Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-07-14, 09:08 AM   #1
Fumbles22
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 110
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Side pull brakes

Hello,

I took my side pull brakes off a while ago to clean them. It's time to put them back on, but I seem to have some parts left over...

Firstly, what are these? I have two of them left over.



(ignore the white dust. I was a little enthusiastic with the car wax).

They have a flat side, but the opposite side is ridged. It's ridged in the same way the "main" caliper bolt is ridged.

Also, what are these (two of these left too)?



I know that they go next to the frame, but is this on the front or rear brake (or one on each)?

Finally, do I put this flat against the frame?



...or does something else go inbetween?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 100_3825_zps3e3d172c.jpg (43.6 KB, 37 views)
File Type: jpg 100_3826_zps722df403.jpg (33.6 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg 100_3828_zps967508e4.jpg (49.6 KB, 29 views)

Last edited by Fumbles22; 02-07-14 at 09:28 AM.
Fumbles22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 09:56 AM   #2
Andrew R Stewart 
Andrew R Stewart
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder
Posts: 6,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
First photo is of the center bolt's (the mounting to fork bolt) spacers. Some set ups need to have the caliper further away from the fork then others. these spacers allow this. Generally at least one is used most all the time.

Second photo is much the same but has the one side curved to better fit against a fork crown that is also curved. If the fork crown is flat at the brake mounting hole then this curved spacer is not needed. The rear brake has the same but it's curved spacer has a tighter curvature as the brake bridge is a smaller diameter tube then the crown might be.

Third photo- Typically a spacer is placed both in front and behind the fork crown, curved spacer if the crown is also curved, flat if the fork is flat. These spacers allow the caliper to fit the fork better and more solidly. Andy.
Andrew R Stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 10:21 AM   #3
Prowler 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 NW of Philadelphia
Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes
Posts: 763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I'm told the 'one side curved' thing is called a 'half moon washer' and it needed on rear brakes that have flat center bolts and flat nuts and washers tightened down on a round tube bridge. The two half moon washers provide the interface between the round bridge and the flat bits clamping around it. Distributes the clamping force to protect the frame tube. I've seen bikes that have no half moon washers and the brake bridge between the seat stays is a bit mashed - a shame. 'Bracket' the rear bridge with the two half moon washers and snug things up. Oh, Dave Moulton has a nice entry on his blog site about centering the side pulls when you install them. worth a read.
Prowler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 11:17 AM   #4
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,796
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
large arc half moon washers are for the fork , smaller radius ones are for a plain round tube seat stay bridge

since tubes are round and the brake and nuts are flat , you need pairs front and rear of both

your front brake may neet those other spacers the flat faced one to get clearance around the headset lower,
for things like racks or at least the reflector mounts.

toothieness will keep brake caliper somewhat .. centered..

Last edited by fietsbob; 02-07-14 at 11:21 AM.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 11:50 AM   #5
leob1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Middle of the road, NJ
Bikes:
Posts: 2,542
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Look for scars in the paint and\or polished parts to see where the serated part of those spacers went. Use them as a clue to where they are supposed to be.
And clean all that grease off the caliper. All it will do is make dirt stick.
leob1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 12:20 PM   #6
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 29,404
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
The others have answered the specific questions, so here are some general rules for the fuure.

1- any serrated washers or spacers are to improve traction between the brake and frame or fork, or within a washer/spacer stack.
2- thich washers, are really spacers designed to move the brake away from the frame or fork, usually to increase brake shoe clearance
3- curved (one side) washers are to mate the brake to a curved surface like you'd fine on the fork or seat stay. The curvature has to match what it fits against.

Now to avoid errors when taking apart things (anything) one is not familiar with.

The key to working with the unfamiliar is the same as walking to Grandmothers house through unfamiliar woods. Leave bread crumbs so you can find your way back along the same path.

1- take a digital before photo (or more than one), hopefully showing any spacers, washers, seals etc.
2- lay parts on a paper towel in the sequence and orientation as they come off, so you can reverse the sequence as you put it back together.
3- Take a photo of the parts laid out in case a critter eats your breadcrumbs, or you knock them all off onto the floor, or want to wash them.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 02-07-14 at 12:39 PM.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 12:23 PM   #7
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
The key to working with the unfamiliar is the same as walking to Grandmothers house through unfamiliar woods. Leave bread crumbs so you can find your way back along the same path.1.
Unfortunately, for some people it's like Hansel and Gretel, they left a trail of bread crumbs but the birds ate them.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 12:48 PM   #8
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 29,404
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Unfortunately, for some people it's like Hansel and Gretel, they left a trail of bread crumbs but the birds ate them.
Yes, but these days they can use technology to record a series of GPS datapoints. That's why I suggested memorializing the laid out in sequence with digital photos.

Another thing people can do when wotking on things like brakes where they have two, is to do only one at a time, so they have the other as a model in case they get lost.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-14, 01:42 PM   #9
seedsbelize 
Senior Member
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Bikes: '84 Schwinn Letour Luxe, '87 Schw'inn Prelude, 91 Giant Yukon, 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5 '73 World Voyageur
Posts: 2,894
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Love the user name. Logically speaking, mine should be mittens.
__________________



Quote:
Originally Posted by Kactus View Post
Flubber.
seedsbelize is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-14, 03:32 AM   #10
Fumbles22
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 110
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think i've put them in properly. I followed fietsbob and put the half moon washers on the front fork.

Quote:
your front brake may neet those other spacers the flat faced one to get clearance around the headset lower,
for things like racks
I also applied this, but to my back brake. I have a luggage rack that fits onto the brakes so I used the order (excluding the calipers) luggage rack - spacer - frame - spacer - nut. I put the ridged end of the spacer up against the frame to hold it in place (thanks leob1!).

Quote:
The key to working with the unfamiliar is the same as walking to Grandmothers house through unfamiliar woods. Leave bread crumbs so you can find your way back along the same path.

1- take a digital before photo (or more than one), hopefully showing any spacers, washers, seals etc.
2- lay parts on a paper towel in the sequence and orientation as they come off, so you can reverse the sequence as you put it back together.
3- Take a photo of the parts laid out in case a critter eats your breadcrumbs, or you knock them all off onto the floor, or want to wash them.
I actually did this! I watched an episode of Wheeler Dealers on Discovery and he did the same thing. He took digital photos and videos, but he also sellotaped the nuts and bolts to pieces of paper with labels on them.

When I did it, I put all the pieces in a line in the order they were removed. Unfortunately, I couldn't see which washers were washers and which were half moon washers. I also had the calipers separately (the car wax on them was drying). I also forgot where the frame went too. If I was doing it again, i'd take photos of them on the bike as well.

Also, I forgot which "main caliper bolt" (the one with the bolt that the spring goes onto) went with which brake. I ended up messing it up and I was trying to put the shorter rear one on the front and vice versa. It took me some time to figure it out.

I haven't put the brake cables on yet (i'm waiting for the levers and brake blocks to arrive) but I think i've done it right.

Quote:
Love the user name. Logically speaking, mine should be mittens.
Thanks, I got it from Robot Chicken https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DW3dg9VURMU
Fumbles22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-14, 01:56 PM   #11
Thumpic 
Senior Member
 
Thumpic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: The Sunny South
Bikes:
Posts: 1,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Pics.....pics...pics...pics.... I always take beaucoup pics of my bikes before/during/after rehab. It's easy and cheap back up info for times like this.

I also save pics and schematics that the resident experts are kind enough to post in this forum on occasion. Somewhere I have a bookmark to the Shimano tech docs sight; great reference information.
__________________
Thumpic....

Green is the new "CHEAP"

Last edited by Thumpic; 02-08-14 at 02:01 PM.
Thumpic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-14, 02:23 PM   #12
CustomSteel
Senior Member
 
CustomSteel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: US
Bikes: 50's-60's Ross Deluxe, 68 Schwinn, 83 Peugeot P8, 84 Jamis Durango, 85 Peugeot PH501, 86 Raleigh Grand Prix, 91 Maruishi RX-7, 92 Marin Bear Valley, 92 Trek 950
Posts: 177
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Digital pictures really are your best friend when disassembling and reassembling anything on bikes, cars, etc.

I use ziploc bags to keep parts in, with appropriate labels when necessary.

In the case of the brake parts, you can loop a wire or string through the hardware so you can keep them in order while they are off the stem for the brake arms.

The washer with the curved side, that has been identified as a half moon washer, is indeed for the front side of the fork.
CustomSteel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:24 PM.