match the general class to the levers, and more info is needed.
    Nope. With front derailers it doesn't matter if the shifter is friction or index, both work the same for any derailer. Rear is a little trickier but not by much and only if you are trying to use a pre-index derailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big1hasspoke View Post
    I tried to ride it for the first time in a couple of years (knee surgeries). Looks like it took a blow from something in storage. It may be adjusted out, but as old as it is, I thought just better to replace it. I think it is an LX Deore of the downpull type. 3 rings. Not sure if there is NOS parts to still find out there, or what's the next best replacement. I don't need XT, XTR (if they even make it anymore), but whatever will work. Part advise pleaseeee?? Thanks!
    You could put any mountain bike front derailer on the bike you like as long as it's the right size for the seat tube. Even if it's too large there are shims that are readily available. You want a bottom swing (aka high mount) in a dual pull. A Deore FD-M591-10 would do nicely and they aren't expensive. They can be had for as little as $10 plus shipping (Newbie hint: click on the blue and it will take you to the link) As luck would have it, the Deore is actually a better front derailer than its more expensive brothers.
    Stuart Black
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  7. #7
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    I suspect that this is a bike with non original equipment, including the triple crankset.

    I'm not a real Shimano man, but I believe that rapid fire was a system used with upright bars. If it truly is aParamount, the cable routing would have been under the BB.

    It's really hard to diagnose a problem without specific details, it's like going to the doctor and saying "I don't feel good".

    Given the amount of time this bike sat around, I suggest you consider letting someone giving it a quick once over. I wouldn't be at all surprised if cable housings were breaking down, and the brake shoes are probably hard as rocks. This can be pricy at some shops, but won't be as bad at a "dirty fingernails" shop that does lots or repairs. If there's a bike co-op around that's probably your best bet for the whole thing.

    BTW- if you list your area of residence, folks might be able to refer you to the right place to go.
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    yes, mine is the same style as yours. Yours probably came with XTR, IIRC. I think 70 was the top, 30 was the bottom, but they were all nice stuff back then. My cables are stock as they came, pulley and all. May be a crazy response, but I don't believe they used Deore on anything but MTBs.... I did find a link that confirmed they are Rapid Fire thumb shifters, 7 spd cassette. 1992_Pmt_14.jpg mine is likethe red one. Maybe a 92 model.....

  9. #9
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    I suspect that this is a bike with non original equipment, including the triple crankset.

    I'm not a real Shimano man, but I believe that rapid fire was a system used with upright bars. If it truly is aParamount, the cable routing would have been under the BB.

    It's really hard to diagnose a problem without specific details, it's like going to the doctor and saying "I don't feel good".

    Given the amount of time this bike sat around, I suggest you consider letting someone giving it a quick once over. I wouldn't be at all surprised if cable housings were breaking down, and the brake shoes are probably hard as rocks. This can be pricy at some shops, but won't be as bad at a "dirty fingernails" shop that does lots or repairs. If there's a bike co-op around that's probably your best bet for the whole thing.

    BTW- if you list your area of residence, folks might be able to refer you to the right place to go.
    It's a mountain bike... probably with the original parts. Schwinn imported mountain bikes under the Paramount badge (actually Paramount Design Group or PDG) from Asia in the early 90s. The Deore LX derailer indicates a Series 30 from 1991 or 1992 which came with Deore LX group, including Rapidfire shifters. In 93 they changed the groups to DX according to the catalogs
    Stuart Black
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  10. #10
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big1hasspoke View Post
    yes, mine is the same style as yours. Yours probably came with XTR, IIRC. I think 70 was the top, 30 was the bottom, but they were all nice stuff back then. My cables are stock as they came, pulley and all. May be a crazy response, but I don't believe they used Deore on anything but MTBs.... I did find a link that confirmed they are Rapid Fire thumb shifters, 7 spd cassette. 1992_Pmt_14.jpg mine is likethe red one. Maybe a 92 model.....
    You should probably take the bike to a shop to be sure what is wrong with the derailer.

    The good news if you have to replace it is that we have top pull derailers now that mean you can get rid of the goofy pulley system. The derailers of that age didn't come in top and bottom pull so they had to route the cable around the pulley. With the new ones, you don't have to do that anymore. It can pull from the upper cable stop.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    It's a mountain bike... probably with the original parts. Schwinn imported mountain bikes under the Paramount badge (actually Paramount Design Group or PDG) from Asia in the early 90s. The Deore LX derailer indicates a Series 30 from 1991 or 1992 which came with Deore LX group, including Rapidfire shifters. In 93 they changed the groups to DX according to the catalogs
    Yeah, the OP didn't say anything, and I had no reason to suspect that the folks at Schwinn would take one of their most venerable road bike names and put it on a mountain bike. That's like Ford bringing out a Thunderbird pickup truck.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    To FBinNY , Ford did with their Lincoln line a few years ago , Took the F-150 and put the Lincoln's logo on it .
    bikeman715

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeman715 View Post
    To FBinNY , Ford did with their Lincoln line a few years ago , Took the F-150 and put the Lincoln's logo on it .
    Possibly a thumb our nose move aimed at the carry overs from the old Mercury division. It might also have been related to their to no longer make large sedans.

    It's a shame that corporations today have so little respect for their own classic trademarks.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Possibly a thumb our nose move aimed at the carry overs from the old Mercury division. It might also have been related to their to no longer make large sedans.

    It's a shame that corporations today have so little respect for their own classic trademarks.
    I agree with you , it is a shame . There was a time you tell a car make by it shape and some what true for bicycles for awhile too .
    bikeman715

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    I suppose Schwinn saw "Paramount" as a bike name instead of strictly a road bike name. The PDG Series mountain bikes did Schwinn proud. They were very fine steel hardtails, especially the 70 and 90.
    "Foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds." Emerson

  16. #16
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    In the late '80's, Schwinn played around with the Paramount name with their top-line Schwinn Paramountain mountain bikes....Ned Overend, a truly great mountain bike racer, rode them, in fact.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big1hasspoke View Post
    . Can you define "indexing"?
    The shifters have distinct indexes (indents, clicks ... ) so that you shift crisply into each gear. It requires that the shifters, derailleur and cogs are compatible so that everything moves the right amount for each shift.

    With "friction" shifting, the rider has to shift by feel into each gear.

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Yeah, the OP didn't say anything, and I had no reason to suspect that the folks at Schwinn would take one of their most venerable road bike names and put it on a mountain bike. That's like Ford bringing out a Thunderbird pickup truck.
    Big1hasspoke didn't have to say that it was a mountain bike. Deore parts and RapidFire shifters are dead give aways for mountain bikes. It doesn't hurt that I know a lot about mountain bikes, mountain bike models and mountain bike componentry.

    Putting the Paramount name on mountain bikes made a lot of sense in the early 90s. You couldn't hardly give away road bikes in that era. Mountain bikes were very hot. Lots and lots of pure road bike companies jumped on the band wagon. Campagnolo even made an awful mountain bike group in the late 80s and very early 90s. It was incredibly expensive and didn't work. Even Cinelli made a mountain bike then. But then every major road bike manufacturer jumped into the mountain bike game.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    It's a shame that corporations today have so little respect for their own classic trademarks.
    Do you expect any publicly-traded company to look past the idiocy of the sharemarket?

    If you're in business and want to retain any shred of integrity, never float your company.

  20. #20
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    "If you're in business and want to retain any shred of integrity, never float your company."

    +100 Integrity and business sense. Many fine companies have gone down the toilet pandering to "the street" and short-term "making the numbers" instead of making rational, long term decisions and investments.

  21. #21
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
    "If you're in business and want to retain any shred of integrity, never float your company."

    +100 Integrity and business sense. Many fine companies have gone down the toilet pandering to "the street" and short-term "making the numbers" instead of making rational, long term decisions and investments.
    And many fine companies have gone down the toilet by not paying attention to the market. Schwinn, Raleigh, Mongoose, GT, Miyata and Univega are but a few of the companies that didn't pay attention to the market until too late and couldn't catch up. They offered too many road bikes in a time when mountain bikes were the rage and then their mountain bike designs were behind the curve by the time they introduced them. They, like buggy whip companies, were still making buggy whips when there were no horses to use them on.

    Other companies like Specialized, Trek and Cannondale recognized the market and responded. Specialized went from a company that imported and made parts to a bicycling power house almost overnight by just recognizing and following the trend. Then, through research and development, they went from following the trend to driving the trend. By the time that Paramount was introducing an okay steel mountain bike, Specialized had had carbon fiber mountain bikes in production for 2 years. Their other mountain bikes were benefiting from the trickle down of technology and innovation.

    I know that Cannondale isn't the company it once was but that's not because they weren't trying to drive the trend. If anything they were too far beyond the edge of the envelope. Some of their designs were truly exciting but a little too "out there". The HeadShok, for example, is a brilliant idea. Independently sliding legs on forks requires a very strong brake bridge and the early shock forks weren't really up to the task. The HeadShok gave you suspension but only have a single point of movement. The fork tracked better because the legs connected to the axle worked together. The same can be said of the Lefty. Unfortunately, both designs were too avant garde. However, Cannondale didn't go under because they were too "out there". They decided to go into the motorcycle market that they knew nothing about with a product that was every bit as behind the curve as Schwinn's mountain bike offerings.

    Finally, there's Trek. Where Specialized drove the trend with ground breaking designs and technology and Cannondale pushed the market with avant garde designs, Trek has done an excellent job of just staying on the top of the curve. Nothing the Trek has offered in terms of mountain bikes (or road bike, really) is cutting edge or ground breaking. They just make good solid bikes. Personally, I find their offerings a bit boring but not as boring as what Raleigh has offered over the years. Schwinn's stuff, with the exception of the Home Grown and Paramount lines, is equally as boring.

    Trek, Specialized and Cannondale all pandered to "the street", followed the trend and made very rational, long term decisions and investments. The "dead" companies didn't. They payed the price.
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  22. #22
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    That's like Ford bringing out a Thunderbird pickup truck.
    That's might have been a better fate then what Ford really did to the Thunderbird. They took a lovely little car with a lot of style and turned it into a "Lincoln Lite". My petite wife drove a Thunderbird (1966, I think) and to call it a pig is an insult to pigs. I drove a 1960 Chevy Apache 10 that handled better and it had Armstrong steering. The 1955 to 1957 T-Bird is a lovely car. By 1958, not so much. By 1960, the Uggggllly had settled in for good.
    Stuart Black
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    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

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