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  1. #301
    happy bike wishes Turtle Speed's Avatar
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    Yeah! Actually I was looking at that exact pair, but that site has them for way cheaper. Only thing is the shipping costs...

    Seems like all the LBS places jack the prices way up... :\

  2. #302
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turtle Speed View Post
    Seems like all the LBS places jack the prices way up... :\
    LBS have to pay the sales person and the landlord. brick and mortar stores can't usually compete price-wise. but you don't have to wait for shipping.

    i think i paid 5-6 bucks for a set of u brake pads.. can't find the package with the price tag
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  3. #303
    Senior Member zukahn1's Avatar
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    With a little Shopping I have found fairly nice brake pads for all setups in full sets of four for front and rear for under $15 with shipping.

  4. #304
    happy bike wishes Turtle Speed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frantik View Post
    LBS have to pay the sales person and the landlord. brick and mortar stores can't usually compete price-wise. but you don't have to wait for shipping.
    I understand that, but when the LBS's start asking almost $10 for an innertube, and it's not even a special one (e.g. a thorn-resistant), then c'mon maaaan.


    Anyway.


    Any bike flippers have recommendations on doing shifting cable overhauls on the cheap? Should I just bag up some parts?
    Cable --> http://www.ebikestop.com/jagwire_sli...mpy-CA4446.php
    Housing --> http://www.ebikestop.com/jagwire_4mm...ack-CA4310.php

    Good idea/bad idea? Are those compatible? Can I use that shift housing for non-10 speeds? I work on old bikes with 5- and 7-speed freewheels all the time.

  5. #305
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
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    when i redo a bike i buy shifter cables with housing and brake cables w/o housing, and just use the extra housing that I don't use with the shifter cables. not as cheap as 50ft for $12 but not too bad
    1986 Diamondback Apex ~ 1988 Diamondback Ascent EX ~ 1989 Jamis Dakar ~ 1989 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp
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  6. #306
    Senior Member ahandley's Avatar
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    You can get complete pack (font & rear brake and shifter) at wally world for about $6. Usually don't like wally world, but this is ok deal. 0003501100002_180X180.jpg

  7. #307
    Fat Man on a Lightweight Big Dee's Avatar
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    Fascinating thread. I've been thinking about flipping bikes and just came across this discussion. After hours of reading thru all of the posts, I've gleaned a lot of advice that I hope will save me time, frustration, and money. I aim to get started this week. Already have a couple of leads that I plan to follow up on today.
    1980 Schwinn Super Le Tour

  8. #308
    Senior Member PatTheSlat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahandley View Post
    You can get complete pack (font & rear brake and shifter) at wally world for about $6. Usually don't like wally world, but this is ok deal.
    Just remember that with the Wal Mart cable sets, the cables are steel, which means they'll rust, and the housings are both unlined (which again means eventual rust) and not compressionless (so they may not work with indexed drivetrains). They also just raised the price on them from $5 to $7. Alright if you're flipping a cheapo low-end bike, but not something I'd ever want to use on something I'm keeping, and I wouldn't feel right using them on something nice.

  9. #309
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    I fail to see how this is a problem. It means when you finally get a bargain, you can sell at high prices.

    What are you after? A bike to ride for cheap, or profits on bikes?

  10. #310
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    He didn't say it's a problem. He gave more information so one can make a more informed choice. Sometimes you want good, sometimes you want cheap.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

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  11. #311
    back in the saddle bent-not-broken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frantik View Post
    when i redo a bike i buy shifter cables with housing and brake cables w/o housing, and just use the extra housing that I don't use with the shifter cables. not as cheap as 50ft for $12 but not too bad
    Brake cables and shifter cables are not the same. Brake cables need to be stiffer, typically coil wound so that the don'e compress under the higher load of braking.
    Bent

    When the earth is covered with 2/3's beer, then I'll buy bottled water!

  12. #312
    Senior Member PatTheSlat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bent-not-broken View Post
    Brake cables and shifter cables are not the same. Brake cables need to be stiffer, typically coil wound so that the don'e compress under the higher load of braking.
    Sort of the opposite of that, actually... brake cables can be coil wound because it doesn't matter if they compress a bit. Indexed shift cable housing is compressionless because if it compressed it would throw off the indexing, but can't handle the higher forces that brake cable housing needs to. With friction shifting rather than indexed, coil wound cables can be (and were) used.

  13. #313
    Senior Member curbtender's Avatar
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    Anybody know anything about this swap? http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/bik/3676184223.html

  14. #314
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    I don't flip bikes, just buy old ones to ride or take them when abandoned (w/ potential). My basic rule in buying is to only buy vintage ones my size as the real pleasure for me is riding old bikes as well as the overhaul. The few I have sold in the last year were all to free up space/appease the household CFO. My only real goal when selling is to free up resources and provide a bike I know is road worthy / ready to carry another potential rider for many miles yet. That is the pleasure, seeing old bikes still cranking it out after some loving work.

  15. #315
    Senior Member matimeo's Avatar
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    I started flipping bikes when I was in college after I restored my first vintage road bike. I found that all kinds of bicycles were readily available at local thrift stores in the college town where I lived. I’d often find bikes from $8-20 that I could flip the next day with minimal cleanup and tuning for $100 or more. Even found some nicer vintage bikes priced cheap because apparently nobody knew what they were worth. It was trial and error at first, but with experience you learn what things are worth, what to avoid, what to jump on. The landlady was nice and didn't say anything about the pile up of bikes and parts on her back patio.

    Now that I live in Portland, OR, I can’t find a bike at a thrift store to save my life. I've flipped a few in the five years I've lived here if I just happen to bump into something good at a thrift store or garage sale, but that almost never happens.

    The most important lesson I learned when I did it actively was this: if it became a job rather than a hobby, I totally lost interest in it. Now I do it when I can because it’s fun and because I can make a little extra cash to spend on my hobby. I think if I ever tried to make a business out of it, I’d lost interest. That’s why I don’t do any spreadsheets or anything- not that there’s anything wrong with that, that’s just how I roll.
    El secreto, por lo demás, no vale lo que valen los caminos que me condujeron a él. Esos caminos hay que andarlos. Jorge Luis Borges, El Etnógrafo

  16. #316
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    A writer for the New York Times went to Portland just to report on the used bike scene there. She said since it's a very cycling city, car values are low and bike values are sky high. Used bikes start at $450 and go up from there.

    She said in Phoenix, where people don't ride much, car values are high and bike values are low. In theory, you could cycle from Phoenix to Portland, sell your bike, buy a car, drive back to Phoenix and sell the car. Of course, you could start this cycle in Portland instead. But you'd need a lot of time to do this.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
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  17. #317
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    I flip mostly for the pleasure of hunting on craigslist and working on bikes. So far, the biggest thing I've learned is KNOW YOUR MARKET. I am living in a college town and fixed-gear and road bikes are the rage right now. Luckily, there are suburbs outside of the city with people getting rid of the bikes they've had since the 70s-80s. When spring comes around, I can easily sell good mid-range road bikes in the 200-300 range that I bought for 50-125 after getting them road worthy. There is another flipper in town that has the same group of mountain and hybrid bikes that are cheap and would make fine and practical commuter bikes but have been relisted for over a year.

    People spending 200-300 for a bike usually don't care if the derailleurs are vintage Campy, but they do care if it rides, brakes, and shifts smoothly. Take the time to road test everything and make sure that you aren't selling a bike that you wouldn't ride unless you make that clear any problems to a buyer. Because I like to ride everything I work on, I stay away from frames that are way too big for me.

    I have also found that many people buying in this range are more impressed that I have wrapped new bar tape and throw in some $5 silicone lights than when I put together a complete french drive train for an old Motobecane. Aesthetics really count. Good paint and a clean bike make selling much easier.

    As the previous posters have said, you do not make much profit, especially if you take the time (which I always do) to replace worn cables, tires, tubes, grips, and brake pads. If you look on ebay, you can buy handlebar tape from Chinese sellers for around 3-4 dollars a pair. I have had stuff lost or take forever shipping from overseas, so be cautious. I basically fund my future bike purchases through my reselling, so it is a hobby that pays for (some of) itself.

  18. #318
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Thrifty Bill, where do you keep all these donor bikes? Do you disassemble them partially to stack them in tight?
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  19. #319
    Senior Member ahandley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spathfinder3408 View Post
    Dittos on this issue. I have been fixing and flippin bikes for almost 4 years and do it because I like it. Most don't realize its a labor of love. Once in awhile I get a good deal on a bike and don't have to do much to resale it, but thats not the usual. Most bikes I rebuild everything, all bearings and make sure the tires are excellent or new. I always match and touch up scratches on frame and finish with a complete cleaning and wax job. I always take a test ride to make sure everything works right. And i would sell those bikes to my mother. Selling a bike to a person that gets a smile on their face when they take it for a ride and saying ,"I like it", makes it all worthwhile. Classic bike saved and passing on to a new owner is all worth it. I just make a little play money doing this, but self satisfaction in what I do is better then my regular day job. I am retiring soon and will take this hobby with me
    I have been flipping for a few years now. If I took a look at the amount of time I spend on repairing or replacing parts, I would go broke. i usually tear a bike totally down and rebuild, unless it is in very, very good shape. I have learned to steer away from cheap Walmart or Kmart bikes unless it is for parts only. Seats and tires must be excellent on these or I don't even consider. And most of the time the seat or tires is all that I was after to begin with. I like to find several for sale at the same time, buying in bulk for a cheaper price.

    I don't like to mess with anything that I can't sell for $150 - $200 quickly. When you get up into the $300 and above market, most buyers are like us and know what they want.

    Each bicycle I intend to sell gets a couple test rides and I tell the buyer if anything is wrong with it or they don't like it I will buy it back. i wouldn't extend that offer to cheaper bikes or if I did not believe that I have rebuilt quality bicycle, I have only bought one back. I have even had people bring their friends back to buy.

    I enjoy rebuilding something that was to be trashed and if someone gets a good deal and I make a little ... so be it. Circle of life.

  20. #320
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    Now I have flipped a fair number of bikes, considering I'm still in my teens. I also live in one of the most cycling interested countries in the world, and that is both good and bad.

    The pros are the extremely high selling prices - I can sell bikes at ridiculously high percentages of the value the bike had from new. We are talking a minimum of 50 percent, just as long as the bike is just rideable, and a lot more if it's in good condition.

    The cons are of cause the high purchasing prices. I have never bought a bike for less than the equivalent of $100, and that is even including crazy worn out bikes.

    There are a lot of great advice in this threat already, and it is coming from people with a lot more experience than me. But I believe that I got a few things worth adding, or at least repeating.

    1) First of all, make a choice. Do you want to make the most money you possibly can, or is this just a hobby? If you really wanna make a lot of money, you can't afford the luxury of being a gentlemen. Think like a used car salesmen. Maximize your profit, minimize your spending.

    2) Make a great add, that really captivates people. If you have a nice bike, take nice pictures. Write down every little thing in the add - in my experience it makes a huge difference if you write "Nice bike" and use only one picture, or if you really write about all the nice features the bike has, and put six or seven good quality pictures in the add.

    3) Know your target demographic. I primarily sell bikes to kids from 18-29. These are young people, whom have little knowledge about bikes, and have parents with thick wallets to back them up financially. This mean aesthetics is the priority. They don't care if the headset is Chris King, they care about the color and "feel" of the bike. So for me it would be a complete waste to put a nice $100 headset on a bike, because it wouldn't add a lot to my final selling price.

    4) Get to know the right people. I get a pair of nice, fashionable gumwall tires for about $20. And this is in a country, where everything is a lot more expensive then the U.S. because of taxes and what not. This is because I know the right guy. If I didn't know him, I would be paying $60-$80 instead.
    I am also lucky to know the best mechanic in town, because we used to ride in the same club. Because of this, and because I generally bring him a lot of business means I get a pretty fair discount, whenever I need parts/things fixed etc. So get to know people in the bicycle community!

    And that's all I can think of, on the top of my head. I have flipped somewhere between 50-100 bikes within the last year and a half, and never once lost money. So for me it's a fairly lucrative way to finance my own hobbies and a lot of other luxuries, that I otherwise would not be able to afford.

    PS: Sorry if I made a crazy long post!
    I change bikes as other people changes underwear

  21. #321
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    I dont know if it has been covered here in the flipping 101, but what about buying stolen bikes? I purchased a bianchi at what I thought was a great deal only to re-list it on craigslist. I met up with a buyer only to have him show up with 2 cops saying that the bike is stolen.

    The guy gets his bike back, which is awesome. But im out of money and I could have possible legal problems in the future? I didn't know it was stolen and in no way participated in its theft. Lose/Lose for me. Pretty lame, IMO

  22. #322
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zupreme View Post
    I dont know if it has been covered here in the flipping 101, but what about buying stolen bikes? I purchased a bianchi at what I thought was a great deal only to re-list it on craigslist. I met up with a buyer only to have him show up with 2 cops saying that the bike is stolen.

    The guy gets his bike back, which is awesome. But im out of money and I could have possible legal problems in the future? I didn't know it was stolen and in no way participated in its theft. Lose/Lose for me. Pretty lame, IMO

    It's been covered in other threads. Was your purchase deal too good to be true? Did you buy it from a homeowner or meet in some out of the way place? Those are pretty telltale clues it's hot.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
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  23. #323
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    A writer for the New York Times went to Portland just to report on the used bike scene there. She said since it's a very cycling city, car values are low and bike values are sky high. Used bikes start at $450 and go up from there.

    She said in Phoenix, where people don't ride much, car values are high and bike values are low. In theory, you could cycle from Phoenix to Portland, sell your bike, buy a car, drive back to Phoenix and sell the car. Of course, you could start this cycle in Portland instead. But you'd need a lot of time to do this.

    oddjob2 and I had that discussion, I can buy vintage road bike down here in Tampa for next to nothing. I don't bother because after my time and expenses there's no profit to made. I told oddjob2 if I bought every bike I could I'd be able to fill a 50 ft. UHaul truck. That would be one hell of a road trip, a 50 ft UHaul jam packed heading to Portland! Figure 300 bikes @ $300 per bike = $90,000 minus expences of $150 per bike plus the truck food and lodging.

    Hmmm....

    Expences:

    Bikes: 300 bikes @ $150 = $45,000
    U Haul truck one way: $300
    3 night hotel/2 rooms: $300
    7 days in hotel in Portland: $350
    Food n stuff X 2 X 7 days: $350
    Miscellaneous costs: $4K

    So maybe I'm in for $50K to run 300 bikes in ride ready condition up to Portland. I guess $40K is a nice profit...now, if I only didn't have such a good job.


    Quote Originally Posted by zupreme View Post
    I dont know if it has been covered here in the flipping 101, but what about buying stolen bikes? I purchased a bianchi at what I thought was a great deal only to re-list it on craigslist. I met up with a buyer only to have him show up with 2 cops saying that the bike is stolen.

    The guy gets his bike back, which is awesome. But im out of money and I could have possible legal problems in the future? I didn't know it was stolen and in no way participated in its theft. Lose/Lose for me. Pretty lame, IMO
    It's a chance we all take. Over the years I'm sure I've bought a stolen bike or two but never intentionally and that's the key. The way I see it is if I don't buy the bike someone else will.
    Last edited by miamijim; 05-31-13 at 04:22 PM.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  24. #324
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miamijim View Post
    oddjob and I had that discussion, I can buy vintage road bike down here in Tampa for next to nothing. I don't bother because after my time and expenses there's no profit to made. I told oddjob if I bought every bike I could I'd be able to rent a huge U-Haul truck. That would be one hell of a road trip, a 50 ft U-Haul jam packed with vintage bikes.

    Destination, WRK101's workshop in Hootersville!

    Rumor has it, his inventory is dwindling!
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
    2014 Additions: 1985 Trek 560, 1992 Trek Multitrack 700 (my 2nd), 1994 Trek Carbon 2200, Peugeot PX-10, 1981 Schwinn Voyager, 1989 Bridgestone RB-1

  25. #325
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oddjob2 View Post
    Destination, WRK101's workshop in Hootersville!

    Rumor has it, his inventory is dwindling!
    The only problem is that WRK would have Homeland Security knocking on his door because they want to know why he's buying oxalic acid in 50 gallon drums.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

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