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  1. #1
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    Trying to put together a 2004 stump jumper FSR, Please help

    Hi, I am new to the community and I just traded up for a 2004 stump jumper FSR bare frame.

    I understand it is old and went to my local bike store or LBS? and asked questions. The gentleman told me it would basically take about 1,000 to put together yet he didn't recommend it because it was a 26inch wheel size and that it was too slow for todays 29 inch sizes. I am trying to shop around for all the components and pieces for the bike even if used for half that amount.. I also need help to learn how to put together.

    If anyone would be willing to help guide/direct and also trade some of their components for items I may have or services I can offer from my company as a motion graphic artist, graphic designer, photographer, cinematographer.

    Thank you for your time in advance.

  2. #2
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    Whether 26" or a 29er is faster is very much dependent on the type of terrain you're riding in.
    Putting a bike together from a bare frame can be very rewarding - if the frame is sized right for you - but is usually also more expensive than buying a complete bike.

    On bikepedia.com you can probably find the original spec of your bike.
    Sheldonbrown.com and parktool.com has loads of repair and assembly instructions.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabac View Post
    Whether 26" or a 29er is faster is very much dependent on the type of terrain you're riding in.
    Putting a bike together from a bare frame can be very rewarding - if the frame is sized right for you - but is usually also more expensive than buying a complete bike.

    On bikepedia.com you can probably find the original spec of your bike.
    Sheldonbrown.com and parktool.com has loads of repair and assembly instructions.

    Yea I understand the work and that it may be more expensive but I figured I would like to build up to enjoy the reward of doing it as well as being able to learn about its mechanics fully. Thank you I will definitely go to those sites to read up

  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    26" is fine I have 2 26" wheel bikes . IDK what you want to do .

    dabac is right if you want to return your bike , collector like , to original components ..

    searching out them on Ebay ..


    I cannot physically help you build your bike Up. maybe there is another bike shop that will do a trade
    in exchange for doing a commercial for TV and laying out ad copy for them ..,

    but that would be local, so You have to sort that out where you live , wherever that is..

    General bike repair books are on the shelves at the library ..

    velo news press publishes Lennard Zinn's mountain bike repair books ,
    he writes a column for their web and paper magazine.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    26" is fine I have 2 26" wheel bikes . IDK what you want to do .

    dabac is right if you want to return your bike , collector like , to original components ..

    searching out them on Ebay ..


    I cannot physically help you build your bike Up. maybe there is another bike shop that will do a trade
    in exchange for doing a commercial for TV and laying out ad copy for them ..,

    but that would be local, so You have to sort that out where you live , wherever that is..

    General bike repair books are on the shelves at the library ..

    velo news press publishes Lennard Zinn's mountain bike repair books ,
    he writes a column for their web and paper magazine.

    Thank you, yea I plan to do some trails and a lot of road too. In terms of bringing back to original it would be nice, yet I am also content with putting suitable components into the bike. I am located in Miami, FL. Great I will look into those books and web info

  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    If you dont have the fork consider it. a big expense.
    as top line Suspension fork costs more than many people pay for a whole bike ,

    dual suspension Off road bike is not so good on the road and you dont have any mountains in Miami,
    so it may be the wrong bike project for where you live, to pour money into .. like it's a Boat. .
    and it should come as no surprise how much $ a Boat* absorbs

    rear pivot bearings go out and there you need someone that knows pressing in new bearings .

    * boat .. break out another thousand

    Note: sticker shock on suspension forks
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...er=price_desc#
    Last edited by fietsbob; 03-11-14 at 05:17 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    If you dont have the fork consider it. a big expense.
    as top line Suspension fork costs more than many people pay for a whole bike ,

    dual suspension Off road bike is not so good on the road and you dont have any mountains in Miami,
    so it may be the wrong bike project for where you live, to pour money into .. like it's a Boat. .
    and it should come as no surprise how much $ a Boat* absorbs

    rear pivot bearings go out and there you need someone that knows pressing in new bearings .

    * boat .. break out another thousand

    Yea, Im considering it, doing homework still and reading up, I might consider a hard tail since I will mainly be on the road. I still want to build this one though to enjoy learning and doing it. I'm estimating if I can find decent deals I can spend about 500 into it, not sure though.. or focus on just getting a road bike and this project be my trail bike..

  8. #8
    Rides Majestic
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    My advice is to find a vintage mountain bike that was better than entry level. Look for something from the mid 90's with an aluminum frame and 1 1/8" headset. You can often find some nice bikes for around $100-$150. If you are careful, and select a bike with minimal wear, you can transfer the parts to your frame.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by likebike23 View Post
    My advice is to find a vintage mountain bike that was better than entry level. Look for something from the mid 90's with an aluminum frame and 1 1/8" headset. You can often find some nice bikes for around $100-$150. If you are careful, and select a bike with minimal wear, you can transfer the parts to your frame.
    That is one of my thoughts yet I do not want to go that low in price range/quality.. I have been looking for posts/people that also have older stump jumpers parted out in small and large portions, I am not picky in terms of it being used yet I would prefer it to not be too old technology.. again I understand it has to be within reason of my budget for this project..

  10. #10
    Senior Member clydeosaur's Avatar
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    likebike23 has a good idea. You have a 9speed bike shimano equipped bike with a 100 mm/120mm fork and same for the rear shock. 1 1/8 threadless steerer Stock crank was a Specialized house brand triple, but many run shimano, trutaviv, etc... You have probably have the option of standard linear brakes or disc (look for bosses on the frame). If you run discs, you obviously need disc wheels to accommodate. Seat post is a 31.6. I have an '03.

  11. #11
    Senior Member clydeosaur's Avatar
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  12. #12
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Sometimes some outstanding deals can fall in your lap for LOW $$$.
    My brother found my 86 Rockhopper for $50. The ad simply said "mountain bike $50".
    It didn't even have a paint chip! (then)
    Cassette, Free Hub & rims had been upgraded.

  13. #13
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    I just upgraded the parts on my '90 Trek 7000. I used a mix of XT and plain Deore parts, going with mostly the latest. I didn't do a fork nor a crank, and those 2 can start to cost. I'm about $500 in at this point, with dynamo wheels, XT v-brakes, Deore levers and shifters, XT M786 rear derailleur, chain, cassette. The dynamo wheel and light cost around $250 on their own, so the rest is another 250.

    So add fork, crank, BB, bars, stem, seatpost, saddle. That'll eat up another $700 or so for decent parts. You could go the China route and order carbon Fork/Bars/Stem/Seat Post as a unit as I've seen advertised. It looks like nice stuff and it costs a fraction of brand name gear. For BB/Cranks I'd stick with Shimano, XT if you can find it cheap. Everything I bought at rock bottom prices from eBay, Amazon, Jenson, Backcountry, Cambria, UniversalCycles. Watch for free shipping as that can start to add up.

    Excel will be your friend. Create a worksheet of what you can find at the lowest prices including shipping. Add it all up. Make sure when you buy shifters/levers it includes the cables, make sure your brakes include pads, make sure your hubs include the skewers.

    If you go the Chinese parts route, take a look at the carbon frames too, they are pretty cheap.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jau0321 View Post
    That is one of my thoughts yet I do not want to go that low in price range/quality.. I have been looking for posts/people that also have older stump jumpers parted out in small and large portions, I am not picky in terms of it being used yet I would prefer it to not be too old technology.. again I understand it has to be within reason of my budget for this project..
    I'm not sure where you are located, but in my area $150 can get you a nice bike with LX derailleurs/shifters/cranks, decent wheels, stem/bars, seat post, saddle, etc. If $500 is your budget, you may be better off in terms of cost to pick up a more modern bike, buying parts piecemeal can be expensive. I found a few in my area in 10 minutes:
    2006 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR
    GIANT freeride/downhill/dirtjump
    Jamis Dakat Xlt

  15. #15
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    So what do you have now? Frame, frame and fork, any additional parts? Without parts at your disposal, buying everything new, it will indeed be very expensive and still probably not that great of a bike.

    Some of the MAJOR expenses, if you want to use decent parts:
    - Fork
    - Crankset
    - Shifters
    - Wheelset
    - Brakes, if they're disc.

    Then add in all the little stuff like headset, spacers, stem, bars, grips, seatpost, seatpost collar, saddle, cables/housing, FD, RD, chain, cassette, tires, tubes, pedals, and you've got a small fortune stuck into an old FSR.

    You can get the same rewarding learning experience buying a complete used bike and tearing it down and rebuilding it. Then at least you have all the parts. Anytime I get a bike I'm going to use for myself now it gets torn down to the bare frame, cleaned, and rebuilt properly. Part of it is OCD and the other part is that virtually every bike I come across needs this service done.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  16. #16
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    Thank you everyone, yea I have been looking online and I did saw some older model 03 and a 06 stump jumpers full for about 200-600 price range in great condition and complete so that might be my direction. I know I can get a new bike for about 500, a hard rock hard tail, etc.. my question now is if I am able to get one of these older bikes at a great price is it worth it.. like some have said here for an old FSR or will my ride be that much better/faster for a newer 26 wheel size bike?

    i don't want to invest too much in a bike that I won't be able to enjoy or be drastically slow on.. but I also want to enjoy it as a project, not dump a lot and ride hard I feel if i can get one complete for 300 and swap out what i want/dont want it'll be worth it..

    also, I found a 06 rockhopper comp for a great price in great condition size is 17 medium and a 100lb travel front fork is it worth swapping out all its components onto my 04 stump jumper or even doable? (I'm sure theres a thread already on this or questions but I am new to this site and still navigating myself around to look and learn)..

    Thanks again everyone!
    and correction its a stump jumper FSR pro, not sure if it makes a difference..
    Last edited by jau0321; 03-12-14 at 12:56 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by clydeosaur View Post
    likebike23 has a good idea. You have a 9speed bike shimano equipped bike with a 100 mm/120mm fork and same for the rear shock. 1 1/8 threadless steerer Stock crank was a Specialized house brand triple, but many run shimano, trutaviv, etc... You have probably have the option of standard linear brakes or disc (look for bosses on the frame). If you run discs, you obviously need disc wheels to accommodate. Seat post is a 31.6. I have an '03.
    that bike looks great! how do you like it? of course newer bikes is a huge difference but for the price i would think its still a great bike? yea i was looking at my frame and it appears to be in mint condition and it does allow for v brakes or disc brakes. I would like to go with disc brakes for better stopping power.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
    So what do you have now? Frame, frame and fork, any additional parts? Without parts at your disposal, buying everything new, it will indeed be very expensive and still probably not that great of a bike.

    Some of the MAJOR expenses, if you want to use decent parts:
    - Fork
    - Crankset
    - Shifters
    - Wheelset
    - Brakes, if they're disc.

    Then add in all the little stuff like headset, spacers, stem, bars, grips, seatpost, seatpost collar, saddle, cables/housing, FD, RD, chain, cassette, tires, tubes, pedals, and you've got a small fortune stuck into an old FSR.

    You can get the same rewarding learning experience buying a complete used bike and tearing it down and rebuilding it. Then at least you have all the parts. Anytime I get a bike I'm going to use for myself now it gets torn down to the bare frame, cleaned, and rebuilt properly. Part of it is OCD and the other part is that virtually every bike I come across needs this service done.
    I know what you mean and the gentleman at my local store said the same, new parts would run easily at 1-1,500 and that it wasn't worth it, to might as well purchase a new one, yet I don't want to spend that much on a bike.. I need to basically get everything you listed lol so that was my thought on getting a deal or bike similar to mine in age or newer to try and swap out the frame or just keep that bike intact if its a better bike and frame overall... I just liked this frame design, color, and being OCD also being able to clean and rebuild.

  19. #19
    Senior Member clydeosaur's Avatar
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    that bike looks great! how do you like it? of course newer bikes is a huge difference but for the price i would think its still a great bike? yea i was looking at my frame and it appears to be in mint condition and it does allow for v brakes or disc brakes. I would like to go with disc brakes for better stopping power.
    It's been a great bike. I bought it 5 years ago for adventure races / mtn. trails from a guy who bought it new with the idea he was going to get into riding/racing. I swear the bike had 3 rides on it. I upgraded wheels & saddle. Other than that, I just ride it. I'm sure the newer bikes are "better", but be assured this will not hold you back.

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