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Old 02-09-14, 02:19 PM   #1
DOS
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Suntour freewheel cogs

As I noted some time ago in this thread--

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ble?highlight=

some time ago I stripped one of the notches in a lightly worn Suntour winner pro freewheel that I would like to use on a rebuild I am doing. I finally got around to disassembling the freewheel so I can install the cogs on a new body. I have two questions:

1. After removing the cogs from the old body and stacking them neatly so as to know how to align them on the new body, I managed while tidying up to send the stack flying about my work room. So now I am a bit confused as to which way the cogs should go on. Sheldon says "Many sprockets are asymmetrical. The high side of the teeth of SunTour sprockets faces to the right.". I am not sue what this means but the teeth of four inner sprockets of the 6 speed freewheel (two smallest screw on so I know which way they face) are chamfered on one side and flat on the other. Am I correct that what Sheldon refers to as the high side refers to the non chamfered side and that they should face outward? This would put the markings on the sprockets (# of teeth) facing inward.

2. I also have a 6 speed suntour pro compe freewheel, the largest cog from which is somewhat larger than the big cog on the winner pro so I would like to use the bigger cog to give me a somewhat lower low gear. While clearly the four small cogs on the pro compe are not compatible with the winner pro body, the two largest cogs appear to have the same spline pattern as the winner pro. Can anyone confirm that these two cogs would work on the winner pro body?

Thanks


Found answer to question 2 here:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...freewheel-cogs

Last edited by DOS; 02-09-14 at 02:35 PM.
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Old 02-09-14, 02:46 PM   #2
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I'm thinking your freewheel stuff surely predates funny shaped freewheel cog teeth. I used to mix and match freewheel cogs to get the ratios I wanted. I'd just stack them together. You may need to eyeball the spaces between the cogs to make sure they're all about the same. The first and second cogs are position specific.
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Old 02-09-14, 02:47 PM   #3
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Picture the tops of the teeth as a shed roof. The apex is toward the outside (smaller sprockets) and it slopes toward the inside. That allows the point to catch and lift a chain coming from the smaller sprocket for a crisp shift response. Turned the other way the tooth would tend to push the chain back to the smaller sprocket.

If the sprockets are without built in spacers, and fit the spline, than they're usable. If either condition isn't met, they're not, though you might be able to work around the spacing issue.
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Old 02-09-14, 04:04 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Picture the tops of the teeth as a shed roof. The apex is toward the outside (smaller sprockets) and it slopes toward the inside. That allows the point to catch and lift a chain coming from the smaller sprocket for a crisp shift response. Turned the other way the tooth would tend to push the chain back to the smaller sprocket.

If the sprockets are without built in spacers, and fit the spline, than they're usable. If either condition isn't met, they're not, though you might be able to work around the spacing issue.
Got it, thanks.
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