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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    im sorry to tell all of you who seem not to know anything about metal but Hi tensile steel is a good steel and nearly bulletproof meaning if you get hit buy a car or crash it will hold up and wont loose its strength even if bent so i would recommend it for off road and on road use.

    on the other hand
    Chrome Molybdneum steel is more rigid which means it is less likely to bend but more likely to snap it is not stronger in most meanings of the word related to metal.

    Flexibility is essential in metal this is proven in what they use to build sky scrappers which if you did not know sway slightly in the wind a rigid metal would snap.

    Chromoly is only good on ramps

    High tensile steel is steel that has more than twice the tensile strength of mild steel and ten times that of wood. Such steel is widely used in motorway safety fences, offshore mooring cables and pre-stressed concrete and bridge ropes. The stoutness of metals is normally reduced by increasing their tensile strengths.

    High tensile steel put simply is used where structures require high tensile strength. Tensile stress is where the forces on a material are "pulling" from each end away from
    Ultimate tensile strength (UTS), often shortened to tensile strength (TS) or ultimate strength, is the maximum stress that a material can withstand while being stretched or pulled before failing or breaking. Tensile strength is not the same as compressive strength and the values can be quite different.
    Some materials will break sharply, without plastic deformation, in what is called a brittle failure. Others, which are more ductile, including most metals, will experience some plastic deformation and possiblynecking before fracture
    (Quote Wiki) : Ultimate tensile strength - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You're confusing the technical term, high tensile steel, with the "hi-tensile" term, casually used in the bicycle industry.

    Many types of steels are referred to as having the property of high tensile strength. 4130 chromoly steel is just one of such steels. "Hi-tensile" 1020 steel used in the bicycle industry does not have high tensile strength like chromoly steel and other related proprietary steels used for bicycle frames. In fact, it has comparatively low tensile strength. It also has low yield strength. The weight of all steels is relatively the same, due to the much higher iron content, than any other element contained in steel. This fact makes the mass of all steels relatively equivalent. However, it's the addition of other minor elements which contribute to the properties of other types of steels, that make them different from one another. For example, when we add, 1%Cr, .2%Mo, .2%Si, .04%S, .04%Mn, and .3% carbon, together with a remainder of Iron, we get a very strong type of steel, called chromoly steel. Once the carbon content exceeds 2.1%, we then are no longer able to refer to it as, "steel". It then becomes, "cast iron". You know, that material of which gas pipes, stove pipes, black pots and pans are made. That "hi-tensile" steel the bicycle industry casually refers to, is really closer to cast iron, than it is to chromoly steel, primarily due to its high carbon content.

    There's really no comparison of chromoly steel to hi-tensile steel. Just like there's really no comparison to steel that has high tensile strength, to "hi-tensile" steel. Hi-tensile steel bicycle tubes are rarely butted, due to the fact that extra material is needed to maintain their strength. Chromoly steel tubes can be butted, because chromoly steel is strong and extra material can be shaved off in order to make the bicycle lighter for the purpose of attaining greater speed and increase handling responsiveness.

    http://racetechsteel.com.au/technical
    Last edited by WestPablo; 05-15-14 at 08:33 AM.

  2. #77
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    you have just proven my point so ill make it simple for everyone

    when
    chromoly reaches its max weight it snaps.

    when
    hi-tensile steel reaches its max weight it stretches or bends slightly then when the weight is removed it returns to its form.

    and both can take the same weight that is why the
    hi-tensile steel frame is thicker.

    and gas pipes are made of copper !
    Last edited by Blacksmith101; 05-15-14 at 10:04 AM. Reason: forgot to add somthing

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    you have just proven my point so ill make it simple for everyone

    when
    chromoly reaches its max weight it snaps.

    when
    hi-tensile steel reaches its max weight it stretches or bends slightly then when the weight is removed it returns to its form.

    and both can take the same weight that is why the
    hi-tensile steel frame is thicker.

    and gas pipes are made of copper !
    There's no such thing in science called, "maximum weight" with respect to chromoly steel, or "hi-tensile" steel for that matter. The weight of the object made of steel (regardless as to the type), is just simply the mass (m) multiplied by the acceleration of gravity (g). W=mg

    * Some gas pipes are made of Cu and some are made of something very close to cast iron, but loosely referred to as..."steel". Most households have "steel" pipes.

    What do you mean, "they both can take the same weight"?

    Are you referring to a force applied to the different steels?...If so, then you're wrong.

    The hi-tensile steel needs to be made thicker, if it's going to approach the strength of chromoly steel.
    Last edited by WestPablo; 05-15-14 at 11:44 AM.

  4. #79
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    First lets talk about water piping:

    Copper Pipe

    This type of pipe is mostly used for hot and cold water distribution as well as being regularly used in HVAC systems for refrigerant lines. Copper piping works in both underground and aboveground applications, but copper can be affected by some soils and should be sleeved if used underground. Due to the price of copper and longer labor needed to install many builders are switching to alternative water distributions piping like PEX. Copper comes in different thicknesses which are labeled M, L, and K. M is the thinnest grade of copper. Copper is connected by soldering pipe into the fittings.

    PEX

    PEX stands for Cross-linked polyethylene or XLPEl but, PEX is much easier to remember and say. PEX is commonly used for hot and cold water in homes and as hydronic heating due to its resistance to hot and cold temperatures. PEX is widely used now for its competitive pricing, ease of use, and the long rolls of piping that it can come in. PEX is jointed in many different ways including push fit fittings and specialty PEX tools used with crimp rings to secure the joints.

    PVC

    PVC stand for PolyVinyl Chloride. This type of pipe has a wide variety of plumbing uses from drainage pipe to water mains. It is most commonly used for irrigation piping, home, and building supply piping. PVC is also very common in pool and spa systems. PVC is often white but it can also come in a wide variety of colors. You can often tell what it is used for by the colors and marking on the pipe. For example purple pipe with black lettering is used for reclaimed water. PVC also comes in a variety of thicknesses called schedules. Schedules 40 being the most common for water distribution.PVC pipe should always be clearly labeled if it is used for both potable (drinkable) and non potable water in the same building. PVC joins are made by using a primer that softens the PVC and then applying PVC glue that melts the joints and pipe together.

    CPVC

    CPVC stands for Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride. This type of pipe can stand temperatures up to about 180 degrees (this depends on the schedule) or so and can be used for hot and cold water inside of a house or mobile home. CPVC is the same outside diameter as copper and PEX so push fit fittings that fit PEX and copper, such as SharkBite, will fit the CPVC pipping. Like with PVC you should use primer and a glue when making a CPVC joint. Also, make sure the glue you are using says that is can be used on CPVC. This glue is usually a different color like orange so you know that it is used for CPVC.


    Now lets talk about gas piping:

    Copper tube is what is normally used.

    PVC Pipes

    PVC - Polyvinyl Chloride - pipes may be used in pipelines buried outside a building.
    PE Pipes

    PE - Polyethylene - pipes may be used in pipelines buried outside a building.
    Flexible Connectors

    Flexible connectors are used to connect appliances to gas sources. Flexible connectors must be approved.
    Copper Pipes

    Copper pipes used in gas systems should be of type L or K and approved for gas.
    Yellow Brass Pipes

    Yellow brass pipes may be approved for inside installations.
    Aluminum Pipes

    Aluminum pipes should not be used in the ground. Aluminum is not approved in all jurisdictions.

    now lets talk about Mass and Weight :

    Well, mass is a measurement of how much matter is in an object; weight is a measurement of how hard gravity is pulling on that object.
    Your mass is the same wherever you are--on Earth, on the moon, floating in space--because the amount of stuff you're made of doesn't change.
    But your weight depends on how much gravity is acting on you at the moment.
    And when i say "maximum weight" i mean the maximum weight that the object can support before breaking, not the mass of the object.

    there is a max weight in everything!

    Mass versus weight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Weight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    What is WEIGHT? definition of WEIGHT (Science Dictionary)
    http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~pettie/ma...al-version.pdf






  5. #80
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    can someone please tell me how to get the font and size stuff to work

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    First lets talk about water piping:

    Copper Pipe

    This type of pipe is mostly used for hot and cold water distribution as well as being regularly used in HVAC systems for refrigerant lines. Copper piping works in both underground and aboveground applications, but copper can be affected by some soils and should be sleeved if used underground. Due to the price of copper and longer labor needed to install many builders are switching to alternative water distributions piping like PEX. Copper comes in different thicknesses which are labeled M, L, and K. M is the thinnest grade of copper. Copper is connected by soldering pipe into the fittings.

    PEX

    PEX stands for Cross-linked polyethylene or XLPEl but, PEX is much easier to remember and say. PEX is commonly used for hot and cold water in homes and as hydronic heating due to its resistance to hot and cold temperatures. PEX is widely used now for its competitive pricing, ease of use, and the long rolls of piping that it can come in. PEX is jointed in many different ways including push fit fittings and specialty PEX tools used with crimp rings to secure the joints.

    PVC

    PVC stand for PolyVinyl Chloride. This type of pipe has a wide variety of plumbing uses from drainage pipe to water mains. It is most commonly used for irrigation piping, home, and building supply piping. PVC is also very common in pool and spa systems. PVC is often white but it can also come in a wide variety of colors. You can often tell what it is used for by the colors and marking on the pipe. For example purple pipe with black lettering is used for reclaimed water. PVC also comes in a variety of thicknesses called schedules. Schedules 40 being the most common for water distribution.PVC pipe should always be clearly labeled if it is used for both potable (drinkable) and non potable water in the same building. PVC joins are made by using a primer that softens the PVC and then applying PVC glue that melts the joints and pipe together.

    CPVC

    CPVC stands for Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride. This type of pipe can stand temperatures up to about 180 degrees (this depends on the schedule) or so and can be used for hot and cold water inside of a house or mobile home. CPVC is the same outside diameter as copper and PEX so push fit fittings that fit PEX and copper, such as SharkBite, will fit the CPVC pipping. Like with PVC you should use primer and a glue when making a CPVC joint. Also, make sure the glue you are using says that is can be used on CPVC. This glue is usually a different color like orange so you know that it is used for CPVC.


    Now lets talk about gas piping:

    Copper tube is what is normally used.

    PVC Pipes

    PVC - Polyvinyl Chloride - pipes may be used in pipelines buried outside a building.
    PE Pipes

    PE - Polyethylene - pipes may be used in pipelines buried outside a building.
    Flexible Connectors

    Flexible connectors are used to connect appliances to gas sources. Flexible connectors must be approved.
    Copper Pipes

    Copper pipes used in gas systems should be of type L or K and approved for gas.
    Yellow Brass Pipes

    Yellow brass pipes may be approved for inside installations.
    Aluminum Pipes

    Aluminum pipes should not be used in the ground. Aluminum is not approved in all jurisdictions.

    now lets talk about Mass and Weight :

    Well, mass is a measurement of how much matter is in an object; weight is a measurement of how hard gravity is pulling on that object.
    Your mass is the same wherever you are--on Earth, on the moon, floating in space--because the amount of stuff you're made of doesn't change.
    But your weight depends on how much gravity is acting on you at the moment.
    And when i say "maximum weight" i mean the maximum weight that the object can support before breaking, not the mass of the object.

    there is a max weight in everything!

    Mass versus weight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Weight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    What is WEIGHT? definition of WEIGHT (Science Dictionary)
    http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~pettie/ma...al-version.pdf


    All of these definitions are impertinent to our discussion. The fact remains that "hi-tensile" or carbon steel, lies somewhere between actual high tensile steel, such as, chromoly steel and cast iron. The same type of cast iron that flows gas through your furnace in the basement, and leads to your stove. It's called, "Black Iron".

    http://homerepair.about.com/od/plumb...terials_10.htm
    Last edited by WestPablo; 05-15-14 at 01:22 PM.

  7. #82
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    so what you are trying to say is hi-tensile steel is actually low-tensile steel?

  8. #83
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    its in the name lol

  9. #84
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    btw cast iron is weak thats the same **** they used in the old steering it keeps breaking lol

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    so what you are trying to say is hi-tensile steel is actually low-tensile steel?
    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    its in the name lol
    Yup! That's all it is....It's all in the stupid name..."Hi-tensile" steel in the bicycle industry is really just a low tensile type of steel. That's it!

  11. #86
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    hey dude thnx for making me and my associates laugh, we will sign up again to have some more fun soon once we finish the lab work, that if you post something interesting

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
    hey dude thnx for making me and my associates laugh, we will sign up again to have some more fun soon once we finish the lab work, that if you post something interesting
    I'll be looking forward to it, my friend!

  13. #88
    Senior Member longbeachgary's Avatar
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    I love when we fight over something that was posted 5 years ago....

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by longbeachgary View Post
    I love when we fight over something that was posted 5 years ago....
    It's almost like being married!
    Last edited by WestPablo; 05-15-14 at 04:32 PM.

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