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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 07-20-14, 12:34 AM   #1
Furcifer
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Hello, thanks, and what do you think?

Hello, all. This is my first post here. Ive been on bicycles almost all of my 26 years, though I had never rode a "road bike".

I was getting curious about them, and I picked up the first one I found, a huge 1982 Schwinn traveler. Im only 5'10", but I really, really enjoyed riding this bike.

A friend liked it, and asked if I would fix up a piece of rust he had in the shed. I go to pick it up, and find it to be a 70's Azuki.

My first thoughts were that it was too bad off, and would not be salvageable. Research showed that it wasnt worth saving anyhow, but, I gave it a wirl. I thought it would at least be a great learning experience.

I may have been able to do it without google, but it would have taken much longer. Google lead me straight here most times, and I learned alot through searching the forum, a big thanks to everyone for sharing your knowledge.

Now that Ive had a chance to ride an appropriate sized bike of this variety, Ive decided to get rid of the Schwinn, and find a new project that will fit me. The Azuki was a dream to ride when complete! I didnt feel as if I were over the wheels, but snug between them!

I cant wait to start the next project, but in the mean time, I wanted to share my work with others that might actually care/be interested.

Its far from a perfect restore. There was a ton of rust on everything, and I fear the components will start to rust more again very soon. The frame I feel I did a solid job on, removing all rust, and powder-coating it. The deraillers have been hard to dial in, and the rear one was bent, and needed straightening out. I also fear the rear cassette has internal damage. I was able to remove it, but not open it up. None of the three lbs here could either. It operates smoothly most of the time, but on occasion while power is being applied amply to it, it seems to "glitch", for lack of a better word. (Does this sound repairable?)

Overall Im happy with it, and hope you all will share your thoughts.

First pic is a before pic, right when I brought it home, then a size comparison with my Schwinn whilst still being assembled, and then the finished bicycle.

-SS
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Old 07-20-14, 12:48 AM   #2
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Cassettes doesn't have internals. Freewheels and freehub bodies have. Freewheels are almost never opened for service. They're either replaced(they're cheap enough for that) or possibly flushed and relubed.
Your issue sounds like sticky pawls. Freehub bodies can be opened. It's a bit unusual, but a shopshould know how.
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Old 07-20-14, 01:20 AM   #3
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Excuse my temporary ignorance in terminology. The part Im dealing with has the set of cogs attached to a "bearing" that moves in one direction only. This "bearing" has two small divots in it, that appear to be for a special tool to fit in, for removal. All of my attempts to compensate/create/outsource this supposed tool have failed. It definitely threads into the set of cogs though. If it has not been removed since the 1970's though, I could imagine it taking some force to remove, and with such small contact points for a tool, it could be impossible.
To clarify, it skips a bit in the driving direction, resulting in a temporary loss of drive, for maybe two chain links length, then catches again, Resulting in a sketchy ride. Especially when trying to get up to speed ;/ It also only happens when in the smaller three cogs. Not sure if they are referred to as higher, or lower.

Thank you for your response dabac.
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Old 07-20-14, 03:52 AM   #4
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Well, that's a freewheel. As stated, usually not serviced in depth. Do a search for "flush freewheel" or "lubricating a freewheel" and I'm sure you get plenty of helpful tips. Or simply have the whole unit removed, sprockets and all, and replace it with a new one. Might need to replace the chain too, as sprockets and chains wear together. Chainrings/crankset will usually be OK.
Powdercoat looks nice.

Oops, just noticed your bit about " only the smallest cogs".
THAT'S another thing entirely.
Two common options:
1)as the chain elongates with wear, it'll be a poorer and poorer fit to the sprockets. And the fewer teeth engaged, the bigger the risk for skipping. Hence happening more/first on the smaller sprockets.
2) some people do the bulk of their riding only on some of the sprockets, causing the chain and the favourite sprockets to wear together. Then when you shift out of the butter zone you get skipping on the less worn sprockets. Or if you put a new chain on a bike with unevenly worn sprockets it'll run fine on the least worn sprockets and skip on the most worn sprockets.

The rule is: whenever replacing a chain or a freewheel/cassette, be prepared to also have to replace the other.

Either way, the surefire cure is to replace both freewheel and chain, and hope for a little luck to let you keep tour chainrings/crankset.
Any bike you're willing to Powdercoat deserves a new chain/freewheel.
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Old 07-20-14, 01:13 PM   #5
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Ok, that does clarify a few things.

I did replace the chain, as the old one had cracked in half, and turned itself into a rust sculpture.

I worried that there would be an uneven wear issue, however the teeth of all the cogs looked practically new. The chain fit very nicely into all the cogs, I checked them all.

I will look into the flush/lube options thanks. I will also tell the guy I built it for that he should likely just replace it.
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Old 07-20-14, 01:43 PM   #6
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The pin tool for your freewheel can be found here . anhttp://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi?id=727198118541&d=single&c=Tools&sc=Cassette-and-Freewheel&tc=Spanners&item_id=PA-SPA2 and if you want to service it yourself here how .
Traditional Thread-on Freewheels
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Old 07-20-14, 03:21 PM   #7
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Build-a-long freewheel!!!! Photo heavy If you want to do it fine, here is some help.
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Old 07-20-14, 04:44 PM   #8
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Build-a-long freewheel!!!! Photo heavy If you want to do it fine, here is some help.
dedhed , You did a great job with that post . Great photos and explaining how to do it . I had done lot of freewheels in my day and I do them the same way as you had done here .
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Old 07-20-14, 05:14 PM   #9
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Thanks a million dedhed, if I would have just had the balls to take a punch to it
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Old 07-20-14, 05:32 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by bikeman715 View Post
dedhed , You did a great job with that post . Great photos and explaining how to do it . I had done lot of freewheels in my day and I do them the same way as you had done here .
Not my post just my link - from Capecodder on C& V. Also check out Pastor Bob from C & V if you'd rather not do it yourself.
FreeWheelSpa; The Home of Happy Bicycle Freewheels (and so much more)! - Freewheel repair, service and restoration
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Old 07-20-14, 05:45 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Not my post just my link - from Capecodder on C& V. Also check out Pastor Bob from C & V if you'd rather not do it yourself.
FreeWheelSpa; The Home of Happy Bicycle Freewheels (and so much more)! - Freewheel repair, service and restoration
Yes I had read Pastor Bob site before . He very good at it .
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Old 08-22-14, 11:50 AM   #12
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Hey guys! I recently was able to get the bike back from the owner, to take a look at what may be happening with the chain skipping.

I put the bike on the trainer, and had the gf pedal it to see what was happening.

My opinion, is that the two smallest cogs on the rear are worn, and causing the chain to slip.

So, Ive decided that the whole "freewheel" needs to be replaced. Id love you guys opinion on what I should replace it with, and where to get it. Id also like to hear opinions on if Im correct in my deducing what the actual issue is, if anyone has one.

The other gears all drive fine, it only happens in the smallest two, and under a "heavier" load. A light pedaling will not result in any slipping. Under a heavier load, one can see the chain sort of bunch up, and let a small amount of slack sort of slip at once, causing the slipping feeling.
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Old 08-22-14, 12:06 PM   #13
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Replace it with a similar size freewheel - get it from whatever source is cheapest or fastest, depending on what you value. Don't go to a bigger largest cog unless the chain is long enough. Dabac already fully explained the wear problem and "deduced" it for you.

Last edited by cny-bikeman; 08-22-14 at 12:23 PM.
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