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-   -   I replaced tire and tube, without help or a stuggle, for the first time! (http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/935900-i-replaced-tire-tube-without-help-stuggle-first-time.html)

CenturionIM 02-26-14 09:41 PM

I replaced tire and tube, without help or a stuggle, for the first time!
 
I have never been a handy person. In fact I am known as the clumsy kid in my younger years. When I got into biking, all the DIYers here on BF and my inner cheapo convinced to try my hand at maintaining the bike myself. Alas, predictably I always struggle even with putting tire back on wheel after fixing a flat.

Putting back the last bit of tire is always a nightmare for me, even with tire levers! No matter what manual I read or what video I watch, somehow I just do not get the hang of it. Usually the struggle ends in me giving up after hours of struggle and seek help from this Co OP, where someone can give me some tips/helping hand.

Today I had another flat and I was dreading this moment of replacing the tube on my way home. As usual, the last bit of tire wipes its nose at me and refuse to go on. I took a deep breath, relax and resolve to do this alone; I just need more patience, that's all. When I put my hand to the tire I push them little by little, and before I knew it, the tire was back on! I look the wheel over and over to confirm it is on there. It only took 5 seconds on the second try! :lol:

Anyway pretty happy right now. I guess I am not completely hopeless yet...replacing the cable on my miyata next.

FBinNY 02-26-14 09:55 PM

It's amazing what you can do when you don't have a choice. Congrats, you're now liberated from flat tire fear.

Baytree 02-27-14 01:19 AM

Go you! Keep at it and you'll be doing all your own maintinence in no time.

My problem with flat tires has always been finding the hole. The only way I can do it is to stick the whole tube underwater in the sink... not too efficient on the road :P

J.Oxley 02-27-14 01:52 AM

NICE. Enjoy the victory, then build on it. :thumb:

10 Wheels 02-27-14 02:18 AM

Good Work...

Bandrada 02-27-14 08:35 AM

Thinking of changing a flat really elevates my blood pressure as well. Way to go!

RPK79 02-27-14 08:51 AM

Worst part of changing a flat, for me, is that it always seems to happen toward the end of along ride and my legs get stiff as I'm kneeling down. Some tire/rim combos are better than others. I just got some Continental Ultra Race Wires and they go on my Vuelta Corsa Pro wheels super smooth. Before that I had some Vittoria... Pros I think... and they were a bit of a pain to put on.

Wanderer 02-27-14 09:08 AM

For finding that hole - pump up the tube, and pass it by your lips................... works every time. You feel it blowing on your lips.

FBinNY 02-27-14 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baytree (Post 16531305)
...
My problem with flat tires has always been finding the hole. The only way I can do it is to stick the whole tube underwater in the sink... not too efficient on the road :P

Yes, this is why most experienced riders carry spare tubes. This spares us the need to find the leak on the road. OTOH it's still important to check the tire in case the offending object is still embedded there.

Bandrada 02-27-14 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16531903)
Yes, this is why most experienced riders carry spare tubes. This spares us the need to find the leak on the road. OTOH it's still important to check the tire in case the offending object is still embedded there.

I'd much rather take the time to patch a tube, even on the trail. Tubes are damn expensive these days and I can get patch kits in bulk.

FBinNY 02-27-14 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bandrada (Post 16532009)
I'd much rather take the time to patch a tube, even on the trail. Tubes are damn expensive these days and I can get patch kits in bulk.

I guess I should have completed the thought. You only buy one spare tube and carry that. But you don't discard the punctured tube. You put it into your bag, take it home and patch it at your leisure, then it becomes the spare.

So other than the initial spare, you're still patching and reusing tubes, the only difference is you're doing it at home instead of on the road, where it might be raining, cold or dark.

lopek77 02-27-14 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bandrada (Post 16532009)
I'd much rather take the time to patch a tube, even on the trail. Tubes are damn expensive these days and I can get patch kits in bulk.

It's only $5-$6, and around $3-$4 on sale at Performance Bike. It's not only cheap, but they are also a very good quality.
I always use corn starch when installing new tube. You can put the new tube in a zip lock bag, add some corn starch, shake it well and you done. It extends life of the tube, and since starch is all over the the rim when installing that tube - it's also easier to put tire back on the rim.

Bandrada 02-27-14 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16532016)
I guess I should have completed the thought. You only buy one spare tube and carry that. But you don't discard the punctured tube. You put it into your bag, take it home and patch it at your leisure, then it becomes the spare.

So other than the initial spare, you're still patching and reusing tubes, the only difference is you're doing it at home instead of on the road, where it might be raining, cold or dark.

Yes. All too often I see discarded tubes hanged on the side of the trail as if they are ornaments.

FBinNY 02-27-14 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bandrada (Post 16532055)
Yes. All too often I see discarded tubes hanged on the side of the trail as if they are ornaments.

This is simply proof that some people are pigs. Whether you decide to save or discard a punctured tube, there's no excuse for leaving it on the trail or road for someone else to clean up.

Mtn bikers should follow the rules of hikers, taking or leaving nothing but their experience.

rpenmanparker 02-27-14 11:03 AM

I've said it before. I will say it again. Get the VAR jacking tire tool. You will never fail or fear to fail in remounting a tire again. No matter how tight, it works every time. About $10 on the internet or specially ordered by your LBS. Don't change a tire without it.

FBinNY 02-27-14 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rpenmanparker (Post 16532170)
I've said it before. I will say it again. Get the VAR jacking tire tool. You will never fail or fear to fail in remounting a tire again. No matter how tight, it works every time. About $10 on the internet or specially ordered by your LBS. Don't change a tire without it.

Not knocking the tool, but why should the OP buy something he's proven to himself he doesn't need?

eja_ bottecchia 02-27-14 11:07 AM

Congrats...now for your next assignment: overhaul the bearings in your bike's BB. :thumb:

rpenmanparker 02-27-14 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16532175)
Not knocking the tool, but why should the OP buy something he's proven to himself he doesn't need?

I can mount some tires by thumbs alone and some not. I don't like worrying about next time. Why should he? I get no thrill from proving how strong my thumbs are. That's macho ka-ka. The object is to get the tire on plain and simple. If I had the choice of doing it by hand and winning some and losing some or giving up and using the tool every time, you can bet I would go for the latter. Different strokes for different folks. (BTW, a little "age-appropriate" arthritis may have a little something to do with my attitude although I have done it this way for a long, long time.)

bradtx 02-27-14 11:45 AM

CenturionIM, Good for you!

Brad

lopek77 02-27-14 11:46 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16532071)
This is simply proof that some people are pigs. Whether you decide to save or discard a punctured tube, there's no excuse for leaving it on the trail or road for someone else to clean up.

Mtn bikers should follow the rules of hikers, taking or leaving nothing but their experience.

I was a pig once. Hanged punctured tube, box and pop bottle on the tree next to the trail. I never saw that much broken glass anywhere else. Michigans MDOT forgot about that trail long time ago lol I sent bunch of pics to them after I came back home, and they took care of the whole trail the next year. It pays to do some research before you go that far away from home.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=366308

Bandrada 02-27-14 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lopek77 (Post 16532331)
I was a pig once. Hanged punctured tube, box and pop bottle on the tree next to the trail. I never saw that much broken glass anywhere else. Michigans MDOT forgot about that trail long time ago lol I sent bunch of pics to them after I came back home, and they took care of the whole trail the next year. It pays to do some research before you go that far away from home.

I admit that we had a break spot that became popular and we decided to "decorate" with beer cans. The idea was lost on most people, and quickly became a dump. Eventually, me and a few peeps cleaned the place up. Folks would still occasionally leave crap behind, probably out of habit, but we kept cleaning it up and it has all but stopped.

lopek77 02-27-14 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bandrada (Post 16532358)
I admit that we had a break spot that became popular and we decided to "decorate" with beer cans. The idea was lost on most people, and quickly became a dump. Eventually, me and a few peeps cleaned the place up. Folks would still occasionally leave crap behind, probably out of habit, but we kept cleaning it up and it has all but stopped.

Good deal. I always say I don't crap in my own living room, and trails are the extension of my living room lol I also volunteer and clean trails and parks, and it's so sad to see that people throw stuff everywhere in such a "natural" way like it's nothing wrong with it.

Bandrada 02-27-14 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lopek77 (Post 16532395)
Good deal. I always say I don't crap in my own living room, and trails are the extension of my living room lol I also volunteer and clean trails and parks, and it's so sad to see that people throw stuff everywhere in such a "natural" way like it's nothing wrong with it.

Very mature position. Good Onya!

scott967 02-28-14 04:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wanderer (Post 16531799)
For finding that hole - pump up the tube, and pass it by your lips................... works every time. You feel it blowing on your lips.

+1 on that. Once you hear it licking the tube will show you exactly (I have seen cases where you could sort of see it with the tube inflated, but once deflated you couldn't tell there was any hole unless you licked it). Sure at times it can be a PITA, but often a good excuse to relax, let the glue dry, mount and pump and get going again. (I ride solo so no issue of holding any one up.)

scott s.
.

arex 02-28-14 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lopek77 (Post 16532035)
It's only $5-$6, and around $3-$4 on sale at Performance Bike. It's not only cheap, but they are also a very good quality.
I always use corn starch when installing new tube. You can put the new tube in a zip lock bag, add some corn starch, shake it well and you done. It extends life of the tube, and since starch is all over the the rim when installing that tube - it's also easier to put tire back on the rim.

I prefer talc. Cornstarch tends to absorb moisture and cake up, and talc is slipperier.


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