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  1. #26
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    Clive Stuart

    I thought while I was in the mood I would continue strolling down memory lane.

    My own CS frame was built by Bill Gray, we used to visit his workshop regularly and to a cycling mad teenager an absolute treasure house. As well as his fine racing frames, I was lucky enough to aquire one of his track frames also, he built novelty bikes for circus and stage performers. The type that steer the wrong way and mini bikes and uni-cycles. I did not know until much later but my brother owned a Bill Gray built Cycle Speedway bike. The scene was quite strong in the early Sixties, my brother rode for the Beckenham Monarchs, Beckenham being not a million miles from Wandsworth it all made perfect sense. I remember it was all chrome with a single low ratio freewheel, perfect for dirt tracking which is what I used it for. I am sure such a bike from that era is now a rarity. I would dearly love to still own the three BG's that have passed through my hands.

    The service car bike rack mentioned in an earlier posting was designed and built by Alec at the Orpington shop. It was a modern miracle of engineering and featured Campagnolo drop outs; I had a little hand in its construction and certainly witnessed much colourful language when fitting it to the afformentioned Ford Zodiac. The vehicle certainly generated much interest, especially when being driven round the South Circular. Alec and I were talking about it earlier this year, the whole hingeing mechanism was quite ingenious and the forerunner of what you see on team cars now; though I suspect they are not constructed on a driveway with a fourteen year old wielding a brazing torch. health and Safety inspectors would have had a field day. That and heating up baked beans with oxy-acetylene would in this modern age have had us closed down.

    Alecs frame building was very good, his eye for detail especially so; the sacrifice of course is speed and then as now people wanted their frames by yesterday which irritated the life out of Alec and made him slower. There is one on the Fixed Gear Gallery, but I am not sure it is one of his even though the transfers are correct. The relatively small number of frames built mean that both Clive Stuart and and Ken/Alec Bird frames have been somewhat overshadowed by other makes. This is a great shame because at the top of their game bikes were built to rival anything coming out of Italy.

    One last thing I don't think I have seen it posted but John Clary achieved, if that is the right word, the Lanterne Rouge riding a Clive Stuart.

    I will rack my brains and try and remember some other sippets.

  2. #27
    Rustbelt Rider mkeller234's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bibliobob View Post
    Thanks for the good historical info. We definitely need more. Now, if we could just get the good Doctor D. to return to the forum and post pics!
    I think he was actually banned.
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  3. #28
    Senior Member gaucho777's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloandy View Post
    My association with the Clive Stuart Orpington shop started in the Spring of 1968 ...
    Welcome to the forum & thanks for sharing this history!
    Last edited by gaucho777; 08-30-10 at 05:15 PM. Reason: added ellipsis to shorten long quote
    -Randy

    '72 Cilo Pacer '73 Speedwell Ti '74 Nishiki Competition '74 Peugeot UE-8 '86 Look Bernard Hinault 753 '86 Look KG86 '89 Parkpre Team Road '90ish Parkpre Team MTB

    Avatar photo courtesy of jeffveloart.com, contact: contact: jeffnil8 (at) gmail.com.

  4. #29
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    Hi,
    Great to learn a bit more of the history behind my first road frame back in the very early 70's. The only bit of trivia I can add is that I bought my Clive Stuart frame from Harry Halls, from the lovely man himself at his Cathedral street shop in Manchester. He was indeed a TDF mechanic, the shop was adorned with pics of him and his adapted Mini estate full of spare wheels etc.
    The frame served me well for a couple of years before a somersault over the top of a Rover 2000 resulted in two broken collar bones and one very broken frame.
    I do recall a decal on the rear of the seat tube which stated 'Handbuilt by Roger Kowalski' who I believe also went build Harry Hall frames for a while.

  5. #30
    Senior Member Grim's Avatar
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    What a cool thread that had so many people share so much history of some of the past English builders!

    Maybe some of you could help me figure out what I have. I am starting to think it came out of the Holdsworthy shops despite being told it was a Raleigh. The SN and some of the lug details seems to be in line with them for very late 70's. The original owner hailed from Oxford and dragged the bike to the US in the late 80's.
    Pictures and more detail here:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...t-this-Raleigh!
    You cant have a signature unless it fits in this box

  6. #31
    Senior Member bibliobob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkeller234 View Post
    I think he was actually banned.
    Wow! What are you going to tell me next? East Hill was arrested? Does anyone else miss all the "East Hill Alert!" posts?
    I grow old, I grow old. I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.

  7. #32
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    Fantastic thread, great info guys...............

  8. #33
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    Hi from a 'newbie' but who has been a member for ages but not posted for a long time! I was directed to this thread by Mavesyn as we are both members of Retrobike.co.uk and are classic enthusiasts. I've always been intrigued by the Clive Stuart set-up. They impacted on the UK race bike scene with great enthusiasm and seemed to have limitless pots of cash to spend. I liked the yellow and black scheme and had a Dave Russell built to copy it. In 1970 I rode to Stoke to visit the shop there when Brian Rourke was manager and bought a large 'bonk bag' which I'm sure I should still have - and I wish I could find it! It was/is yellow with the black logo. I also bought a pair of 'team' shorts but to comply with the draconian racing rules of 'no advertising - or else!' I had some of the letters unpicked and ended up with 'Live Art'. I've since found out I was not unique with this.

    I think that CS was also instrumental in getting 2 of the UK's top time triallists banned from racing by featuring them in a magazine advert. The photo in the advert showed Alf Engers and John Cornillie wearing CS tops and sword fencing on a display in the London Lord Mayor's Parade. The ever zealous officials of the RTTC governing body jumped on this like the proverbial ton of bricks and had them 'convicted' in a very short time. In hindsight I suppose it was a bit silly of the riders to allow it to happen but they wouldn't have known the picture was being taken and then used as it was.

    Looking through old magazines of the period I've seen several other riders than those mentioned above who also rode for the CS pro team. Peter Smith from York (ex top time triallist and roadman with Clifton CC) was one. Peter is still riding but not racing these days.

    Bill Grey also built for other people and I have a Dave Russell he built for Dave's 1973 Harrogate Show stand. It is a lugless one and the welding is really smooth. I also once had a lugged DR time trial frame that Dave told me was built by Bill.

  9. #34
    Senior Member Oldpeddaller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloandy View Post
    My association with the Clive Stuart Orpington shop started in the Spring of 1968 when I bought an orange second-hand Youngs road bike. It had belonged to Barry O'Leary, one of their team riders and though a little on the large side it was my pride and joy - twenty-nine pounds was the price tag and probably the weight. Later that summer I badgered Alec (Bird) into giving me a job, I was in the shop so often by that stage he took the view that I may as well make myself useful (sic). I made tea, which in Sixties bike shops was drunk in bladder busting quantities, filing lugs, cleaning the Biddilph brothers mathching Lotus Elans and painting the wheels on Alec's Mini Cooper all for ten shillings a day plus lunch and buns, there was a bakery almost next door.

    I learnt a huge amount and it was always great fun, I became particularly good at adjusting Campag headsets, bottom brackets and gluing on tubs, which I still do to this day. The team members as I remember were John Clary, Reg Smith, Barry O'Leary (mentioned above and still a friend) and George Drewell, Geoff Wiles and Reg Barnett were in the second incarnation of the team (69-70) season. I had by this time progressed to a flamboyant ruby red team with gold transfers team replica frame, still a mish mash of components but a vast improvement over the Youngs.

    When Alec opened up the Welling shop I went too, I have every reason to believe that the workbench we built is still there. On visits to the Catford shop I met Alec's brother Ken, this was usually en-route to Holdsworthys in Penge to pick up precious Campagnolo bits and all the other goodies, that warehouse is worth a volume of words on its own. The taste of Ken's tea made with condensed milk will stay with me forever - and not in a good way!. When the CS Welling shop became Bird Brothers I stayed, helping out over a number of years, even after starting a proper job. The quest for speed and lightness craved by Time-Trialists had begun in earnest so we entered the drilling era. In my view the bikes we built were some of the most beautiful machines ever on the racing scene, though how they stayed intact with so much metal removed is a mystery even now. Alf Engers, Joe Mummery, Mick Ballard, Steve Heffernan and a host of other great riders were regulars at the shop and in its day could be considered one of the best bike shops in England.

    Inevitably the friction between Ken and Alec became too much, their arguments were legendary, and Ken left to open his famous shop in Green Street Green. I stayed with Alec, but somehow remained friends with Ken. At one time I owned one each of their frames, I did conceive a plan to build up a bike and have it sprayed Kens white and Alecs pale blue with dual transfers but that may have pushed friendship a little far. Sadly Alec gave up the shop, the plan to concentrate on frame building, alas this did not work out. I am pleased to say I still meet up with him from time to time at bike jumbles. Ken of course died in early 2005 after closing his shop in the mid-nineties. It was sad to attend his funeral but it was a testament to his bike related stature that so many well known faces paid their respects to one of cyclings true characters.

    I would be happy to reply to anyone who wants to share their own memories. It sounds grumpy old manish, but the bike shops I have been involved with since those days do not compare in terms of fun and craftsmanship and I for one miss them.
    Hi Veloandy, the coincidences keep on coming! My first "real racing bike" was also an orange Youngs, given to me by a neighbour who lived down the road from me in Bearsted, near Maidstone when as a 15 year old boy I was inquisitively viewing some wheels through his open garage door! I built it up with all the Campag parts he gave me in a box, plus the best I could afford and showed it to him. He then he told me it was a gift! What a great guy and a really generous gesture that has also kept me hooked on bikes nearly 40 years later!

    The Youngs was also really too big for me then, but I totally loved that bike and treasured it for years. Alf Engers and Steve Heffernan were also role models to my club mates (We'd go to see them ride when we could) and and we often saw Joe Mummery's results mentioned in the cycling press. Over a year ago I bought some bike-related items from Joe's wife Anne on e-bay and had a short e-mail correspondence with her as she thought she might also have the Campagnolo 2 bolt seat post that I needed. Unfortunately it was the wrong size but it turned out she was also a keen cyclist and she offered to send me the Campag saddle spanner for it, free of charge if I managed to find one. I finally found the seat post I needed last week, but have not bothered her for the spanner. All my original Campagnolo tools were stolen in a garage burglary in 2001, the insurance Loss Adjuster could not find new replacements although they settled on an estimated value. These things are now difficult to find and really expensive but I can usually find or adapt other tools to fit.

    I also look back with nostalgia at the Kent and South London "Lightweight" shops of the late 1960's and early 1970's which had a unique almost club-like atmosphere and culture that was essentially British. Thanks for sharing your recollections!
    Oldpeddaller - The older I get, the better I used to be !!!" ***** If at first you don't succeed - hit it with a hammer.

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  10. #35
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    Hi Oldpeddaller and everyone else who is following this thread.

    Orange seemed to be a much used colour at Youngs for a time; when I bought my roadbike in CS they also had an orange Youngs track bike, which actually was my first choice, and still would be. Alec persuaded me, he could and still has a way with words, a road bike was more versatile. As was the custom back in the Sixties come the Winter I stripped everything off and made it into a fixed training bike. In that guise I stood more of a chance of keeping up anyway as everyone was limited to the same gear 72 inches.

    Out of interest the seat cluster had a cam arrangement with the allen bolt situated on the top-tube. It looked neat, but the reality was the seat post used to slip most annoyingly. The fast-back design on my first made to measure CS was just as neat and infinitely more secure.

    The opportunity for little design innovations was what made the bikes we built so special, and even the way the components parts were prepared made for truly hand-built bikes. I spent hours polishing cranks, hubs and beautiful chrome Berg spokes, we polished off, quite literally, dozens of tubes of Solvol Autosolv and tins of Brasso. Modern racing bikes may be very light and technologically advanced but they still have mass-produced written all over them. I have built up a lot of machines over the years and it is nigh on impossible to imput the human touch on carbon fibre. If a well prepared classic racing bike is put next to yet another black encrusted speed machine, there are no prizes for guessing which one gets all the attention.

    It is extremely pleasing the resurgent interest in steel framed bikes. In part this is due to bike couriers needing a tool to do the job, which won,t destroy itself when subjected to potholes. Also I think a new generation are beginning to appreciate that a steel bike is simply much nicer to ride, compared to an aluminium or carbon one.

    I have noticed over the last five years or so the rise in the cost of classic frames and complete bikes. Even not very good ones are now fetching high prices, and if a Holdsworth or any of the other well known names appear, well it's anyones guess. It is the same with components a couple of years ago I bought a pair on unused Campag Record on Arc en Ciel wheels for forty pounds, this year the skewers alone would cost that.
    The number of Bike Jumbles throughout the year is testament to the rise of interest in all things old bike, and I for one love it. I especially enjoy bumping into old faces who like me are a little greyer passion but the passion is still there.

    I seem to have strayed from the CS path, old bike people do like a bit of a rant and a ramble.

    VA

    I seem to have strayed off the CS track somewhat

  11. #36
    Junior Member jimhagan's Avatar
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    Hi Andy, staying on the Clive Stuart theme but on a more personal basis I wonder if you could mention my name to Alec having worked in the Catford shop (and spent a lot of time running it on my own due to the absence of Ken whilst he was away with the team) until the demise of CS of course I knew Alec very well at that time.

    It would be nice to hear from Alec or at least know how he is these days.

    Thanks

    Jim Hagan

  12. #37
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    Hello All

    Hi Jim,

    The next time I speak to Alec I will certainly mention you, like most people connected with bikes he has a very good memory. You will be pleased to know he is the same Alec he ever was a bit grumpy and opinionated but very good value. I saw him at the bike jumble in Knockholt earlier in the year and we had a bit of a rant about oversizesd tubes; headtubes in particular - brilliant.

    It is a great shame that in this internet buying led world the traditional lightweight shops have been severely squeezed; price over service. This is especially true at a time when Road cycling is staging (no pun intended) a comeback; people new to the sport are missing out on one of the elements that made cycling tick.

    Well that is probably enough of that.

    VA

  13. #38
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    You keep, ranting Veloandy, it's nice to hear.
    I agree with you, most bike shop's these days, have all the atmosphere of a supermarket. I'm lucky, in north Staffordshire, as we still have some traditional bike shop's in Brian Rourke's, Roy Swinnerton's and Henry Burton's, all now run by the son's of the original owners, although Brian is still very active, in the running of his shop, and even Roy Swinnerton, still pop's in his shop at the age of about 87.
    I'm very proud that i own a 60's Henry Burton, built by Henry himself, and a 70's Brian Rourke. i'm still after a nice Swinnerton built by Roy.
    As you say, steel is really making a comeback, as people realise, you generally get a much nicer ride on a steel frame.
    Mike

  14. #39
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    My goodness it’s all coming back to me. When I was a kid I would frequent the Clive Stuart Shop at Catford where Ken was the manager and I would spend hours in there. I remember Ken had a Cheshire Cat Grin, a Campagnolo fetish and was an expert whistler. I too remember the tea made with condensed milk, but I actually quite liked it.
    When the Clive Suart set up went Bust, Ken set up with his Brother Alec at the Welling shop and I got a job there around 1971. I don’t recall how long I worked there, but it was probably less than a year. As previously mentioned the brothers were always arguing and I recall one incident when I was convinced that Ken was going to kill Alec. Alec was a bit bigger than Ken, so he was able to fend him off without too much trouble. I lived at Bromley at the time and would ride to Welling, always trying to latch on to the slipstream of a truck going up the Rochester Way. Despite their sibling rivalry, I got on with both of them very well indeed. They both treated me as an adult. Often when the weather was particularly bad, one or the other would give me a lift home at the end of the day, Ken in his Ford Zodiac with the Tour de France air horns, or Alec in his brand new Mexico Escort, which when he wasn’t driving it he would be paying one of us lads to clean it. I do recall that he would want whoever was cleaning it, to pay particular attention to the engine bay.
    Occasionally at the Welling shop a top rider would call in for a cup of tea and a chat. All of those guys would treat me as an equal, which was a real thrill to a kid who read about them every week in Cycling Weekly. There was only one exception to this rule. Mentioning no names, he was a good time trialist who I seem to remember drove a Morris Marina, or was it a Hillman Avenger and treated me with utter contempt, but as I said, he was the exception.
    After they went their separate ways, I don't know why, but I seem to remember that I stayed more loyal to Alec, Ken was the more successful in business, but I do remember that Alec could also build a mean set of wheels and I also witnessed him building frames in the workshop behind the Welling shop. Alec was a thoroughly nice chap and was always up for a deal, I remember that I once swapped a Hi Fi for a track bike that he had hanging up in the shop. In retrospect I think he got the better end of the deal. I last saw Ken when I dropped in at the Green St Green shop some years ago and he hadn’t changed. He was still giving advice to yet another young rider, drinking tea made with condensed milk and I reckon that he could have given Roger Whitaker a run for his money in the whistling stakes. He was a good chap who really knew his stuff, especially if it was Campagnolo related.
    Jon.
    Last edited by Jboyrc; 09-21-10 at 09:18 AM. Reason: bad grammer

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    Hello everyone,

    It is very satisfying to read so many shared memories of what was a Golden Age of South London cycling. If nothing else it proves that we have not quite lost our marbles - yet.

    I know exactly who the dark blue Morris Marina driving time-trialist is. He was very fussy about the preperation of not only his race bikes but training machine also, I clearly remember cleaning the underside of Blumel popular mudguards. I happened to get on with him pretty well but he did have a reputation for being awkward, and from what I hear from friends in the Woolwich club remains so to this day.

    As Jon says there always seemed to be high profile riders popping into, certainly the Welling shop, though quite what they thought of Ken's vile tasting tea is anyones guess. Hugh Porter and Sid Barras came in a couple of times when they were teamates of Reg Smith, who was a local, at Mercian Bantel. I remember Alec rebuilding their wheels, I know that because I polished the blooming spokes!. Another interesting character was Jan LeGrand who was mechanic to Peter Post and a host of other Six-Day riders, he would come in whenever he was in the country, usually with a very sparkly track bike or two.

    Alec loved those two Escort Mexicos, the second one was wrecked when a wall fell on it at the rear of the shop. There was certainly a heated exchange with the insurance company, but this is Alec Bird we are talking about. Ken had a white (predictable) VW camper for a while, shortly after the Zodiac I think, but it didn't really suit his image. It was replaced by the then new Ford Grenada estate, but this was at Green St Green at his own shop. The rows leading up to the split were absolutely monumental, particularly over the division of stock. Very difficult serving a customer when there is an almighty rumpus going on. Happily like Jon I remained friends with both, Alec was and is more fun though.

    Must remember to talk about bikes more next post. By the way Jon, did you drive a delivery van for Mr Buckwheat in Bromley, just a guess.

    Cheers.

    VA
    Last edited by veloandy; 09-23-10 at 01:44 AM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloandy View Post

    Must remember to talk about bikes more next post. By the way Jon, did you drive a delivery van for Mr Buckwheat in Bromley, just a guess.

    Cheers.

    VA
    Well done Veloandy, I did drive the Buckwheat Special, or are you really Hercule Poirot?

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    Hi Jon,

    I do have a very fine moustache and the little grey cells are still working. I seem to remember going on one of your delivery rounds with you on an afternoon when the shop was closed - probably a Wednesday. I think you also had a radio-controlled plane at the time.

    We certainly had some fun, that much I do know. Just going to put my sleuthing head on.

    VA

  18. #43
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    Good grief Andy, I think I remember you, but you certainly have the advantage over me with your remarkable memory. I did manage to crash the Buckwheat Special with monotonous regularity, I do hope I didn't crash the van when you came out. I still fly RC planes and remember giving Alec a flying dispaly with a helicopter out the back of the shop one day. When you next see Alec, give him my regards. The last time I saw him was at the Skol Six!

    Regards
    Jon Young

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    More Bikes and Ranting

    Hello Everyone,

    Towards the end of 1976 I sketched out an idea for a new special commuting bike. The all Campag Bird Brothers bike was really too good for bashing through London and I wanted something a little different. I had been given a Sturmey Archer fixed two speed hub dating from the early fifties, which I took apart and serviced; not to be recommended to anyone of a nervous disposition!. Alec had pretty well ceased framebuiding so I commissioned Ken's builder, whose name escapes me to give it a crack. I wanted as light a frame as possible, 653 had appeared by then, road geometry but with track ends and spacing for the SA hub. Cue raised eyebrows from Ken, plus I wanted it sprayed black, more raised eyebrows and it had to have clearance for mudguards; almost the final straw. When I explained the whole idea though he got quite enthused, that was his way. The end result was a truly excellent machine.
    Cinelli bars and stem, Campag brakes, headset, seatpost and Pista chainset and pedals, Brooks Proffessional saddle and the then new Esge mudguards, plus the usual Christophe toe clips and straps. The wheels were rather an interesting combination also; The front was a Campag Record small flange on Super Champion and the SA on the same rim, shod with Barum PBW's a terrific tub. For the Winter I experimented with a SA dynohub also built into a sprint rim with reasonable success. Ken I think was as pleased with the project as I was, he certainly had the Cheshire cat grin when he tried it up the road at Green St Green, he used to ask me to bring it over to the shop sometimes so people could see it and a few variations on a theme appeared, but without the fixed hub.
    I rode many miles on that bike, until a crash in Lewisham one Winter evening put it in it's grave. There was a Mk11 built up using a Condor track frame but that proved just a bit too twitchy for long rides.

    The famous record breaking Ken Bird tandem was built about the same time as mine; two very interesting machines in the space of a year out of a small shop in Kent - you simply would not see that from most bicycle shops now. I am afraid if it isn't delivered in a box almost ready to go the chances are one is going to have to hunt around. There were a dozen or so shops dotted around South London into Kent who would build anything in those days so it is not even that Clive Stuart and the permutations of the brothers Bird were unique.

    If you have a history in cycling it is deeply frustrating working in a modern bike shop. There is hardly any chance to experiment and bikes become units to be shifted. The build quality is truly apalling, even on very expensive frames. Over complicated design paired with manufacturing to a price is a very bad combination. It is pleasing therefore to see a cycling sub-group appear who appreciate good quality traditional track and road bikes, it may all be a bit trendy for some people but I support it wholeheartedly. It also means old codgers like me can find a woolen jersey again without having to scour the planet.

    On an end note I have recently bought a new SA fixed hub which I will be building into a bike very soon, can't wait!.

    VA

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    Hi Jon,

    I was the long haired one with a roll up, happy to say I still have some hair, am ashamed to say I still have the roll up also. Mind you Bert Strong used to puff away and posted some pretty good times.

    We had a crash free drive around Sevenoaks I seem to remember. Your helicopter must have made an impression because Alec got bitten by the RC bug. One of his projects was making bait boats for Carp anglers and I think he was helping someone build a large scale bomber powered by four lawn mower engines, sounds like the sort of thing he would enjoy.

    Barry O'Leary sometimes takes him to bike jumbles, the last one was Knockholt earlier in the year. He was on great form, he said he wished us young lads had taken the shop on so he could concentrate on frame-building and seeing ladies!.
    If I knew what I know now I would have, that Welling site like Ken's at G St G was excellent.

    I trained to be a silversmith shortly after leaving Alec and built a couple of frames myself. I am thinking of having a go again, just for the fun of it. I really miss the Skol Six's, they were terrific, all that smoke and boozing!.

    Regards

    Andy

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    Hi Jon,

    I was the long haired one with a roll up, happy to say I still have some hair, am ashamed to say I still have the roll up also. Mind you Bert Strong used to puff away and posted some pretty good times.

    We had a crash free drive around Sevenoaks I seem to remember. Your helicopter must have made an impression because Alec got bitten by the RC bug. One of his projects was making bait boats for Carp anglers and I think he was helping someone build a large scale bomber powered by four lawn mower engines, sounds like the sort of thing he would enjoy.

    Barry O'Leary sometimes takes him to bike jumbles, the last one was Knockholt earlier in the year. He was on great form, he said he wished us young lads had taken the shop on so he could concentrate on frame-building and seeing ladies!.
    If I knew what I know now I would have, that Welling site like Ken's at G St G was excellent.

    I trained to be a silversmith shortly after leaving Alec and built a couple of frames myself. I am thinking of having a go again, just for the fun of it. I really miss the Skol Six's, they were terrific, all that smoke and boozing!.

    Regards

    Andy

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    ooops, a double posting. Sorry folks, the moral of the story, never write on a forum with a Jack Russell sitting on ones lap.

    VA

  23. #48
    Junior Member Bristol Brigand's Avatar
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    Hi, I'm new to the forum and I think I have something useful to add to this thread.
    I bought a CS frame late 1968 from Overburys in Bristol - it was flam red, with a frame number 051 stamped under the bottom bracket - I still have it! It has been refurbished once by Argos cycles and is a firm friend now despite being pensioned off in favour of an Orbea compact.
    I rode the CS frame in several top flight events including the 1969 Scottish Milk Race (South of England team with Paul Newbury, John Varley and 2 guys from the home counties) when Geoff Wiles was riding for the England team.
    I was offered a frame (foc) by Brian Rourke but it was at the time when the business was starting to go down the pan so nothing came of it. I continued to ride the CS as my race bike up until 1977 and then as a summer bike right up until 2009!

    Attachment 176006

    One piece of info that is not in the thread is that CS had a shop in Bedmisnster, Bristol for a year or so before the whole business failed.
    Good memories!
    Last edited by Bristol Brigand; 10-31-10 at 01:14 AM. Reason: picture

  24. #49
    Senior Member auchencrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Brigand View Post
    Hi, I'm new to the forum and I think I have something useful to add to this thread.
    I bought a CS frame late 1968 from Overburys in Bristol - it was flam red, with a frame number 051 stamped under the bottom bracket - I still have it! It has been refurbished once by Argos cycles and is a firm friend now despite being pensioned off in favour of an Orbea compact.
    I rode the CS frame in several top flight events including the 1969 Scottish Milk Race (South of England team with Paul Newbury, John Varley and 2 guys from the home counties) when Geoff Wiles was riding for the England team.
    I was offered a frame (foc) by Brian Rourke but it was at the time when the business was starting to go down the pan so nothing came of it. I continued to ride the CS as my race bike up until 1977 and then as a summer bike right up until 2009!
    Attachment 176006
    One piece of info that is not in the thread is that CS had a shop in Bedmisnster, Bristol for a year or so.
    Good memories!
    Welcome to C&V, Bristol B-
    We have a rule though around here that applies to newbies and vets alike:
    "It didn't happen without pictures"
    - So please post a pic of your bike - (It might be worth retelling the story WITH pics in a new thread - People tend to ignore old dated threads)

    Be sure to take the drive side, some good shots of the components for those of us who are not so intimate with a CS as well as the woefully ignorant ones such as yours truly.
    It's best to show pics that you host remotely on Flicker or Photobucket or one of those. (All you need to do then is select the link to the image that begins and ends with "[img]" , and paste it into your note.)

    PS. does Overby's still exist ? If so how does it look today?
    - Auchen

  25. #50
    Junior Member Bristol Brigand's Avatar
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    Auchan,

    The pic is there (taken in 1969) - follow the link. I think I need to post pictures in 'advanced' mode rather than Quick - sorry.

    Yes Overbury's is till there run by the Powell family. Mrs Powell is still in the shop with Andy doing most of the business. Arthur (the proprietor after his father circ 1900) died in the early 80's I think. The shop is still organised chaos as it was in Arthurs time!

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