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  1. #1
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    Issue with changing pedals

    Need some help here guys, I just bought a set of Shimano Click'R PD-T400 pedals to put on my Kona Splice. I am unable to get the old pedals off my bike, using my adjustable wrench I can't get the pedal bolts to budge. Any tips or tricks here?

    This is only a 6 month old bike, and yes I am aware the left side pedal is opposite threaded.

  2. #2
    Senior Member curbtender's Avatar
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    One foot on the other pedal and one foot on your wrench...
    “At 50, everyone has the face he deserves.”
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  3. #3
    Senior Member curbtender's Avatar
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    I'd use a fixed wrench.
    “At 50, everyone has the face he deserves.”
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  4. #4
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    Try spraying from the backside of the crank with something like WD-40 . Use a cheater bar on the wrench to break losses the pedals . When put on the new ones grease the treads or in a pinch plumper's tape so it be easier the next time .
    bikeman715

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    The trick is simply more leverage, and stabilizing the crank so it doesn't turn.

    Removing pedals involves tuning the tops to the back (both sides) . This means the crank will rotate making the job harder. So step one is to arrange the pedal wrench back toward the crank arm to minimize the torque turning the entire crank.

    My favorite (no bike stand) method for freeing tough pedals is to turn the crank so the the pedal I'm removing is toward the front. Place the wrench on pointing backward (toward center of the crank), and rotate the cranks so the wrench is nearly horizontal, and support the opposite crank in that position. Straddle the bike, place foot on the wench and stand suddenly as if starting from the curb.
    FB
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  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Pedal wrenches are made 1/8" thick for a reason .. your Adjustable wrench is too thick ..

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Pedal wrenches are made 1/8" thick for a reason .. your Adjustable wrench is too thick ..
    Unlike earlier designs, most pedals today have clearance for wider wrenches, with clear shaft to the outside of the wrench flats. In any case, if the ability to slide the wench on were the problem, the OP would have described it as such rather than saying he can't get the pedal to budge.
    FB
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    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Of course some have no 15 mm flats at all , exclusively allen wrench fitting ..

    often it's 6mm, my Ergon's use an 8.

  9. #9
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    I would not use an adjustable wrench. They have too much play to allow transfer of torque efficiently. I have used a good 15mm wrench to break pedals free. I used a pipe slipped over the wrench for additional leverage.

    As far as I'm concerned, adjustable wrenches are only really useful for adjusting headsets when one doesn't have the proper headset wrench.
    "When dealing with stuff like this consider that this is a bicycle, not a spaceship." -- FBinNY

  10. #10
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    Get a proper pedal wrench or a long pattern open end wrench. Put the wrench on the pedal such that the wrench is closest to the crank. Some Kroil or PB Blaster may be needed to help you break the threads loose. Be sure to clean and grease the threads before reinstalling them. I use TefGel to avois electrolytic corrosion of the dissimilar metals.

  11. #11
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
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    I find it easiest if you can position the pedal wrench handle just in front of the crank and pointing back towards the spindle. Then you can just squeeze the wrench against crank itself. I have little trouble getting even the most stuck pedal spindles loose using this method as long as I can get the wrench close enough to the crank so I can grip them both in the right (loosening) orientation. I have pretty decent hand-strength though and a decently long pedal wrench. With your hands nearly at the pedal spindle this is a LOT of leverage.

    Having a crow-foot 15mm socket and a ratchet wrench makes this technique possible no matter what direction the pedal flats are oriented.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member NVanHiker's Avatar
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    I broke down and paid the twenty bucks for a pedal wrench at MEC (equivalent of REI). Well worth it. Maybe you can borrow one?

  13. #13
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    Thanks guys, got my new pedals on. The stand on wrench method FBinNY mentioned worked!!

  14. #14
    Andrew R Stewart Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
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    Did the OP put some grease on the new pedal's threads to make the next removal easier? Andy.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by KonaRider125 View Post
    Thanks guys, got my new pedals on. The stand on wrench method FBinNY mentioned worked!!
    Glad it worked. Don't forget AS's advice to grease the threads before installing the next pair.
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    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  16. #16
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    I did make sure to put grease on the threads of the new pedals, thanks again guys.

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