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Old 04-12-14, 07:16 AM   #1
Gege-Bubu
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Building new bike. Need instructions

Finally all the parts have arrived and I am ready to build my new bike tomorrow.

I need to know in what order I put the parts and component on, something like step by step guide

This is my plan:

1. Headset bearings

1a. Protective film on chainstay drive side

1b. Bottom bracket

2. Brakes Front and Rear

3. Fork

3a. Handle bar, shifters, brake levers (TT)

3b. Crankset

4. FD and chain catcher

5. RD

6. Run cable housings (internal cables)

7. Wheels

8. Cables

9. Seatpost/Saddle

10. Adjust headset if needed

11. Adjust brakes

12. Adjust RD and FD


What do you think about my plan? What would you do differently and why?

Thanks!
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Old 04-12-14, 07:22 AM   #2
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#6 : Unless you are certain the internal cables have guide tubes in the frame, I'd run the internal cable housings before installing the bottom bracket, fork or seatpost. You may have to get your fingers into the downtube, toptube or headtube to guide the housing and you want access to these tube ends. Also,#2 and #3 , why install the front brake before you install the fork?
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Old 04-12-14, 07:25 AM   #3
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Your close eneugh on your order I would likely do the Headset fork first and the BB crank second so you have them to work with while doing the rest. Then you can pretty much through the stuff on there and get it done.

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Old 04-12-14, 07:33 AM   #4
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I'm not sure that it matters much, except for the internal cables. Looks like fun!
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Old 04-12-14, 07:33 AM   #5
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#6 : Unless you are certain the internal cables have guide tubes in the frame, I'd run the internal cable housings before installing the bottom bracket, fork or seatpost. You may have to get your fingers into the downtube, toptube or headtube to guide the housing and you want access to these tube ends. Also,#2 and #3 , why install the front brake before you install the fork?
Good point about cable housings. They run inside the frame, not through the BB, but through the headtube. You are right they probably should be run as #1 , before the greasy headset installed. I probably need to run them with enough length on both sides, and trim them later.

I install the front brake on fork first, because it seems easier to do it on fork itself.
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Old 04-12-14, 07:38 AM   #6
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I'm not sure that it matters much, except for the internal cables. Looks like fun!
I am looking forward to start it is fun. BTW this is my first bike I am assembling myself, though I took apart and put back the bike I already have.

Internal cables are not that bad. I have a frame where cable housings themselves run inside the wide plastic tubes. I tried to slip one of them, and it works ok.

This is how it looks:
XK8V6974 by Genna B, on Flickr
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Old 04-12-14, 07:59 AM   #7
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I've only done one, but it was fun. I couldn't wait for an organized plan and put the pieces on as they came in within reason.
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Old 04-12-14, 08:24 AM   #8
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Old 04-12-14, 08:35 AM   #9
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Are you by any chance related to Honey Boo-Boo?
No, I have no idea who is it
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Old 04-12-14, 08:50 AM   #10
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What would you do differently and why
Id just do the work with the tools ( because I Can)

have you bothered to search any how to pages , or pick up a book?.

what is the barter work have you to trade tor the help?
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Old 04-12-14, 10:17 AM   #11
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No, I have no idea who is it
Google or You Tube it.
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Old 04-12-14, 11:42 AM   #12
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have you bothered to search any how to pages , or pick up a book?.
All instructions I was able to find on Youtube are about assembling bikes that come (for example from BD) partially assembled. This is not what I have. That is why I am trying to lay down the plan before I start.
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Old 04-12-14, 11:48 AM   #13
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Buy a book on bike repair , or visit the Public Library .. you have of course a lot of special bike tools to buy

perhaps you should avail yourself of a bike shop and speak to people in real time and present.

thousands of other posts here, before today , have you looked for any?


kids .. Internet induced helplessness

install the f'ing Fork & BB .

you want mom to tie you shoes for you too?

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Old 04-12-14, 05:08 PM   #14
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All instructions I was able to find on Youtube are about assembling bikes that come (for example from BD) partially assembled. This is not what I have. That is why I am trying to lay down the plan before I start.
Shimano, Campagnolo, and I assume SRAM, all have Tech Document" web sites with their component's instruction sheets, installation and adjustment directions and parts diagrams. Look up the appropriate ones if your parts don't include the proper documentation. Park Tools also has a huge range of tutorials on their web site.
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Old 04-12-14, 05:25 PM   #15
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Of course a sensible action plan cannot hurt, but for the most part putting together a bike is really just about hanging the parts on the frame in some sensible order. You won't go too far wrong whether you start at the back, the front or the middle. I just let the spirit move me as to what goes on next. I like your idea of putting on the stay protector early. The crank and rear wheel can get in the way of that.

I do put the brakes on the fork after installing the fork, however. And likewise the pedals go on after the crank is installed. Bars go on after the stem is installed. That is because having less weight on the stem helps you to feel the proper adjustment of the head set bearings. Rear brakes go on just about anytime but always before the rear wheel to give your wrench as must freedom to turn in the tight space as possible. You need the rear wheel on before you can size the chain. Can't think of much else.
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Old 04-12-14, 06:54 PM   #16
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Of course a sensible action plan cannot hurt, but for the most part putting together a bike is really just about hanging the parts on the frame in some sensible order. You won't go too far wrong whether you start at the back, the front or the middle. I just let the spirit move me as to what goes on next. I like your idea of putting on the stay protector early. The crank and rear wheel can get in the way of that.

I do put the brakes on the fork after installing the fork, however. And likewise the pedals go on after the crank is installed. Bars go on after the stem is installed. That is because having less weight on the stem helps you to feel the proper adjustment of the head set bearings. Rear brakes go on just about anytime but always before the rear wheel to give your wrench as must freedom to turn in the tight space as possible. You need the rear wheel on before you can size the chain. Can't think of much else.
It make sense, thank you. Yes I know, if I put something in wrong order I always can take it apart, but here is my revised plan:

1. Run cable housings (internal cables)


2. Protective film on chainstay drive side


3. Headset bearings


4. Fork/Stem/Front Brakes


5. Rear Brakes


6. Handle bar, shifters, brake levers (TT)


7. Route and trim cable housing on the handle bar
7a. Inline barrel adjuster on FD housing


8. Run the cables


9. Bottom bracket/Crankset


10. FD and chain catcher


11. RD


12. Wheels/Chain


13. Seatpost/Saddle


14. Pedals


15. Adjust headset, brakes, RD and FD


16. Ride
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Old 04-13-14, 06:46 PM   #17
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I did it!

This is before:


This is 4 hrs 37 min later:



I looked up the internet only once, because got mental block about what brake is front and what is rear. I left the housings intentionally longer than needed, will trim them after the retul fitting.

I did not do any fitting today, just estimated the seat height to be the same as on my road bike. Then I took a ride for about an hour, and it was fun, got average speed over 20 mph. Could be faster, but my seat bolt became loose, and I had to stop twice to tighten them with my fingers, because did not take any tools with me.

I want to thank you all for answering my questions

I liked it, will do it again any time I have an opportunity for a new bike.
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Old 04-13-14, 07:10 PM   #18
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Nice. I knew you could do it.
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Old 04-13-14, 09:51 PM   #19
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Of course a sensible action plan cannot hurt, but for the most part putting together a bike is really just about hanging the parts on the frame in some sensible order. You won't go too far wrong whether you start at the back, the front or the middle. I just let the spirit move me as to what goes on next. I like your idea of putting on the stay protector early. The crank and rear wheel can get in the way of that.
I just put the parts on in the order that UPS delivered them.
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Old 04-13-14, 09:59 PM   #20
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Great job!

Eat, drink and celebrate your accomplishments.
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Old 04-14-14, 05:37 AM   #21
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I just put the parts on in the order that UPS delivered them.
Maybe in my next life I have too many little hands at work around the house to leave all my valuable tools and parts laying around
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Old 04-14-14, 06:50 AM   #22
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Buy a book on bike repair , or visit the Public Library .. you have of course a lot of special bike tools to buy perhaps you should avail yourself of a bike shop and speak to people in real time and present. thousands of other posts here, before today , have you looked for any? kids .. Internet induced helplessness install the f'ing Fork & BB . you want mom to tie you shoes for you too?
Criticism and insults, posted under an assumed name, and sent from the safety of an anonymous keyboard.
Offhand, I can't think of any thing more non-productive, off-putting, or cowardly. See above for an example.
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Old 04-14-14, 06:59 AM   #23
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I always begin with the headset and bottom bracket bearings. Always, and the fork gets installed immediately after/with the headset. For unthreaded steerers, that means that the starnut, cap, and stem go on next.

Then I focus on the drivetrain. Crankset, re-check bb bearings, rear wheel and cogset, rear derailleur (set limit screws), and then fd (its limit screws). Then the chain (using the big-big method, my preference).

Then the shifters and cables for the drivetrain. This involves the handlebars usually, so they'll need to go before the shifters. (If using bar-end shifters (non-TT configuration), then brake levers must go on first). Cut the shifter cable housings for optimum length, not too much slop, and not binding. Then inner cables/ferrules and seating the cables, running the shifters through their paces. No crimp ends and leave the ends uncut until install is completed.

Wheels - on the stand or on the frame - stress relieving spokes, lubing nipples, retruing, checking the rim tape. Adjust hub bearings. So, now both front and back are ready to have brakeset installed.

Brake calipers and levers (if independent from shifters). Then the cable housings/ferrules, then inner cabling, securing housings against the handlebar. Add brake pads and align, adjusting toe-in. Re-check rims against pads. No crimp ends or cuts yet.

Tires and tubes - remove wheels and mount. Check headset, adjust.

Seatpost, seatpost clamp, saddle - adjust to [my, customer's] dimensions.

Bar tape, then wax frame lightly.

Test ride, adjust, trip and crimp cable ends. Re-true rims, adjust bottom bracket or headset, if needed.
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Old 04-14-14, 07:01 AM   #24
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Criticism and insults, posted under an assumed name, and sent from the safety of an anonymous keyboard.
Offhand, I can't think of any thing more non-productive, off-putting, or cowardly. See above for an example.
You have to get used to fietsbob.

1. He posts generally technically correct information phrased and formatted in ways that require several readings to decipher.
2. He is convinced (since he works in one) that everyone should always take their bikes to a bike shop and buy all of their parts from said shop.
3. Phil Wood is the second coming and their parts should be fitted to any and every bike no matter what the cost.
4. Anything beyond 7-speed and downtube or barend shifters is suspect. The sole exception is Rohloff's wildly expensive IGH.
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Old 04-14-14, 09:13 AM   #25
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Using a book from the library is a flame on the internet?
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