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-   -   Looking for some advice for BICYCLE MECHANICS and applying for a BICYCLE SHOP (http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/936140-looking-some-advice-bicycle-mechanics-applying-bicycle-shop.html)

JesseMN 02-28-14 04:07 PM

Looking for some advice for BICYCLE MECHANICS and applying for a BICYCLE SHOP
 
Hello,
Looking for some advice. I will be receiving my PARK TOOL SCHOOL certificate in about 2 more weeks. I am really excited towards my journey to becoming a part/full time bicycle mechanic at a bicycle shop someday and crossing my fingers to go to another bicycle school in the near future. I am motivated and will never stop learning about bicycles. What's the next step?
Kindest Regards,
Jesse

RPK79 02-28-14 04:18 PM

Well, Erik's Bike and Board are hiring mechanics at all of their stores right now so I'd say start applying.

HillRider 02-28-14 05:20 PM

Next step? Apply for a job at what ever bike shops are with in commuting distance.

kingsting 02-28-14 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HillRider (Post 16536594)
Next step? Apply for a job at what ever bike shops are with in commuting distance.

And if you are located in an area with 4 seasons, do it soon! Bike shops want to hire before they get busy in the late spring. That way you can be trained with how things run in the shop and be up to speed by the time the rush hits...

Don't expect to be hidden in a back room fixing bikes all day. There is a lot more to working in a shop than just wrenching. Hopefully you have good people skills because you can expect a lot of face time with customers especially if the shop requires you to work the sales floor and run the register.

wheelreason 03-02-14 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JesseMN (Post 16536424)
What's the next step?

Public assistance, roommates, wealthy girlfriend...

mconlonx 03-02-14 09:48 AM

Get a bike job, any bike job.

If you have not already, evaluate your lifestyle and make sure it matches with expected wages. If not, seek another vocation or ratchet back your lifestyle to fit.

Work experience will be more relevant and attractive to potential employers than any bike school education or certificate. They don't hurt, but experience counts for more.

chriskmurray 03-02-14 10:09 AM

Not to try to sound harsh but every shop I have worked in we have struggled with people that have gone to bicycle repair schools (mostly Barnets because it is local). Mechanics from those schools had the confidence of a mechanic with 10 years experience but struggled to make it through a tune up in a timely fashion and still get all adjustments correct. They all had a bit of an ego and it got to the point we almost refused to hire anyone fresh out of a school if they showed any hint of an ego.

Drop off a resume at every shop in town, check back a few days to a week later. Go in very humble and tell them exactly where you are, you went to school but have no real experience but are excited to learn more. Chances are they will have you build a bike as a hands on interview or as you to do some repair task (each manager has there preferred task to test potential new guys). If you do not know how to do something PLEASE do not hesitate to ask. Asking how to do something would rarely disqualify a candidate but faking their way through a step would be an instant no go.

Expect to start by spending all day building bikes or cleaning bikes and it may be a while before you get into more in depth repairs or even a basic tune up, don't take that personal, if it is a shop that prides itself on its work they will want to make sure you have your skills dialed and have a good feel for the work you do before letting you loose on a customers bike.

On a more positive note, welcome to the industry, I have tried to leave a few times chasing better money and always come back despite the (relative) low pay and long hours. No other career path has made me as happy as the bike industry.

fietsbob 03-02-14 11:54 AM

In MN, you should also line up a winter job so as to have income ,
when the season of bike shops tapers off to near zero, and you get laid off.

Waiting tables and Bar tending may pay better , by having tips coming in from the customers.

JesseMN 03-02-14 11:57 AM

Thanks for the advice everyone.
Kindest Regards,
Jesse

FBinNY 03-02-14 03:36 PM

The next step is very easy, but could be a big help in landing a job. Add your city of residence to your profile. You never know but somebody here may know of a shop near you that's looking for a mechanic, or simply hiring for the season.

But since nobody knows where you live, you'll never get that specific referral.

NICBIKE 03-02-14 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wheelreason (Post 16540769)
Public assistance, roommates, wealthy girlfriend...

this

JesseMN 03-03-14 01:17 PM

I live in Hollister, California. I am close to Santa Cruz, Watsonville, Salinas and Monterey need be.

TallRider 03-03-14 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JesseMN (Post 16544558)
I live in Hollister, California. I am close to Santa Cruz, Watsonville, Salinas and Monterey need be.

as @FBinNY said, add this information to your profile here on bikeforums


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