Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    990 Brake mounts + Caliper brakes?

    From reading the forums, I've figured out that 990 brake mounts = u-brake mounts.

    Can someone tell me explicitly though if these caliper brakes would be compatible with 990 mounts? Or is that whole distinct brake mount situation?

    For the record, I am aware this makes little to no sense but I am getting experimental here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    253
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    First, those are not caliper brakes. Those are Cantilever brakes.
    This is a caliper brake: http://www.danscomp.com/484009.php?cat=PARTS

    Now to answer your question, no the brakes in your link will not work with 990 (U-Brake) mounts.
    The pivot point on 990s (where the brake mounts to the frame) is above the rim. The pivot point on cantis & V-brakes are below the rim
    -Bill

  3. #3
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    My Bikes
    '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '98 Fuji Touring w/ Shimano Nexus premium, '06 Jamis Nova 853 cross frame set up as commuter, '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro 853 back up training bike
    Posts
    701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wds178 View Post
    First, those are not caliper brakes. Those are Cantilever brakes.
    This is a caliper brake: http://www.danscomp.com/484009.php?cat=PARTS

    Now to answer your question, no the brakes in your link will not work with 990 (U-Brake) mounts.
    The pivot point on 990s (where the brake mounts to the frame) is above the rim. The pivot point on cantis & V-brakes are below the rim
    -Bill
    Is the different pivot point just to accommodate the different brake designs, or is there an advantage to having one or the other as far as braking performance? I noticed that some U-brakes posts are mounted on the seat stays, while some are mounted on the chain stays. Is there an advantage to either mounting location?
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  4. #4
    Senior Member tyler11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    208
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    Is the different pivot point just to accommodate the different brake designs, or is there an advantage to having one or the other as far as braking performance? I noticed that some U-brakes posts are mounted on the seat stays, while some are mounted on the chain stays. Is there an advantage to either mounting location?
    that is a good question

  5. #5
    n00b
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    My Bikes
    Surly Karate Monkey, Pake C'mute
    Posts
    283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    chainstay mounts under the chain stays means you can run any brake with a small drivetrain (such as 25/9, a very popular combo) and not worry about the chain rubbing on the brake. I have a frame with lowered chainstays (welded a little lower on the BB shell), low-profile Fly brake, and low-profile mounts, so I can run a 27/10 ratio without any problem. some say that chainstay brakes work better, but I think it has more to do with the dialed-ness of the brake setup you have.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •