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  1. #1
    Newbie dusnek's Avatar
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    Crank Quality: What makes some cranks so much nicer than others?

    Hello all,
    I'm currently building a fixed gear bike out of "Centurion Ironman Expert Dave Scott ed" frame that I found at my local bike shop. I bought a cheap single speed square taper crank (Sugino Pista) on Amazon, and was wondering if this is a bad idea. What sets apart the quality of different cranks, and what are the realistic implications of these differences upon my soon to be track bike? Should I be worried about the quality of my crank?
    Thanks for the insight!!
    Link to crank on Amazon: Amazon.com : Sugino Track Fixie Road Bike Crankset Pista 44T 165mm BLUE : Bike Cranksets And Accessories : Sports & Outdoors

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    The Sugino Pista crank is a quality crank as it is, so I wonder what the issue may be. The main features that make cranks "better" are more stiffness and lower weight. Of course, long term reliability is also important, but just about all cranks except some of the lightest or cheapest are fine in this respect.
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  3. #3
    Mechanic/Tourist
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    Use it.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    The "better" cranks are often finished more nicely.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  5. #5
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    It should take a while..

    some collectors and even while they were raced on ... had Premium priced Campag stiff forged hard tempered cranks fail .

    while JRA Riders on Low end Cast cranks were still in service and are Now.


    I dont think you will have warrantee support Buying Via Amazon Like doing business face to face in A Bike Shop.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 11-03-14 at 12:24 PM.

  6. #6
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Cheap cranks use "melt forged" (aka "cast") arms and have the spider and possibly the chainring swaged onto the arm. Slightly better quality cranks cast the arm and spider as a single unit. High quality cranks have the arm and spider forged as a single unit. Beyond this, finish will reflect the final quality/price.

  7. #7
    Andrew R Stewart Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
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    Ad budget, sponsorships, finish grade (mentioned already), what your buddies say... Andy.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kopsis's Avatar
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    Eccentricity and runout are sometimes better controlled in the high end cranksets. The effects of both on drivetrain power loss are very small, but I've seen people obsess about less.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bustaknot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    Cheap cranks use "melt forged" (aka "cast") arms and have the spider and possibly the chainring swaged onto the arm. Slightly better quality cranks cast the arm and spider as a single unit. High quality cranks have the arm and spider forged as a single unit. Beyond this, finish will reflect the final quality/price.
    Can you post some images of the differences between these please? Or list some brand names of cheap/better quality/high quality so I can have a google.

  10. #10
    Senior Member due ruote's Avatar
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    Here's a more expensive Sugino. If you can't see the difference, don't worry about it. I'm sure yours will work just fine.

  11. #11
    Rogue Cyclist RaleighSport's Avatar
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    Ancient picture but here's a Sugino Messenger on one of my bikes, it has faithfully served me for over a year. To outline what is "cheap" about it, the hidden mounting bolt is PITA,old fashioned square taper, and it is slightly heavier than it's Sugino counterparts in the higher end and that's about it. It's a stiff reliable crank that's never given me any issues, and it looks pretty nice too.

    "Seriously is what I want to be, so I put on spandex and show off my gear, my junk, my thing, yes my ding-a-ling."

  12. #12
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    Example of cold forged one piece crank arms. This started as a chunk of billet Al and was smashed by a very large ram using a die into its initial crankarm shape. After that, there would be machining and finishing steps prior to polishing and anodizing.



  13. #13
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Cold forging is using a number of different Dies, than one, till reaching nearly the finished shape .

    Using a different Alloy, Cranks made using CNC manufacturing techniques is also Done, Now.

    also quite nice..

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