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  1. #1
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    Schwinn from the 80's

    Hey all,

    New to the forums, but a long time bike rider.

    My mother recently moved, and had an old Schwinn hanging up in her garage. It's not in the best shape, but it isn't that bad either.

    I'm looking for help identifying the year. It looks like its from the 80's (I'm going to take a guess at 85) but I'm not sure.

    Also, I would like some suggestions on making it rideable again.What should I replace, and where can I find the parts?

    Thanks!WP_20140607_13_04_22_Pro.jpgWP_20140607_13_04_12_Pro.jpgWP_20140607_12_06_18_Pro.jpgWP_20140607_12_06_00_Pro.jpg

  2. #2
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    1983 would be my guess

    Define rideable? What's your budget?

  3. #3
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
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    It's an '83 World Sport. It has a Hi-Tensile frame and entry level components, so at 33 1/2 pounds for a 23" frame is quite heavy. At a minimum, clean and grease all of the bearings (headset, bottom bracket, hubs), check and replace brake and derailleur cables as necessary, check and replace tires and tubes if necessary, check and replace brake pads if necessary, check chain, chainrings, and rear cogs for wear, lubricate any mechanism that moves, .... you get the picture.



    - Stan

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    Date code is on the head badge, no need for others to guess.
    Thrifty Bill,

    How do you read a Schwinn date code? I have a mid-80's(?) Schwinn Peloton that I'm trying to date.

    Thanks, Dick

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    The headbadge stamp indicates the day the bike was built. It's a 4-digit number dddY where ddd is the ordinal day (of the year) and Y is the last digit of the year. For example 1234 would indicate the 123rd day of 1984, or Wed. May 2nd, 1984.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    1983 would be my guess

    Define rideable? What's your budget?
    I would like to try and do a lot of it myself. Never really worked on a bike before, but this isn't a daily commuter or anything, so I have time to tinker around with it.

    As far as rideable.... I would like the bike to be safe, function properly, and look halfway decent. I don't want to do a full restore on an 83 World Sport, but I would like to clean it up a bit.

    I've started to poke around a little online, and it seems that finding the parts may be a challenge. Here's what I've noticed about the bike:

    The brakes will need to be replaced. I'm guessing just the cables and the pads. The left side brake still works good actually. Stops the bike on a dime. The right one doesn't work at all, but the cable is noticeably bad.

    The derailleur is broken. I don't know much about the suntour detrailleurs, but this one looks shot. The left side gear appears to be stuck completely. The right side lever moves, but doesn't switch the gear.

    Tires (obviously) and tubes. Also, the wheels are a little rusty in patches. Not sure if they will be ok or not. I might have the bike shop look at them, since I will want to get them trued anyhow.

    Any ideas where to find the parts?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwpjr View Post
    I would like to try and do a lot of it myself. Never really worked on a bike before, but this isn't a daily commuter or anything, so I have time to tinker around with it.

    As far as rideable.... I would like the bike to be safe, function properly, and look halfway decent. I don't want to do a full restore on an 83 World Sport, but I would like to clean it up a bit.

    I've started to poke around a little online, and it seems that finding the parts may be a challenge. Here's what I've noticed about the bike:

    The brakes will need to be replaced. I'm guessing just the cables and the pads. The left side brake still works good actually. Stops the bike on a dime. The right one doesn't work at all, but the cable is noticeably bad.

    The derailleur is broken. I don't know much about the suntour detrailleurs, but this one looks shot. The left side gear appears to be stuck completely. The right side lever moves, but doesn't switch the gear.

    Tires (obviously) and tubes. Also, the wheels are a little rusty in patches. Not sure if they will be ok or not. I might have the bike shop look at them, since I will want to get them trued anyhow.

    Any ideas where to find the parts?
    For the most part, Stan nailed it as far as what should be replaced for the bike to be safe... all of those "consumable" things.

    At the very least, I would buy new brake levers and ditch the style that is on there which is often referred to as a "suicide" lever. Any $20 set from Tektro (or rebadged by Cane Creek or Origin8 or whoever) will work, as long as it is made for "short pull" road-style brakes. You can find these anywhere online from Amazon to a dedicated bike shop. If you want the extra levers on the flat part of the bar, you can spend another $20 or so for brake interrupters (just make sure you get the correct clamp size to match your handlebars).

    The other thing that I would personally want to change is the stem-shifters. Unfortunately, your frame lacks the braze-ons for a proper downtube shifter so you'd have to mount them with a clamp. Personally, I'd probably switch to bar end style shifters in friction-mode, but it's personal preference. I just can't stand the shifters on the stem. That was the first thing to go on my 76 Motobecane. Both the shifter style and the brake style on that bike were only seen on lower end bikes, so don't feel obligated to keep them for any historical significance... they were a bad design, and there are better alternatives available now that accomplish the same end.

    Beyond those two things, and all of the consumable stuff that Stan mentioned, I'd be happy with the bike. You could go further, but there's a cost/benefit issue at that point and it's not worth modifying the frame or changing out the wheels and brakes or anything like that.

    I'd spray the brakes with a little penetrating oil at the pivots and see if they seem to work OK. If not, I'd just buy a new set of calipers... not sure if they are regular size or long-reach, but I wouldn't worry about that at this point. Hopefully the work just fine. Whatever the case, a modern brake caliper will work if need be. You definitely want new pads, salmon colored pads from Kool-stop are what most people recommend for the best braking.

    Regarding rust... on the rims/spokes, you can try to just clean it off with some steel-wool. Don't use too rough a grit or it will scratch them up. Start fine and work your way courser until it cleans up. You can also use a dab of phosphoric acid in spots to convert the iron-oxide that is rust into iron-phosphate. Sand off anything that is loose that the steel wool didn't take care of.

    An older version of Sutherland's book may be helpful http://home.fuse.net/pieper/sutherla...0mechanics.pdf
    As will the Park Tool website and Sheldon Brown's website with how to do all of that maintenance.
    If you want a physical book in your hand, Zinn's road bike maintenance book is good.

  8. #8
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    For the most part, Stan nailed it as far as what should be replaced for the bike to be safe... all of those "consumable" things.

    At the very least, I would buy new brake levers and ditch the style that is on there which is often referred to as a "suicide" lever. Any $20 set from Tektro (or rebadged by Cane Creek or Origin8 or whoever) will work, as long as it is made for "short pull" road-style brakes. You can find these anywhere online from Amazon to a dedicated bike shop. If you want the extra levers on the flat part of the bar, you can spend another $20 or so for brake interrupters (just make sure you get the correct clamp size to match your handlebars).

    The other thing that I would personally want to change is the stem-shifters. Unfortunately, your frame lacks the braze-ons for a proper downtube shifter so you'd have to mount them with a clamp. Personally, I'd probably switch to bar end style shifters in friction-mode, but it's personal preference. I just can't stand the shifters on the stem. That was the first thing to go on my 76 Motobecane. Both the shifter style and the brake style on that bike were only seen on lower end bikes, so don't feel obligated to keep them for any historical significance... they were a bad design, and there are better alternatives available now that accomplish the same end.
    The above are not necessary to make it rideable, more aesthetic concerns than any other reason, but at the end of the day, it is still a World Sport.

    Walmart or Dicks for a Bell Cable Kit, all four for about $7-$8 or this incredible deal.
    http://www.doitbest.com/Bicycle+acce...sku-815144.dib
    Niagara Cycle for the following:
    Low cost tire Kenda K3627" tires atabout $8.50 sac
    Tube of choice
    Handlebar tape to replace the crusty foam
    Diacompe grey matter brake shoes, about $9 for 4
    Tube of Park Grease, about $7.00
    Chain lube of choice
    Last edited by oddjob2; 06-08-14 at 04:46 AM.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
    2014 Additions: 1985 Trek 560, 1992 Trek Multitrack 700 (my 2nd), 1994 Trek Carbon 2200, Peugeot PX-10, 1981 Schwinn Voyager, 1989 Bridgestone RB-1

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by oddjob2 View Post
    The above are not necessary to make it rideable, more aesthetic concerns than any other reason, but at the end of the day, it is still a World Sport.
    I thought I was rather clear that *I* would do this or that, that it was personal preference, and that it was above and beyond what is necessary... I'm trying to tell the guy what is out there, it's his choice how he wants to customize it beyond the basics, of course.

    If we are going to go absolute minimalist and cheap on this, why even suggest the over-priced Park grease... just buy some marine grease at the local auto shop.

  10. #10
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    Since you are new to working on bikes, but seem to be willing to give it a go, I would recommend that you go to Park Tool's website and do some reading. Then go to Sheldon Brown's website and do some more reading.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog
    Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information

    If you don't have the proper tools, you'll find out what you need, and you'll learn how to do the work properly. You may also discover that some work may best be performed by a pro. Your rear derailler may be OK - I would cut the cable and try to move it by hand before I gave up on it. I'd make it just rideable before I'd make it right.

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