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Old 03-01-14, 12:24 PM   #1
jawnn
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Ski wax for chain????

I need a ski wax for the outside of my chain. I have been using Chain L and I finally had some bad rain that rusted the out side of my chain badly, and it started making noise. I don't want to add more chain L every time it rains.

I need something that will keep the outer sides from rusting yet not sink into the links.

I had some long ago, but I don't know what kind would stick to metal and not collect dirt. And is there a kind that does not need to be heated first?

Then I am thinking abut how it may just scrape off...I need to talk to some one that has tryed it.

Last edited by jawnn; 03-01-14 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 03-01-14, 01:03 PM   #2
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use LPS-3
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Old 03-01-14, 02:04 PM   #3
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I used to use canning paraffin and melt it in a double boiler. It ran very quiet, but did not protect the chain from corrosion (sea air). The best application for this process (years ago) was in door track bike racing.
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Old 03-01-14, 02:06 PM   #4
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consider a nickel plated chain next. so the steel has plating on it.

but that act of applying oil regularly to the chain should be sufficient,

rust is an indication you let it go too long between oilings.
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Old 03-01-14, 02:23 PM   #5
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Rust on the outside of the plates doesn't affect anything but aesthetics. Just lube and wipe as you normally would, then go ride it. Shifting up and down the cassette will do a sufficient job of scraping off any surface rust.
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Old 03-01-14, 05:47 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Rust on the outside of the plates doesn't affect anything but aesthetics. .....
It's a question of degree. Years ago there was plenty of reserve in plate thickness and strength, and quite a bit of rust was OK. Today's plates are much thinner, and have much less strength reserve, so someone who's harder on chains, ie. a heavy strong rider, climbs steep hills, or sprints high gears has little room for strength loss to rust.

Does this mean panic over shallow cosmetic rust, not at all. My winter chains all have minor rusting at the edges of the plates, where the oil film is wiped off the most, or gets scrubbed off by salt spray. I also forgive minor rust spots here and there. But I don't let the chain continue to rust.
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Old 03-01-14, 08:03 PM   #7
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Well today was in the low 30s so i opted for purple over a base of blue special. Tomorrow will be an all blue special day being in the mid 20s. Oh wait you must mean alpine ski wax... Andy.
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Old 03-02-14, 11:31 AM   #8
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Personally I find Chain L to be one of the better lubes at protecting against rust and solid wax to one of the worst. Years ago I used the old hot wax treatment using a couple of bike specific waxes and a few concoctions of my own with different lubes added. None of them held up well in the wet and applying unmelted wax would seem to be even less effective along with the difficulty of trying to spread the wax in all the crevices of the outside of a chain. Wax buildup is also a PITA to remove and If I recall I had to use a brush and then gasoline to get it off. Having said all that I think the only way to find out for sure is to just try it and if it doesn't work try something else. I think the pro racer mechanics just use a thin layer of grease on the outside of the chains on wet days.
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Old 03-02-14, 12:54 PM   #9
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Seriously, I make and use Chain-L and am familiar with it's limitations. The viscosity needed for it to function as a good lube and not bind the chain, means it's vulnerable to scrub off by wheel spray, especially salt water and slush.

If I made it thicker, it would be too gooey and stiffen the chain causing skipping. So my suggestion of LPS-3 which is much thicker and dries to a wax like paste about the consistency of peanut butter. It's designed as a heavy duty bare metal protectant like cosmoline, and as long as it's applied after oiling the chain will not wick in and cause problems.

The downside is that it will make it harder to reoil the chain as it tends to close the gaps. Therefore I only use it for harsh wet winter conditions.

When the time comes, OMS or naphtha will remove both LPS-3 and Chain-L, though you'll need a longer soak time than usual.
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Old 03-02-14, 11:30 PM   #10
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Anybody else brew there own chain lube?

I've tried all the name brands and can't tell the difference.
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Old 03-03-14, 12:41 PM   #11
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This looks like I should just rub it on, Batter than spry on that will get in where I don't want it. I suppose that all these remain sticky?
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Old 03-03-14, 03:11 PM   #12
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[TABLE="class: specs"]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]I have used Maxima Chain Wax on my bicycles and road racing motorcycles for years. It has a solvent component that allows it to penetrate deeply like a liquid during application, but if you apply it a few hours before your ride, the paraffin base "dries" to a waxy state and prevents it from flinging off. NO mess. It is QUIET and SMOOTH. Can be stripped off easily with any mild solvent for a thorough cleaning by hand or submersion.

http://www.maximausa.com/shopping/in...products_id=28

Quote:
Maxima Chain Wax is a superior power spray lubricant designed for all chain care needs. It’s special ParaFilm™ formula creates a waxy film similar to Cosmoline, offering long term protection especially in water and high humidity environments. Maxima Chain Wax is formulated with heavy duty, anti-wear, and extreme pressure additives that provide superior lubrication for all chains, cables, and sprockets. Maxima Chain Wax penetrates deeply, lubricating non accessible areas, reducing chain stretch and wear. Chain Wax is simply the best choice for all chain and cable care needs

Eliminates “fling off” & seals lubricant to chain[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]Special paraffin base creates waxy film[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]Excellent rust protection[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]For o-ring and conventional chains[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]Does not attract dirt[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 100%"]Light amber color[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

Last edited by SquidPuppet; 03-03-14 at 03:15 PM.
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