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  1. #26
    Senior Member
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    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
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    I too have Litage forks on both my road bike, and my mtn bike/commuter. I've also ridden top end steel forks from Reynolds and Columbus for decades, and can say the Litage road fork rides as nicely as the steel ones in every respect. (I don't have a decent basis of comparison for the mtn/commuter fork, but I've very happy with it.

    I have about as much concern for their safety as I do stepping into a Boeing aircraft.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  2. #27
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post

    The only area where aluminum is questionable is in steerer tubes, especially 1" ones. But most (all?) reputable makers of aluminum forks use a steel steerer, so there's no need to debate.
    ...for some strange reason, aluminum steerer tubes still show up in production bikes and cause some issues:

    Felt Bicycles recalls road bikes due to aluminum steerer tube failures - VeloNews.com

    http://www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/...ug%202012).pdf
    Quote Originally Posted by Terrierman View Post
    No wonder everybody hates you.

  3. #28
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Had 2 Italian AlAn supers.. 100% aluminum , they go in collectors desired lists even now..

    CX racing it was The Bike .. a while ago .. world championships won riding them ..

  4. #29
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surreal View Post
    While aluminum forks have come a long way, and we shouldn't generalize based on one poor example, there was a thing nicknamed the "Death Fork" on Viscount and Lambert bikes. It was made of cast aluminum, and it was notorious for premature failure.
    To be fair, the problem with the Lambert/Viscount fork wasn't the aluminum casting, but rather the means by which it was attached to the steel steer tube. As noted elsewhere above, proper design can make an aluminum fork as safe, comfortable, and reliable as any other material.

  5. #30
    Senior Member
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    SF Bay Area
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    Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)
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    Older (~90s) Specialized Allez and Trek's had Al forks standard. It wasn't until the mid-2000s that Al frame + CF fork became standard for entry level bikes. There must have been millions of forks sold like that. Total non-issue.

  6. #31
    Senior Member Shimagnolo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jed19 View Post
    I have a 1994 Cannondale Killer V900 hard-tail mountain bike that came with a beefy aluminum fork called the Pepperoni. I bent it when a drunken teenager plowed into me one July 4 on a beach trail. I was lucky to find another Pepperoni fork (exactly same color and steerer size) at an old Cannondale dealership.

    The real interesting thing about the Pepperoni is that it is kinda overbuilt.
    My '94 C'dale M700 has one of those.
    I bought it new, and at this point the frame, fork, and handlebar are the only remaining original parts.

  7. #32
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    Both of your quotes/articles are 5-6 years old. Haven't seen any problems since then from any manufactor. Might be some but doesn't seem to be a problem now.


    Quote Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
    ...for some strange reason, aluminum steerer tubes still show up in production bikes and cause some issues:

    Felt Bicycles recalls road bikes due to aluminum steerer tube failures - VeloNews.com

    http://www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/...ug%202012).pdf

  8. #33
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drturf View Post
    Both of your quotes/articles are 5-6 years old. Haven't seen any problems since then from any manufactor. Might be some but doesn't seem to be a problem now.
    ...no offense, but where do you think all those problem bikes went exactly ?

    I see aluminum steerer tubes that come in on used bikes infrequently, but enough to worry about them.
    And the second link stated that the bikes in question might have been sold up until 2012.


    Again, I realize this is teh Biekforums, and you score points for this kinda stuff. I'm just trying to get the word out.
    Quote Originally Posted by Terrierman View Post
    No wonder everybody hates you.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
    I see aluminum steerer tubes that come in on used bikes infrequently, but enough to worry about them.
    There are TONS of bikes out there whose carbon forks have aluminum steering tubes, two of my bikes among them. If there was a widespread problem with aluminum steering tubes in general, I'm confident there would be some awareness of the issue on these forums. In the meantime, I plan to keep riding mine worry-free.

  10. #35
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    ....good for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Terrierman View Post
    No wonder everybody hates you.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Jed19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
    My '94 C'dale M700 has one of those.
    I bought it new, and at this point the frame, fork, and handlebar are the only remaining original parts.
    Yeah, I bought mine new too. The only original parts still left are the frame, headset and the cantilever brakes. Everything else has been changed. i have a real sentimental attachment to the bike. I think I paid either a little bit short of or a little bit more than a thousand dollars for it, and I just can't bring myself to sell it. Was once offered $250 for it.

    The real interesting thing is that it was not the bike I wanted at that time. I really wanted Cannondale's Delta V (which had a rear suspension), but the price was just more than I wanted to spend. Now that I use my killer V hardtail as a kind of leisure/picnic bike, I thank serendipity for making me chose the Killer V, as I could have stretched a little bit to buy the Delta V. And a bike with dual suspension is just not gonna work for the purposes I now use the bike for.
    Last edited by Jed19; 04-07-14 at 11:03 AM.
    Regards,

    Jed

  12. #37
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    I had a fork break at the steerer tube, it was a steel fork, and steerer. It was a cheap deptment store bike. I now have a bike with an AL fork, and have never given it a second thought.
    My neighbor is an automechanic. He sometimes works on his buddys ARCA race car. I was shot the breeze with him one day, and saw the drivers seat frame. I asked if it was cro-mo, figeuring that would be the best material in the drivers last line of defense. Nope, it was AL, very thick wall tubing. And it was pretty heavy. Even with the thickness of the tubing, it was still lighter than steel, and offered the same protection.
    If you don't know the way, you shouldn't be going there.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    fear of a bike just because a certain part is made from a certain material
    comes from ignorance
    and nothing else

    the myth that steel always makes a part stronger is just that
    a myth
    but it is often repeated
    and so often believed

    but in the real world
    almost every bike from bsos just above the bottom end
    to bike shop bikes just below all carbon
    are now made from aluminum
    and have been for fifteen years or so

    the fact of the matter is
    thousands and thousands of bikes have full aluminum forks
    or forks with aluminum steerer tubes bonded to something else
    and there simply has not been a rash of broken forks

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