Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-21-14, 06:50 PM   #1
monroeja
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
wheel size : tube size : tire size...confused

I just had a shop rebuild one of my bikes. They put the tires on backwards so I took them off which is when I noticed that the tires and tubes were way bigger than what I previously had on the wheels and seem too big. Can anyone tell me if these tubes and tires are too big for my wheel?

Wheel Size: 622-14
Tube Size: 700x28/32c
Tire Size: 37-622 (28x1 3/8 x 1 5/8)

My previous tires were 25-622 (700x25c) and they seem to be a perfect fit. These new tires are supposed to be cold weather tires. Is that why they sized them up? Is this safe? If it is acceptable, I don't know how I'm going to get them back on either way. I've tried multiple times and I've been unsuccessful. Thanks for any help.
monroeja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 07:12 PM   #2
Crescent Cycle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
622 is the BSD (Bead seat diameter) in millimeters also known as ISO, since ISO uses BSD to describe rim size. It is the same as 700c. 14 should be the inner width of the rim where the tire goes in millimeters.

Tube size is for 700c rims/tires and the tube is suitable for tires between 28-32mm. Ignore where the c is. People debate where the c belongs, but it means the 700 is 700c. There are other 700 sizes but they are exceptionally rare.

The tire size means 37mm width, for a 622 BSD (700c) rim. That means your tube is too small, although you might be able to get away with it. Sheldon Brown would advise not using a 37mm wide tire on a 14mm wide rim. You might also want to check you have the frame clearance. The difference between 25mm and 37mm is rather large.

You can read more here. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
Crescent Cycle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 07:27 PM   #3
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: In Central IN
Bikes: RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
Posts: 13,284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Your new tires are significantly larger than your old tires. Not huge, but bigger than what you were running.
Have never heard of cold weather tires. Do they have a tread that would work better with snow?
__________________
RANS V3 - Ti, RANS V-Rex - cromo, RANS Screamer - cromo
JanMM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 07:55 PM   #4
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Edwardsville, Illinois
Bikes: Colnago Nuova Mexico, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Pinarello Gavia, Schwinn Paramount, Motobecane Grand Record, Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Origin8 monstercross, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2
Posts: 10,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
Your new tires are significantly larger than your old tires. Not huge, but bigger than what you were running.
Have never heard of cold weather tires. Do they have a tread that would work better with snow?
He might have Continental Top Contact Winters. These are not studded, but the tread design and compound is intended for winter weather. See: http://www.conti-online.com/www/bicy...Winter_en.html
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.
Barrettscv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 07:59 PM   #5
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: In Central IN
Bikes: RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
Posts: 13,284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
He might have Continental Top Contact Winters. These are not studded, but the tread design and compound is intended for winter weather. See: http://www.conti-online.com/www/bicy...Winter_en.html
Interesting.
__________________
RANS V3 - Ti, RANS V-Rex - cromo, RANS Screamer - cromo
JanMM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 08:22 PM   #6
monroeja
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
Your new tires are significantly larger than your old tires. Not huge, but bigger than what you were running.
Have never heard of cold weather tires. Do they have a tread that would work better with snow?
They're not "cold weather tires", just tires that have more tread on them. I have a surly so I can put some decent sized tires on. They put some Continental Travel Contacts on.
monroeja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 08:32 PM   #7
monroeja
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crescent Cycle View Post
622 is the BSD (Bead seat diameter) in millimeters also known as ISO, since ISO uses BSD to describe rim size. It is the same as 700c. 14 should be the inner width of the rim where the tire goes in millimeters.

Tube size is for 700c rims/tires and the tube is suitable for tires between 28-32mm. Ignore where the c is. People debate where the c belongs, but it means the 700 is 700c. There are other 700 sizes but they are exceptionally rare.

The tire size means 37mm width, for a 622 BSD (700c) rim. That means your tube is too small, although you might be able to get away with it. Sheldon Brown would advise not using a 37mm wide tire on a 14mm wide rim. You might also want to check you have the frame clearance. The difference between 25mm and 37mm is rather large.

You can read more here. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
Thanks. I've read Sheldon Brown's webpage regarding all this info, but I'm an idiot. The frame clearance is fine because it's a Surly.

It sounds like the tire width is too large for the wheel and the tube is too small for the oversized tire. My next question...what is the ideal sized tire I should purchase for my wheels? Was my old tire, the 25-622 (700cx25) the ideal size? How much bigger could I go?
monroeja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 08:37 PM   #8
Crescent Cycle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You could probably get away with 28mm or even 32mm. Sheldon lists 25mm for 13mm and 32mm for 15mm. That would place 28mm for 14mm in the middle. Beyond that, while you could still fit fatter tires on the rims, it may be wise to use wider rims for wider tires but you could probably still get away with going a little wider than what Sheldon recommends.
Crescent Cycle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 08:50 PM   #9
hueyhoolihan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
Bikes: 7⃥ 9 road bikes
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
you are fine, if you wanted sturdy, last forever, heavy, tires on your bike. probably get fewer flats too. it's up to you. i wouldn't worry about the tube size.

the fact that you can't remount the tires is problematic though. if you DO get a flat, it could turn out to be a real inconvenience.
hueyhoolihan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 10:08 PM   #10
monroeja
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
you are fine, if you wanted sturdy, last forever, heavy, tires on your bike. probably get fewer flats too. it's up to you. i wouldn't worry about the tube size.

the fact that you can't remount the tires is problematic though. if you DO get a flat, it could turn out to be a real inconvenience.
I definitely did want sturdy tires for the winter, so that is good news. I'll go back to the lbs to see if they can show me the trick to getting them on.
monroeja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-14, 11:48 PM   #11
monroeja
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the help. After I got the assurance that the tires weren't too big I got them on pretty easily. It was a mental thing.
monroeja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-14, 06:34 AM   #12
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 5,360
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Tubes will pretty much stretch to fit whatever casing they're put in, and it's very rarely an immediate problem.
The more they stretch, the thinner the rubber gets though, which can influence how well they hold pressure, and may also make them more vulnerable to getting flats.
A tube from the lower end of the range is often recommended, as it can make it easier to mount the tire w/o damaging the tube.
Yours is rated to go to 32 and you're using it in a 37, not a big deal.
I'd replace-if-proven-needed, but otherwise ride it.
dabac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-14, 07:31 AM   #13
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,811
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by monroeja View Post
Thanks. I've read Sheldon Brown's webpage regarding all this info, but I'm an idiot. The frame clearance is fine because it's a Surly.

It sounds like the tire width is too large for the wheel and the tube is too small for the oversized tire. My next question...what is the ideal sized tire I should purchase for my wheels? Was my old tire, the 25-622 (700cx25) the ideal size? How much bigger could I go?
Brown's chart for tire fit is overly conservative. Mountain bikes regularly use 17mm rims with 50mm wide tires without issues. He mentions this above the chart

Quote:
If you use a very wide tire on a narrow rim, you risk sidewall or rim failure. This combination causes very sloppy handling at low speeds. Unfortunately, current mountain-bike fashion pushes the edge of this... Such narrow rims work very poorly with wide tires, unless the tires are overinflated...
Very wide tires do put some stress the rim but rim failure isn't all the common in mountain bikes. Sidewall failure is even less of a problem. And mountain bike tires are anything but "overinflated". They are usually run at from 20 to 45psi, depending on rider weight and trail conditions. And mountain bikes spend a lot of time in low speed situations where handling is very important. Brown wasn't a mountain biker so he had no experience with the issues.

You shouldn't be overly concerned about the tires on your bike. You shouldn't be concerned at all about the tubes. Tube expand to fill the tire. If they had put 19/23mm tubes in the tires, the tubes would still stretch enough to fill the space. They might be a little thinner when filled but that's not much of a problem is practice. With the exception of "thorn proof" tubes, tubes don't provide much protection against puncture. The difference in thickness between a 19/23mm tube stretched to fill a 37mm tire and a 37mm tube are only going to be fractions of an inch...not enough to make a difference.

I'd say ride the tires and see how they work. An added bonus of wide tires is that the rolling resistance is lower. It's counter-intuitive but true.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-14, 03:47 PM   #14
davidad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 4,829
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Forget about the tube, it will be fine.
davidad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-14, 04:02 PM   #15
Al1943
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Oklahoma
Bikes: Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
Posts: 9,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Try them and see. It really depends on how you plan to use the bike and what you are use to. If your bike feels sluggish it's because the tires are too big and too heavy.
Al1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:30 PM.