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  1. #1
    Banned. Prozakk's Avatar
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    Titanium's Purpose?

    Are titanium parts for weight reduction only?

    I noticed titanium axles aren't for street use (not strong enough).

    What about other parts such as: spindles, cranks, crank bolts, axle nuts, stem nuts/bolts, pegs, etc.???

  2. #2
    Long haired freak. wethepeople's Avatar
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    Just for weight savings.

    Nuts and bolts should be fine, along with pegs.

    "the bus came by and I got on, that's when it all began...there was Cowboy Neal at the wheel of a bus to never-ever land."


  3. #3
    I rule with a mighty leg FitRider 921's Avatar
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    Titanium pegs don't slide as well and are known to actually slow down the surface you are grinding.
    I am Gunz. Gunz are me.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    The purpose of titanium is to inflate bike manufacturer profits.

    See also: The Purpose of Aluminum. The Purpose of Carbon.

  5. #5
    dillyshotback
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    Titanium is stiffer than aluminum, so it is possible to run it as an axle or bolt which you cant with aluminum and it's considerably lighter than steel. However, because of it's properties it snaps instead of bending.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Titanium has very limited use in BMX. It's good for lightweight road bikes though. The single best application for MTBs is the pivot bolt for the rear derailleur. Your frame or hanger will give up the ghost long before a standard steel bolt. A $5 ti bolt snaps, saving your frame. Of course, SRP sells an aluminum one too.

  7. #7
    l33t lunchbox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprintcarblue
    Titanium is stiffer than aluminum, so it is possible to run it as an axle or bolt which you cant with aluminum and it's considerably lighter than steel. However, because of it's properties it snaps instead of bending.
    Correct sir.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprintcarblue
    Titanium is stiffer than aluminum, so it is possible to run it as an axle or bolt which you cant with aluminum and it's considerably lighter than steel. However, because of it's properties it snaps instead of bending.
    But it will bend or flex more than steel or aluminum before breaking. It has a much greater resistance to fatigue.

  9. #9
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    it's has one advantage in bmx, but its disadvantages are numerous.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
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    Cheaper, stronger, lighter, pick two, never all three. Titanium is an expensive way to save weight.
    This space open

  11. #11
    I rule with a mighty leg FitRider 921's Avatar
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    Titanium isn't stronger.
    I am Gunz. Gunz are me.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunzOfSteel 921
    Titanium isn't stronger.
    Neither is steel. Or aluminum for that matter. Stronger than what?

  13. #13
    Senior Member eightdip's Avatar
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    diamond haha
    Dip me in chocolate and feed me to the Lesbians, eight times because thats my name.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eightdip
    diamond haha
    Diamonds are rated on the Rockwell hardness scale. Tubing that was as hard as a diamond would probably shatter.

  15. #15
    Neat - w/ ice on the side dalmore's Avatar
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    Titanium is between steel and alumium in almost every physical category that matters in bike making. It's heavier than alu, lighter than steel. stronger both in flexing then returning to shape and in permanently bending/breaking than alu but weaker than steel in in both aspects.

    For our bike building purposes I'm not sure it matters, but there is nothing particular about Titanium that I've ever read that suggests it's more prone to snap instead of bend. Again that's kind of moot because TI parts will generally be the weakest link in a bike system so thus fail first in most bike applications. But even steel will snap with the right application of force.

    Aluminum is prone to snapping after a point. It develops fatigue and gets more brittle with each time it's bent. As a result, bike frames made from aluminum are "overbuilt" to the point of being both heavier and stronger than Titanium frames. This is why Titanium has it's place in lightweight bike building and why it has a reputation in some circles as being flexy.

    Titanium also is highly corrosion resistant - not so important in BMX bikes for any reason that I can think of.
    Last edited by dalmore; 08-07-06 at 07:52 AM.
    Current favorite bumper sticker: Wag more. Bark less.

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  16. #16
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmore
    Titanium is between steel and alumium in almost every physical category that matters in bike making. It's heavier than alu, lighter than steel. stronger both in flexing then returning to shape and in permanently bending/breaking than alu but weaker than steel in in both aspects.

    For our bike building purposes I'm not sure it matters, but there is nothing particular about Titanium that I've ever read that suggests it's more prone to snap instead of bend. Again that's kind of moot because TI parts will generally be the weakest link in a bike system so thus fail first in most bike applications. But even steel will snap with the right application of force.

    Aluminum is prone to snapping after a point. It develops fatigue and gets more brittle with each time it's bent. As a result, bike frames made from aluminum are "overbuilt" to the point of being both heavier and stronger than Titanium frames. This is why Titanium has it's place in lightweight bike building and why it has a reputation in some circles as being flexy.

    Titanium also is highly corrosion resistant - not so important in BMX bikes for any reason that I can think of.
    Failure is more dependent on application than materials.

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