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Old 05-09-06, 09:50 PM   #1
rollsroyce
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modern-ish drivetrain components on classic bikes?

I'm building an 80's Ciocc San Cristobal to use as my daily rider/primary ride/commuter. The chainrings, front and rear derailleurs are period Campy super record. I'm debating on my freewheel and chain selection. Initially I intended to use a NOS Regina chain and 6sp freewheel, you know period stuff, but since I've already installed a cartridge bottom bracket and will be using later campy aero levers, I'm beginning to wonder if I might stand to gain any shifting improvements using a later-period freewheel (shimano or suntour with beveled/twisted teeth and ramps) and a newer chain. So what do you think? Stick with the period stuff? or modernize? Is the "blasphemous" act of putting these components on my bike worth the little improvement in shifting? Any freewheel or chain suggestions? Thanks!

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Old 05-09-06, 09:59 PM   #2
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It's your bike. Do what you want. If this is to be a commuter, then by all means go for the smoothest shift and reliability. You can always return it to period correct.
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Old 05-09-06, 10:09 PM   #3
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I'm not really concerned about what other people might think about me using certain componentry, but more concerned about just how much of an improvement I stand to gain by using a more modern freewheel and chain. I intend to use the SR derailleurs and crankset.

edit: I just realized how poorly titled this thread is. Sorry I should have probably been more specific...
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Old 05-10-06, 12:22 AM   #4
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Using a modern freewheel will greatly improve shifting, due to the tooth profile. I think that your rear spacing is 126 mm, so you can probably even use a 7-speed Shimano Megarange freewheel with a big ol' bailout gear. How's that for blasphemy?

I lean towards chains with a quick-disconnect link, like SRAM powerlinks, especially on a commuter. I'm too lazy to properly clean a chain if I can't easily take it off the bike and drop it into some solvent.
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Old 05-10-06, 03:18 AM   #5
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All the shimano freewheels that are readily available are usually a wider range than I prefer. I'd like something around 13-20 instead of 14-28 or whatever it is thats more common. Anyone know of any modern freewheels available in that range? Or am I going to have to try and put one together myself? I've never done that.

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Using a modern freewheel will greatly improve shifting, due to the tooth profile. I think that your rear spacing is 126 mm, so you can probably even use a 7-speed Shimano Megarange freewheel with a big ol' bailout gear. How's that for blasphemy?

I lean towards chains with a quick-disconnect link, like SRAM powerlinks, especially on a commuter. I'm too lazy to properly clean a chain if I can't easily take it off the bike and drop it into some solvent.
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Old 05-10-06, 06:47 AM   #6
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I noticed a slight improvement in shifting when I switched from a Regina to a 5 speed Shimano HG, even though I'm using a vintage Regina chain. I think that 5 speed HG freewheels are fairly rare, in fact I've had people tell me that they don't exist.
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Old 05-10-06, 06:53 AM   #7
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I say go more modern.
The bike is a commuter, not a show piece.
I used suntour freewheels back in the day so it is
"period correct". An Ultra7 might get
you closer to the gearing you're looking for and give you an extra gear
without the frame needing to be spread. I believe an 8 speed chain will work with
this setup.
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Old 05-10-06, 07:26 AM   #8
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It's a matter of taste and some of it depends on what sort of choices you are making in terms of fit, bars, gearing and shifters

I've got 2 older bikes up and running currently. My '82 Trek 311 is the errand/beer bike and it has 6-speed with nice wide moustache bars and barcons. I find this upright position and easy access to the shifters to be better in traffic than dropped bars with DT shifters on a 6-speed friction drive train.

On the other hand, I had my '79 Trek 510 spread to 130mm spacing and have an indexing Shimano 8-speed drive train. I try going back to retro pure friction on that bike every few weeks and always end up going back to indexing. It is just so much easier for me to hit shifts on the modern cogs with indexing which is a big help in traffic. Rambling in the country, I can deal with friction but not in traffic.

Now, the biggest difference in my mind is the gearing options. With 6-speed gearing, I prefer wide range freewheels and half-step granny triples. But 8-speed cassettes pack enough gears in the back that I prefer a compact triple with a 24/36/48 set up. Modern alpine gearing. My point is that modern drivetrains open up interesting gearing options that didn't make sense back in the day.

Hope this helps
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Old 05-10-06, 06:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rollsroyce
All the shimano freewheels that are readily available are usually a wider range than I prefer. I'd like something around 13-20 instead of 14-28 or whatever it is thats more common.....
I've heard complaints about its lack of a 14-tooth cog, but the SunRace 13-24, 7-speed is available from Harris.
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Old 05-10-06, 06:08 PM   #10
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+1 on going modern. My little steel bike was 126mm spacing but a 130mm tiagra hub fits just fine. Steel is flexible.

I use a 10 speed 105 cassette 12-27, it used to be a 14-28 Suntour 5 speed. The shifting on the new stuff is awesome! Go for it!

The 80's triple crankset works fine with the new chain and cassette. It's currently 24/34/47.

Last edited by miyata610; 05-10-06 at 06:30 PM.
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