Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-14-16, 02:05 PM   #1
atalamark
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Curious about Guidonnet levers on Radonneur type bars/bike??

Howdy folks--

So I've been eyeing some of the DiaCompe Guidonnet style levers for some time, mostly because I'm considering moving to a more upright bar position and think they look good on the Porteur style bars.

In my research though I commonly see these type levers mounted on drop bars, specifically Randonneur type bars.

This link has a good example but there are many:


https://vintagebicycle.wordpress.com...icycle-c-1948/

I guess I just don't understand the utility of this. I have Randonneur bars (old SR) on my Peugeor right now, and for me they make riding on the hoods/ramps as well as the drops a little more comfy than on regular drops.

I do use the tops sometimes just for a change of position, but because the bars flare, its not what I would call a comfortable position.

So, can anyone tell me, if what I've come to learn about the Randonneur bars is true, then why were they used so much on the old French Randonneur bikes, which were made for distance riding, given that the braking can only happen on the tops of the bars, which isn't the most comfortable position?

Maybe I'm missing something, enlighten me!!

Mk
atalamark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 04:37 PM   #2
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 9,979
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
I can't tell you why these were used in the past, but I can say that I set up one bike with drop bars and guidonnet levers (shown below) and really hated it. I realized that I far preferred to have my hands on the brake hoods for most of my riding.

nlerner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 04:54 PM   #3
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,928
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
I have thought about trying to combine guidonnet levers and regular levers, to get the c&v non-aero equivalent of the inline/cx lever position. The problem is that the Problem Solvers device that lets two levers pull over brake is large and unsightly.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 05:26 PM   #4
echo victor 
bicyclatte!
 
echo victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by atalamark View Post
...
So, can anyone tell me, if what I've come to learn about the Randonneur bars is true, then why were they used so much on the old French Randonneur bikes, which were made for distance riding, given that the braking can only happen on the tops of the bars, which isn't the most comfortable position?

Maybe I'm missing something, enlighten me!!
Mk
Well, I'm not an expert, but I believe the intent is that guidonnet levers could be used from either the tops or the ramps (due to the forward curved portion of the levers). If someone were riding a long time and knew they'd be likely to spend a lot of time with their hands in those positions, then it would make sense to have the brakes there rather than in the more common lever position which assumed hands in the drops. As was recently stated,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldairhead View Post
...after 500 kilometers your arms are too short. ...
And randonneur bars differ a bit from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some people find the tops of certain models to be quite comfortable. For instance, I really like the tops of the GB randonneur bars on my Gran Sport.
__________________
If someone can pour a Guinness with a cycle instead of a shamrock on top, I'll update my profile pic.
echo victor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 05:46 PM   #5
pfaustus
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Bikes: 1979? Motobecane Super Touring, 1980? Trek 620, 1964 Dunelt, 1991 Specialized Hardrock Comp
Posts: 49
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I tried them on my motobecane, based on the same old photos of French bikes. I hated it too. Two rides later, they came off. Maybe if you had the really swoopy rando bars like Compass sells?
pfaustus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 08:21 PM   #6
atalamark
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by echo victor View Post
Well, I'm not an expert, but I believe the intent is that guidonnet levers could be used from either the tops or the ramps (due to the forward curved portion of the levers). If someone were riding a long time and knew they'd be likely to spend a lot of time with their hands in those positions, then it would make sense to have the brakes there rather than in the more common lever position which assumed hands in the drops. As was recently stated,



And randonneur bars differ a bit from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some people find the tops of certain models to be quite comfortable. For instance, I really like the tops of the GB randonneur bars on my Gran Sport.

I just found somewhere online an old Mafac scan which showed someone reaching down with 1 finger to the Guidonnet lever with hands on the ramps.

So that makes a lot more sense really, you can brake from the tops and all the way around until you can't reach anymore. They look darn cool that's for sure.

Mk
atalamark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-16, 09:26 PM   #7
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Orangevale CA
Bikes: '76 Paramount, 02 Hardrock, '98 C'Dale XR800, '04 Burley Samba, '15 Priority Classic
Posts: 5,690
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
I think you'd be better off with levers de dinde, or interrupteurs
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:54 PM.