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  1. #1
    N_C
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    Expanding my cycling hobby.

    I partially consider cycling to be a hobby for me as well as many other things.

    I have decided to expand upon it recently.

    I'm going to start collecting and restoring old bikes. 1970's and older ballon tire, cruiser style bicycles to be exact.

    I've done a lot of research on it, bought a book, used the internet, etc. This weekend I plan on purchasing the first bike I'm going to restore. It is a Schwinn, don't know what model yet. The guy will sell it to me for $25.00.

    Anyone else collect and restore old bikes?

    Any advice any one has is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Every lane is a bike lane Chris L's Avatar
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    I think there are a few here.
    "I am never going to flirt with idleness again" - Roy Keane
    "We invite everyone to question the entire culture we take for granted." - Manic Street Preachers.
    My blog.
    My bike tours. Japan tour page under construction.

  3. #3
    ÖöÖöÖöÖöÖö Dannihilator's Avatar
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    It is alot of work, and extremely expensive to fully restore an old bike to near perfect condition.
    Strike like an eagle and sacrifice the dove.
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  4. #4
    N_C
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    Originally posted by danka24
    It is alot of work, and extremely expensive to fully restore an old bike to near perfect condition.
    Near perfect are the key words there Dan. As fas it being a lot of work, I don't mind. Where the expense is concerned, well I'll just play it by ear. I'm going to be very selective with the bike I purchase to restore.

    If they require a lot of paint and body work, I'll play it by ear and may not even purchase one that needs a lot of finish work done to it.

    When it comes to the mechanical restoration, the drive train, brakes, etc I do not expect that to be that expensive.

    If I am working on bike and it needs say a replacment chain guard. Well I'll resotre it as much as I can and when I'm able to purchase the chain guard.

    Replacment parts such as saddles, handlebars, chains, etc usually do not cost that much. Or so I've read. But things like tanks, racks, head lights, tail lights, chain and skirt guards can be pretty costly. What I may end up doing there is looking for a bike or 2 to use only for parts.

    I can't wait to start on my first one. If none of you mind I'd like to post pics of it as I make progress on it.

    Wish me luck.

  5. #5
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    FWIW, you can buy old Schwinns for $10 or less any day. That old Schwinn would have to be pretty nearly perfect to be worth spending $25 on it...
    Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!

  6. #6
    ÖöÖöÖöÖöÖö Dannihilator's Avatar
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    I'm currently working on 2 schwinn Sting Rays(1 crate) 1 Schwinn Breeze.

    They're complete resto projects. John, need advice, let me know.
    Strike like an eagle and sacrifice the dove.
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  7. #7
    N_C
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    Dan what year are the sting rays? And what style of krate bike is the one? Do they require paint and body work as part of the restoration? If they do how are you dealing with it? Paint and body shop? Or do you have access to the propr equipment yourself?

    i'm asking because I need some ideas on how to handlde that part of a restoration myself. For now I'll "shy" away from bikes that need a lot of paint and body work. Or if I do begin a restporation on one that does that part of it will have to wait.

  8. #8
    ÖöÖöÖöÖöÖö Dannihilator's Avatar
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    The non crate is a 65, the krate is a 68. The crate needs alot of work done to it, a new fork, new wheels/tires, and the saddle needs to be refurbished. I have the tools and the know how to repair it. The fork and the saddle are easy. The hard part with it will be finding replacement wheels and tires, since they are oddballs. Rebuilding the hubs you will need a diagram of how they go together. When I did the rear hub on my breeze it was a coaster brake, a trip to the lbs or to the library will be a definate in order to get the diagram of that particular coaster brake model. You can get new coaster brake hubs, but if you want a full restoration, rebuild the hubs you have; it will give a better sense of satisfaction when the job is finished. The person who had the breeze before I got it did some very stupid stuff to it. One thing they did was that the hub was rebuilt without using the diagram. There are two half bushings in there that act as part of the locking mechanism, they were put back in when that person had it backwards, another thing that person did was pack the hubs with heavy weight grease, a big don't, use a lighter weight grease, but not white lithium grease though when repacking coaster brake hubs. Another thing this person did was put mismatching wheels on it, and he painted over the chrome wheels with silver spray paint when the rims showed a few specs of rust, which could have been sanded and then buffed over. So basically take your time, just like with restoring a vintage car, restoring an old bike is an act of love. The smallest details will send you on a loop.
    Strike like an eagle and sacrifice the dove.
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