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Thread: Installing pegs

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    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
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    Installing pegs

    Most of the BMX bikes I build come with either threaded or unthreaded pegs. Should I always install the peg, then the axle nut for both threaded and unthreaded, or can I install the axle nut, then peg for the threaded pegs?
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    Senior Member michaelscycles's Avatar
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    With the threaded ones, install the nut first, then the peg. You can take them off and on easier, but they are not as strong and if they come loose at all, they will bend the axle. Bolt on are much better.

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    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelscycles View Post
    With the threaded ones, install the nut first, then the peg. You can take them off and on easier, but they are not as strong and if they come loose at all, they will bend the axle. Bolt on are much better.
    Thanks for the info. I have a hard time installing threadless pegs on many bikes. The large contact surface between the peg and dropout seems to induce axle creep, throwing off the alignment and screwing up the chain tension. I've tried applying grease to the dropout/peg surfaces, and slowly tightening the axle bolts, alternating them, and I can get it, but it takes many trials. Sometimes I use the long, padded handle of a Park pedal wrench wedges between the tire and the seat tube to put back pressure on the wheel to keep it from creeping forward.
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelscycles View Post
    With the threaded ones, install the nut first, then the peg.
    Terrible advice. With threaded pegs, only install the peg, because it takes the place of the axle nut. Putting a nut between the peg and dropout gives the peg extra leverage.

    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    I have a hard time installing threadless pegs on many bikes. The large contact surface between the peg and dropout seems to induce axle creep, throwing off the alignment and screwing up the chain tension. I've tried applying grease to the dropout/peg surfaces, and slowly tightening the axle bolts, alternating them, and I can get it, but it takes many trials.
    Don't apply grease between the peg and dropout, because that's just going to induce axle creep via lubrication of a surface that's already sliding.

    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    Sometimes I use the long, padded handle of a Park pedal wrench wedges between the tire and the seat tube to put back pressure on the wheel to keep it from creeping forward.
    Flip the bike over, step on the back tire, and tighten down the non-peg side enough so that it's somewhat locked, then pull back on the peg to straighten the wheel out while tightening that side all the way down, and then lock out the non-peg side.

    edit: Do they even have threaded pegs on anything but Walmart bikes anymore?
    Last edited by CMcMahon; 01-04-10 at 10:32 AM.

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    Senior Member jcharles00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMcMahon View Post
    edit: Do they even have threaded pegs on anything but Walmart bikes anymore?
    I can't imagine. In fact, I don't even think walmart pegs are threaded any more. Which raises a valid point to the OP - don't put threaded pegs on anything. ever. It's like pleading for bent axles and stripped threads. Use un-threaded pegs, without a washer, and with a tensioner if you're worried about it slipping. At least, thats what I've found to be the best course of action over the years.

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    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMcMahon View Post
    Terrible advice. With threaded pegs, only install the peg, because it takes the place of the axle nut. Putting a nut between the peg and dropout gives the peg extra leverage.



    Don't apply grease between the peg and dropout, because that's just going to induce axle creep via lubrication of a surface that's already sliding.



    Flip the bike over, step on the back tire, and tighten down the non-peg side enough so that it's somewhat locked, then pull back on the peg to straighten the wheel out while tightening that side all the way down, and then lock out the non-peg side.

    edit: Do they even have threaded pegs on anything but Walmart bikes anymore?
    Thanks, that makes sense. I want the inner surface of the peg to bite into the outer surface of the dropout, not "roll" along it's length. Kinda funny that I didn't even think about taking advantage of the leverage a peg offers to hold a wheel in position while tightening the nuts.
    We had a TON of pegs on boxes. The previous bike tech avoided installing them either because they were a pain, or because they made the bikes harder to put in and take out of the display racks. We had far more unthreaded pegs than threaded.
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
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