Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central CT USA
    My Bikes
    1991 Tomassini Prestige 1973 Raliegh Supercourse, 1975 Panasonic Sport Deluxe, 1983 Fuji S-12, 1975 Motobecane Mirage, 1983 Motobecane Super Mirage 1999 Trek 930 1989 Trek 930 ,
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Alternative tube patch cements

    Are there any other types of cements that will work other than the usual patch-kit rubber cement? (usually it's Rax or that German brand )

    Weldwood contact cement? Duco Cement?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    20,465
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Patch kit cement isn't cement or glue in the traditional sense, it's vulcanizing compound.

    Tire patches use a 2 part system, analogous to a two part epoxy. One part is the preparation you apply after scraping, which when dried (important) leaves the tube ready to react with the second part which is part of the patch. When done right a permanent bond is made between the patch and tube.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #3
    "LOGIC!" lopek77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    SE MICHIGAN
    My Bikes
    10 Specialized Crosstrail, 09 Raleigh Mojave 5.0, 70's Panasonic DX-2000, 70's Schwinn world traveler (originally owned by Prady family - "The Big Bang Theory") , 96 Mongoose switchback, 80's Romet Wigry 2, 80's Romet Wigry 3, Romet Pelikan...
    Posts
    997
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you want to patch a small puncture in the tube, that is really easy and quick to do it, try Park Tools GP-2. They seem to last forever on a patched tubes. Some say that it's just a temporary fix, but I have a tube with 3 of them for the last 3 years or so, and with around 9k miles on it. They still hold strong.
    "The clear problem of the outlawing of insult is that too many things can be interpreted as such. Criticism, ridicule, sarcasm, merely stating an alternative point of view to the orthodoxy, can be interpreted as insult."
    Reading without understanding is useless

    "Some readers may characterize a post as trolling, while others may regard the same post as a legitimate contribution to the discussion, even if controversial." - go figure lol

    Cycling Videos

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,394
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Slime brand cement that is readily available works well for me with the Rema patches. I think it must be "proper" patch cement, I can't pull up the edge of a patch after it has set.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,161
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
    The Slime brand cement that is readily available works well for me with the Rema patches. I think it must be "proper" patch cement, I can't pull up the edge of a patch after it has set.
    While they indeed call it "cement", it isn't "cement" as the rest of the glue and adhesive industry think of it.
    It is a vulcanizing compound, so it's the right stuff for the job even if they've chosen to stick a silly name on it.

    My bet is that they've gone with a more familiar name, even if it's technically inaccurate, for the sake of making the use of the product more self-explanatory.
    There are probably far more people around who'd understand what a cement is used for than people who'd know what to do with vulcanizing fluid/compound/solution.

    A simple test would be to try to glue anything else than a patch with it.
    If it's really a cement, I'd expect it to have some sort of adhesive properties even in other combinations of materials.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,394
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This may be a good time to mention that you can buy a lifetime supply of Rema patches, the small ones that fit a road tube, for about $20 on ebay. Very few folks I ride with will use a patched tube. They give me their flats, I patch them and offer them to the group. Rarely are there takers. I have LOTS of tubes....

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Middle of the road, NJ
    Posts
    2,143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by IknowURider View Post
    Weldwood contact cement?
    I ran out of regular patching cement, and tried contact cement. It didn't work very well.
    If you don't know the way, you shouldn't be going there.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,412
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use Napa Heavy Duty Vulcanizing Cement. Works great, big can was around $8-12 I guess. It's the real deal, glue sniffers would like it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,402
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Despite not being a true vulcanizing fluid and not actually reacting with the patches and tubes, I've had excellent luck using plain old "Elmer's Rubber Cement" from any office supply or X-mart. I scuff the area around the puncture with sand paper, wipe it clean and apply a thin layer of the rubber cement extending over a bit larger area than the patch will cover. Let the cement dry completely then apply the patch and iron it down with firm thumb pressure. Patched this way I've had excellent results and almost no failures. Perhaps it's not the right cement but it really does work.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jed19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,745
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
    This may be a good time to mention that you can buy a lifetime supply of Rema patches, the small ones that fit a road tube, for about $20 on ebay. Very few folks I ride with will use a patched tube. They give me their flats, I patch them and offer them to the group. Rarely are there takers. I have LOTS of tubes....
    Yep! I sprung for one of that and an 8oz Rema Vulcanising fluid. Between my bikes and my son's bike (a true flat-magnet, as he won't pump his tires up, despite my constant text messages/reminders to do so), have not regretted the purchase one bit.
    Regards,

    Jed

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,969
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can but the Slime patch compound at any auto supply house in an 8ounce can with brush.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,259
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Despite not being a true vulcanizing fluid and not actually reacting with the patches and tubes, I've had excellent luck using plain old "Elmer's Rubber Cement" from any office supply or X-mart. I scuff the area around the puncture with sand paper, wipe it clean and apply a thin layer of the rubber cement extending over a bit larger area than the patch will cover. Let the cement dry completely then apply the patch and iron it down with firm thumb pressure. Patched this way I've had excellent results and almost no failures. Perhaps it's not the right cement but it really does work.
    I've used regular rubber cement, and had failures. The patches creeped off the hole. That was on skinny tubes, in fairly high pressure road tires. That never, ever, ever happens with vulcanizing fluid. I keep a jar of fluid, which I buy from the auto parts store, at work and home, and use that when patching. It's about six bucks a can, which if you can screw the top on, will last a couple years of occasional use, or a few hundred patches if you're busy. (plain rubber cement costs $3 for a bottle that's half the size, so it's not any cheaper. Might have some somewhere, of course which would get you home, but it won't save you much money.)

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    northern Deep South
    My Bikes
    Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
    Posts
    1,771
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Despite not being a true vulcanizing fluid and not actually reacting with the patches and tubes, I've had excellent luck using plain old "Elmer's Rubber Cement" from any office supply or X-mart. I scuff the area around the puncture with sand paper, wipe it clean and apply a thin layer of the rubber cement extending over a bit larger area than the patch will cover. Let the cement dry completely then apply the patch and iron it down with firm thumb pressure. Patched this way I've had excellent results and almost no failures. Perhaps it's not the right cement but it really does work.
    +1

    My Rema patch cement dried out half way down the can, and did you know it's really hard to get trichlor nowadays? I've been using Elmer's for three years now, probably patched a dozen times or more with the stuff, and (knock on wood) haven't had a patch fail yet. This is on tubes usually pumped to 85-95 psi.

    Hillrider's right about the prep, too. It's critical to sand way more than you want to to get below the mold release.

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,795
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can also buy case lots of the little Rema tubes of the fluid ,

    so unopened, the other ones wont evaporate the solvents..

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,402
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
    I've used regular rubber cement, and had failures. The patches creeped off the hole. That was on skinny tubes, in fairly high pressure road tires. That never, ever, ever happens with vulcanizing fluid. I keep a jar of fluid, which I buy from the auto parts store, at work and home, and use that when patching. It's about six bucks a can, which if you can screw the top on, will last a couple years of occasional use, or a few hundred patches if you're busy. (plain rubber cement costs $3 for a bottle that's half the size, so it's not any cheaper. Might have some somewhere, of course which would get you home, but it won't save you much money.)
    My "Elmer's" cement is used on 700-23 tires and tubes run at 105-120 psi so high pressure isn't necessarily a cause of failures. Also, yes Elmers comes in 4-oz bottles at about $2 each but it serves several purposes other than tube patching so its cost compared to vulcanizing cement isn't the issue. We use it up before it dries out.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3,928
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    My "Elmer's" cement is used on 700-23 tires and tubes run at 105-120 psi so high pressure isn't necessarily a cause of failures. Also, yes Elmers comes in 4-oz bottles at about $2 each but it serves several purposes other than tube patching so its cost compared to vulcanizing cement isn't the issue. We use it up before it dries out.
    I seem to remember it could be used to make great fake boogers the size of a marble.

    Oh to be 8 again.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,412
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    My "Elmer's" cement is used on 700-23 tires and tubes run at 105-120 psi so high pressure isn't necessarily a cause of failures. Also, yes Elmers comes in 4-oz bottles at about $2 each but it serves several purposes other than tube patching so its cost compared to vulcanizing cement isn't the issue. We use it up before it dries out.
    I had marginal results with Elmers, Real vulcanizing cement is better IMO, almost impossible to pull the patch off.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,402
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I had marginal results with Elmers, Real vulcanizing cement is better IMO, almost impossible to pull the patch off.
    I'm not claiming that "real" vulcanizing cement isn't better. I'm only reporting my experience that Elmer's has been satisfactory. I really don't care if I can pull off the patch as long as the tube doesn't leak.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,412
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    I'm not claiming that "real" vulcanizing cement isn't better. I'm only reporting my experience that Elmer's has been satisfactory. I really don't care if I can pull off the patch as long as the tube doesn't leak.
    I care if the tube leaks also, thus my comment about the marginal performance of Elmers as a patch cement.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central CT USA
    My Bikes
    1991 Tomassini Prestige 1973 Raliegh Supercourse, 1975 Panasonic Sport Deluxe, 1983 Fuji S-12, 1975 Motobecane Mirage, 1983 Motobecane Super Mirage 1999 Trek 930 1989 Trek 930 ,
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I use Napa Heavy Duty Vulcanizing Cement. Works great, big can was around $8-12 I guess. It's the real deal, glue sniffers would like it.
    Bingo. Cool. We have a Napa here.

    Can you walk in and buy some, or do they have to ID you and "special order" it?

    (sigh) Another hassle thanks to the crystal-meth heads.
    Last edited by IknowURider; 04-04-14 at 05:37 AM. Reason: added more content

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central CT USA
    My Bikes
    1991 Tomassini Prestige 1973 Raliegh Supercourse, 1975 Panasonic Sport Deluxe, 1983 Fuji S-12, 1975 Motobecane Mirage, 1983 Motobecane Super Mirage 1999 Trek 930 1989 Trek 930 ,
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Despite not being a true vulcanizing fluid and not actually reacting with the patches and tubes, I've had excellent luck using plain old "Elmer's Rubber Cement" from any office supply or X-mart. I scuff the area around the puncture with sand paper, wipe it clean and apply a thin layer of the rubber cement extending over a bit larger area than the patch will cover. Let the cement dry completely then apply the patch and iron it down with firm thumb pressure. Patched this way I've had excellent results and almost no failures. Perhaps it's not the right cement but it really does work.
    very cool, I always wanted to try that

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Slightly off topic: I have lots of left over patches, what I don't have is any extra of those small glue tubes that dry out after opening. Spending $3-4 for a patch kit seems wasteful when all I need is the glue tube.

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Kissimmee, FL
    My Bikes
    2002 Specialized Allez
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can get a good sized tube of the real deal vulcanizing fluid at any auto parts store or big box store for about 2 bucks. Look where they have the auto tire repair kits.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
    My Bikes
    86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
    Posts
    6,886
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sails View Post
    Slightly off topic: I have lots of left over patches, what I don't have is any extra of those small glue tubes that dry out after opening. Spending $3-4 for a patch kit seems wasteful when all I need is the glue tube.
    You can buy small tubes of Rema "glue" on Amazon etc.
    Just pick up a couple when you make some other bike order to save on shipping.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sails View Post
    Slightly off topic: I have lots of left over patches, what I don't have is any extra of those small glue tubes that dry out after opening. Spending $3-4 for a patch kit seems wasteful when all I need is the glue tube.
    You can make those tubes of vulcanizing fluid last longer by rolling them up as you use them to force out any air before screwing the cap on. It's usually the air trapped inside that will dry them out.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •