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Old 04-12-14, 02:46 PM   #1
xinlitik
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Maintenance Advice - Raleigh Technium Tri-Lite Pro

Hi all
I recently purchased a Raleigh Technium Tri-Lite pro (this one: http://backroom.hardsdisk.net/images/raltecbefore.jpg). I was wondering what kinds of maintenance I should perform on it prior to using it as a daily commuter. Would it be smart to do some of the deeper maintenance like greasing bearings in the bottom bracket and wheels? Otherwise I was just going to take it to a shop that has a $30 special for a tune up including truing which I don't think I could do well. Also, does anyone know what size bearings would be inside of the hubs/crank/headset so I can order the proper parts if need be?

Thanks

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Old 04-12-14, 03:49 PM   #2
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Greetings xinlitik,

My friend just acquired his first road bike and coincidentally, itís a 1997 Raleigh Tri Lite Technium! It has 52/40 chainrings and had a 6-speed 13-26 freewheel. It needed new 700 x 28 tires, so I surprised him with a new set and then mounted them for him. His Tri Lite is roughly 11 pounds lighter than his old Huffy hardtail, so heís been enjoying the easier acceleration and slightly higher ascent speeds on the milder hills. However, its lowest gearing doesnít compare to the superior mechanical advantage of his Huffyís upgraded 24-speed lowest gearing, so the Tri Lite is currently best suited on milder ascents and flatter terrain.

Incidentally, the manufacture date of your Tri Lite Technium can be derived from the serial number on the bottom bracket shell of the frame. My friendís was manufactured on January 26, 1997 and was the 29th bike manufactured that day.

My friend doesnít care for downtube shifters and neither does he care for drop bars (that makes two of us), so he asked me to convert it over to flat bars and throw on a 6-speed SRAM GripShifter so he could shift at any instant without having to let go of the handlebars. We ride around in a lot of heavy traffic and letting go of the handlebars to shift is less than an ideal circumstance. We also live and ride in very hilly terrain, so shifting is very nearly a constant task.

I upgraded his Tri Lite to 7-speed GripShifters, a 14-28 7-speed freewheel and an Acera X rear derailleur (parts I had around from one of my old mountain bikes). We couldnít use the existing suntour CX5000 rear derailleur as it isnít compatible with the pull of the 6 or 7-speed SRAM GripShifters. Once I put the old Acera X rear derailleur on, its shifting was almost perfect before I adjusted the barrel adjuster a couple ľ turns.

I have to head out now, but Iíll try to get back to this thread in another day or so.
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Old 04-12-14, 06:09 PM   #3
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Unless you know the bottom bracket, headset, and wheels have been greased, do this. Especially if you want a daily rider. The price of bearings is cheap enough that I replace them.
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Old 04-13-14, 11:15 AM   #4
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helpful information here as well as Park tool site also
FREE SITE - WORK SHOP
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Old 04-13-14, 09:03 PM   #5
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Thanks for the replies guys. That site is really useful, Park tools is great but I like this one's explanations a bit better. I'll get set for those jobs then. I was thinking about getting Amazon.com: 500 Piece Bicycle Loose Ball Bearing Assortment 1/8" to 1/4": Sports & Outdoors that set of bearings to just go ahead and replace all the bearings, is that a decent idea? I am also going to get the Park tools FR-1 as that seems to be the right one for the freewheel. My big questions are what special tool I need to service the bottom bracket, what size the caged bearings in the headset (not sure how to measure), and what would be a decent, budget shifter and brake cable replacement. Any suggestions? Much appreciated.

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Old 04-14-14, 09:20 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by xinlitik View Post
Thanks for the replies guys. That site is really useful, Park tools is great but I like this one's explanations a bit better. I'll get set for those jobs then. I was thinking about getting Amazon.com: 500 Piece Bicycle Loose Ball Bearing Assortment 1/8" to 1/4": Sports & Outdoors that set of bearings to just go ahead and replace all the bearings, is that a decent idea? I am also going to get the Park tools FR-1 as that seems to be the right one for the freewheel. My big questions are what special tool I need to service the bottom bracket, what size the caged bearings in the headset (not sure how to measure), and what would be a decent, budget shifter and brake cable replacement. Any suggestions? Much appreciated.
xinlitik,

My friend’s Tri Lite Technium required a Park Tools FR-2 freewheel remover which is a 2 pronged tool (it was a suntour 6-speed freewheel). It’s the only one I’ve ever encountered that required the 2 prong tool, as the majority of freewheels I’ve encountered have been Shimano or Sunrace.

You can derive the manufacture date from your Tri Lite’s serial in the following manner and I’ll use the following serial number as a sample, R003310123 A:

Firstly, there’s always at least 10 digits to the serial number on the bottom bracket shell of the frame though some will have eleven digits with the last digit ending with an ‘A’ or a ‘B’. The first digit will always be an ‘R’ for Raleigh. The A or B at the end signifies which manufacturing shift built the bike; A = the morning shift, B = the evening shift.

R003310123 A

The 1[SUP]st[/SUP] & 5[SUP]th[/SUP] numerical digits indicate the year hence, the 0 & 1 of the sample indicates a manufacture year of 2001.

R003310123 A

The 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] thru 4[SUP]th[/SUP] numerical digits represent how many days into the year the bike was manufactured hence, via the 033 it’s February 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] (as there are only 31 days in January which means it’s 2 days into February).

R003310123 A

The 6[SUP]th[/SUP] thru 9[SUP]th[/SUP] numerical digits represents the bike count on that day’s shift hence, it was the 123[SUP]rd[/SUP] bike built that shift.

Another example: R902280017

The bike above would have been manufactured on January 22, 1998 and was the 17[SUP]th[/SUP] bike manufactured by one of the unrevealed shifts (as no A or B suffix was provided).
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Old 04-14-14, 05:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xinlitik View Post
Thanks for the replies guys. That site is really useful, Park tools is great but I like this one's explanations a bit better. I'll get set for those jobs then. I was thinking about getting Amazon.com: 500 Piece Bicycle Loose Ball Bearing Assortment 1/8" to 1/4": Sports & Outdoors that set of bearings to just go ahead and replace all the bearings, is that a decent idea? I am also going to get the Park tools FR-1 as that seems to be the right one for the freewheel. My big questions are what special tool I need to service the bottom bracket, what size the caged bearings in the headset (not sure how to measure), and what would be a decent, budget shifter and brake cable replacement. Any suggestions? Much appreciated.
That's not a bad price. i replace all bearings when doing stuff as they are so cheap. I buy in bulk at my local bearing house although on line is certainly an option. places like this. Motion Industries - Locations

If you don't want to buy the freewheel tool most shops will remove it for $5 or so. No tool needed to put back on.

If you're going to work on bikes invest in a cheap digital caliper metric/english to measure bearings seat posts, stems etc from a harbor freight or similar. 6" Composite Digital Caliper

replace the caged bearings in the headset or BB with loose ones.

BB tools are kind of like freewheel tools - What tools depends on your particular BB. Post a picture of the NDS (non drive side) of the BB as this is where the adjustable cup is which will determine what tool you need to at least take it apart to regrease.

Cables are what you find deals on. Daily riders - minimum SS inners, lined outers. indexed shifting requires index shift outer.
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Old 04-15-14, 08:37 PM   #8
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Thanks guys! Per the serial number, my bike was born on Jan 10, 1988. I'm glad to hear that I can simply replace the caged bearings with loose bearings as that will make things a lot simpler. As for the tools, I actually found a coop that is $7 an hour and assures me they have everything I'll need (which I'll take notes on) and will even help me out. This is the BB though: http://velobase.com/ViewComponent.as...34a99&Enum=115 (so a standard 22 mm tool and a ring wrench right?)
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Old 04-15-14, 09:01 PM   #9
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You should inspect the cones if you repack the hubs. If they're starting to pit, they're probably only going to get worse.

The wheels might need a tension and true.

Make sure you get a seat that's a little wider than your sit bones.
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Old 04-16-14, 11:38 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by xinlitik View Post
Thanks guys! Per the serial number, my bike was born on Jan 10, 1988. I'm glad to hear that I can simply replace the caged bearings with loose bearings as that will make things a lot simpler. As for the tools, I actually found a coop that is $7 an hour and assures me they have everything I'll need (which I'll take notes on) and will even help me out. This is the BB though: VeloBase.com - Component: Shimano FC-1050, 105 (so a standard 22 mm tool and a ring wrench right?)
Ah, so your serial number begins with R80108. Just wondering; did your serial number have an A or B suffix? My friend’s didn’t have any suffix.

It’s nice knowing the manufacture date of the bikes you own, so I’m glad I could be of assistance in that area. So now you have one more birthday to celebrate every year via cake and ice cream!


I used an adjustable wrench and a large pair of channel locks to remove the bottom bracket bearings, but it does appear to require a 22mm wrench (or at least my friend's 1997 does). I cleaned & inspected the ball bearings, regreased them, and then properly tensioned them and the cranks were spinning like new!
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Old 04-16-14, 12:01 PM   #11
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Below is a picture of my friend’s 1997 Tri Lite Technium road bike prior to installing a flat bar, SRAM 7-speed GripShifters, a 7-speed 14-28 freewheel, and a Shimano Acera X rear derailleur. Notice that it’s a very large frame (he’s 6’ 2” tall whereas I’m a Hobbit at just 5’ 7”). I’ve ridden it to test its shifting, but I have to pedal out of the saddle due to his seat height, which is actually a 1/2” higher than in that picture…

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File Type: jpg Tri Lite Technium Road Bike close-up.jpg (101.4 KB, 16 views)
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Old 04-27-14, 10:51 PM   #12
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Big maintenance weekend coming up in 2 weeks, will let ya'll know how it turns out! That's a pretty bike gnosis thanks for sharing
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Old 05-12-14, 09:14 PM   #13
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Alright, so slowly making progress. I rebuilt the front wheel hub at a local bike coop. It was seriously in need of TLC; the axle had an odd line of rust on it, the bearings were shot, and the cone was somewhat pitted. I replaced the axle, bearings, and cone (cup was fine). Unfortunately I couldn't find identical cones to replace the old pair with, but they were pretty close to the original....is that a problem?

Moving forward, I was wondering if I should overhaul the freewheel, or just lube it? It's very noisy and I was hoping to reduce that but I keep hearing that it's a painful procedure to go through. I will definitely be rebuilding the rear hub, bottom bracket, and headset though! Then onto new tires, and sometime in the future, a rack and pannier to really make the commute easy.

Anyone have suggestions for a tire that blends affordability, durability, speed, and comfort? I was looking at Gatorskins, maybe in 28 mm (running 25s now)...I'm not sure if 32s would fit in my frame?
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