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Old 04-23-14, 03:32 AM   #1
TrailShredder
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What spoke lengths for rear M529 hub and 26" Rhyno Lite?

First time attempting to build a wheel. I'm getting cold feet and I'm starting to wish I had just ordered one of the bargain basement $60 wheels off eBay.

I already have in possession the Shimano m529 rear hub and the 26" Sun Rhyno Lite 32h is on the way. I've ran the numbers to get the spoke lengths but would feel more comfortable if someone with more experience could run them. Using 3-cross lacing. Do I round up or down if it has a decimal?

I plan on using Sapim Race double butted spokes and nipples.

ERD 548mm for Sun Rhyno Lite 26"

M529 Rear Hub Specs
Non-Drive Side Center To Flange: 33.5mm
Drive Side Center To Flange: 19.5mm
Drive Side Flange Diameter: 61.0mm
Non-Drive Side Flange Diameter: 61.0mm

Thanks!

I've read through some wheel building sites and have watched a few video tutorials but could still use some tips and tricks.
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Old 04-23-14, 04:07 AM   #2
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You have to measure your wheels, use a calculator and figure out the numbers. Letting someone else tell you spoke lengths could end up with incorrect sizes... Its not hard to do, and there is plenty of info out there. I use spocalc and it works just fine.

I usually round down since spokes will stretch a little, but since spokes ususally come in even # lengths, I round up when it makes sense (like 285.3 would get a 286 spoke most likely).

Just my $0.02
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Old 04-23-14, 04:08 AM   #3
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Would be looking at a spoke caculator like Edd, an easy to use spoke calculator or Spocalc, by Damon Rinard. A free Excel spoke length calculator.

For a first wheel, would be looking at doing a front, as you don;t need to worry about the dishing in the same way as a rear
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Old 04-23-14, 08:30 AM   #4
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I agree with everyone else that you should use a spoke calculator. Spocalc is good for old rims and hubs but it's a bit dated...the database is from around 2008. You can enter your own data in Spocalc and develop your own data base which is nice but it can be a bit tedious. I've also found that Spocalc tends to give longer spoke lengths than I would like.

Prowheelbuilder is a better calculator for newer components. It's a little more user friendly. The Shimano M529 isn't specifically listed but I've found that Shimano doesn't vary their hub sizes from year to year. The M530 that is listed will give you the same dimensions.
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Old 04-23-14, 08:35 AM   #5
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Since you have a double wall rim, if you get a bit too long of a spoke, you don't have to worry about a spoke end popping a tube.
I'd get 264 & 265.

You didn't specify spoke hole diameter, but that would only make a 0.1mm difference.
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Old 04-23-14, 06:04 PM   #6
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Old 04-23-14, 06:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I agree with everyone else that you should use a spoke calculator. Spocalc is good for old rims and hubs but it's a bit dated...the database is from around 2008. You can enter your own data in Spocalc and develop your own data base which is nice but it can be a bit tedious. I've also found that Spocalc tends to give longer spoke lengths than I would like.

Prowheelbuilder is a better calculator for newer components. It's a little more user friendly. The Shimano M529 isn't specifically listed but I've found that Shimano doesn't vary their hub sizes from year to year. The M530 that is listed will give you the same dimensions.
I checked the spoke lengths for a variety of Shimano mtb hubs and they are ALL the same. I replaced an LX M550 with an LX T670 and used the same spokes with no problem. The M550 is from 1990 and the T670 is a 2013 model.
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Old 04-23-14, 08:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
Since you have a double wall rim, if you get a bit too long of a spoke, you don't have to worry about a spoke end popping a tube.
But you do have to worry about running out of threads.

It's physically impossible for DT spokes with 9.5mm of threads to reach more than 1.5mm beyond the top of a 12mm DT nipple which has 8mm of threads. Other brands are similar.

Just measure. Take two spokes of known length, insert in opposite holes, thread the nipples on to your target depth (generally the slot), measure across the elbows with calipers, and add to twice the spoke length. Repeat at several points (rims are often slightly egg-shaped) and average.

Equipment changes, extruder dies wear, sometimes there are design changes.

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Old 04-23-14, 11:02 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the replies!

I did use a calculator, I was just hoping someone could also run the numbers (maybe in another calc) and verify.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Prowheelbuilder is a better calculator for newer components. It's a little more user friendly. The Shimano M529 isn't specifically listed but I've found that Shimano doesn't vary their hub sizes from year to year. The M530 that is listed will give you the same dimensions.
Yep, that's the calculator I used. The M529 is listed and these are the numbers it came up with:

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Old 04-23-14, 11:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
Since you have a double wall rim, if you get a bit too long of a spoke, you don't have to worry about a spoke end popping a tube.
I'd get 264 & 265.
Can i ask what calculator you used Bill? Pro wheel came up with 266 and 264.6.
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Old 04-23-14, 11:34 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrailShredder View Post
Can i ask what calculator you used Bill? Pro wheel came up with 266 and 264.6.
Spocalc and confirmed with mrrabit's [TABLE]


[TR]
[TD="width: 285"]SPOKE CHART VERSION 2.0[/TD]

[/TR]


[/TABLE]
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Old 04-24-14, 08:29 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrailShredder View Post
Thanks for all the replies!

I did use a calculator, I was just hoping someone could also run the numbers (maybe in another calc) and verify.

I see it now. They could have listed it the way they list the other hubs to avoid confusion but...

Yep, that's the calculator I used. The M529 is listed and these are the numbers it came up with:
I see it now. They could have listed it differently to avoid confusion.

From personal experience, I've never found Spocalc to be that accurate. Their values are always a little off. Actually, the values are usually a little long so that the end of the spoke protrudes from the nipple more than I like.
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Old 04-24-14, 01:03 PM   #13
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i built a 36 spoke wheel with an alfine hub and a rhino lite rim last year
and the only problem i ran into was that there are apparently several rhino lite styles that have been made
and they have slightly different erds listed in the database for the spoke calculator i used

i measured my rim
and it was a couple mm off from all the listed measurements
then i calculated and ordered the spokes
and at full tension the tops of the spokes are as close as i have ever seen to perfectly flush with the top of the nipples

the moral of my story is
measure to be sure
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Old 04-24-14, 01:30 PM   #14
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In my experience I've found Spocalc to be excellent.
I round up slightly (up to about .6-7mm) and typically have the spoke end between the screwdriver flat & top of the nipple.
I'd rather be there then below the screwdriver flat to any degree.
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