Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,274
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    just starting to mess around with an old bike

    I have an old Nishiki International that I am interested in getting back on the road. It was stored well, but had seen a lot of use. A couple of quick visits to some bike shops did not result in finding anyone who was interested in helping me with it.

    I suspect I need at least the following:

    -tires 27x1 1/8.
    -spokes appear to be fatigued. Does one replace all spokes, or simply buy new wheels?
    -cassette and chain are heavily worn.

    Are parts available? New? Used? Can I just put 700 wheels on it and adjust the brake calipers?

    thanks,

    j

  2. #2
    Senior Member sykerocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Montpelier, VA
    My Bikes
    The keepers: 1960 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 2 - 1988 Rossins
    Posts
    3,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK, to take you your question in order:

    1. Tyres. 27" wheel tyres are readily available, anything from 1" through the classic 1-1/4" sizes. If nowhere else, the local Performance Bike shop always seems to have a half decent selection in stock. 700c wheels are no particular advantage for general use, unless you're in an area where 27" tyres aren't readily available.

    2. Wheel condition. I'm going to assume that your appraisal of spoke fatigue is entirely visual, in that they don't look new, but there's no broken spokes. If this were my bike, I'd put on a new set of tyres and tubes, and then go take it on a 5-10 mile ride. Keep it gentle, no extreme downhill screamers, etc. Then check your wheels mechanical condition. Odds are, they'll still be fine. If so, just clean the up - chrome polish will clean spokes up nicely. If a spoke or two does snap, replace them, then try the gentle test ride again - if you have more spokes snapping you've got a problem, although I'll bet this doesn't happen.

    3. Chain and cassette. I always replace the chain when I get another old bike. 6-speed (that's what they're called nowdays) chains usually don't cost more than $10.00. As to cassette, I have a feeling what you've got is a freewheel, not a cassette. They're easily available on eBay. Go for a Shimano as they're easily available, the quality is always good, and the removal tool is the easiest to get. Park makes a good one. As you've got a Japanese bike, the freewheel is industry-standard English thread.

    Just the same, for that first gentle test ride, spray some lubricant on the old chain and into the freewheel body. As long as the latter clicks and freewheels properly, you're probably not going to have to replace it unless the teeth are really worn - and I'm talking physically worn down, not just a coating of surface rust.

    When I got my Raleigh Gran Sport last year at the motorcycle show, I rode it that day to get around the show - it was my reason for buying it in the first place. $4.00 sure beat walking. There was corrosion on the cable guides, so it wouldn't shift well, and cosmetically it was what is called in the motorcycle world a rolling basket case, but I put it in third gear and it got me around the site for the entire day, by which time I'd figured out just what I'd needed to do to get it into good condition. And that included the original tyres (cracked gumwalls) and tubes (they held air).

    Never underestimate what an old beater bicycle is capable of. Just the same, make sure that first ride is gentle and at low speed, so you don't get yourself in over your head.

    Syke
    Deranged Few M/C

  3. #3
    Senior Member sykerocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Montpelier, VA
    My Bikes
    The keepers: 1960 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 2 - 1988 Rossins
    Posts
    3,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Second try on this - not sure if the first got through. OK I'll take your questions in order:

    1. Tyres. 27" tyres are still readily available. In my area, the local Performance Bike shop has a good selection. Assuming you can get tyers and tubes, there no real advantage to building up or buying 700c wheels, unless you're going to go to sew-ups. Which I heartily recommend, although they are a lot more demanding, so I'd really recommend you pass on this option until the bike is back on the road and running fine for awhile.

    2. Fatigued spokes. Are we talking snapped spokes, or just dirty and corroded looking? My strongest recommendation is to first pump up the current tyres and see if they hold air. If they do, go do a VERY gentle 1-2 mile ride on what you've got (no screaming downhills, fast breakaways, etc. - make sure if something does quit on you you can bring the bike to a stop without losing your balance). Come back and check the wheels. If you don't have any snapped spokes, replace the tyres and tubes then repeat, only do about 5-10 miles.

    If you haven't snapped a spoke by this point, just take some chrome polish and clean them up. If one or two have snapped, replace and repeat the test ride. If you still have spokes snapping, you've got a problem. I have a feeling you won't.

    3. Cassette and chain wear. First off, unless you've got a 7-speed or larger rear, I have a feelilng you've got a freewheel, not a cassette. Before that first 1-2 mile ride, spray some lubricant down the body and over the current chain. If the freewheel is still clicking and freewheeling properly, you're probaby going to be able to use it, unless there's SERIOUS wear on the cog teeth, and I mean misshapen cogs, not just surface rust on them. If you need to replace it, go Shimano. They're readily available, very good quality, and the Park tool to remove them is available at any bike shop.

    Once I've gone through the initial test ride(s), I normally replace the tyres, tubes and chain on any new old bike that comes into my hands, just as a matter of course - said expense is automatically figured in with the purchase price and negotiations. 6-speed chains usually seem to run around $10.00.

    To keep things in perspective, I picked up my 64 Raleigh Gran Sport at a vintage motorcycle show last fall, just for transportation around the site that day (the $4.00 expense sure beat walking). The shift cables were corroded, so I jammed it into third gear and used it for the day, by which end I had figured out what I needed to do with it, and in motorcycle terms this bike was a rolling basket case. Just the same, I got around maybe 5-6 miles that day on the original tyres (cracked sidewalls) and tubes (they held air) just fine, although under no conditions did I go near the street.

    Never underestimate an old beater bike. They're usually in better condition than they look. And what you're describing sounds in better shape than the Raleigh I picked up.

    Syke
    Deranged Few M/C

  4. #4
    Chrome Freak Rabid Koala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    1971 Chrome Paramount P-13, 1973 Gitane Tour de France, 1974 Raleigh Professional
    Posts
    3,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your International is from the early seventies, you have a very nice riding bike. Not the top of the line to be sure, but a nicely equipped better than entry level bike.

    I had one back in the day. It used Araya rims which were pretty damage prone, possibly due to the fact that I was 15 when I bought the thing. It has Suntour VGT derailleurs and Suntour Power stem shifters. It never missed a shift. I agree with Skyewalker's advice. Try it out and get comfortable with it. Don't rush into spending any money you don't need to.

    I went from a late sixties vintage Raleigh Grand Prix with Simplex Prestige to the Nishiki. I had no idea a bike could shift so well. Who knew???
    1971 Paramount P-13 Chrome
    1973 Paramount P-15 Opaque Blue
    1973 Gitane Tour De France
    1974 Raleigh Professional
    1991 Waterford Paramount
    Litespeed Tuscany
    Holland Titanium

  5. #5
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,274
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    thanks for the help

    Very thoughtful and complete help, many thanks.

    One response about the spokes (and whether they are fatigued): I took it out for a ten mile ride or so, and at the very end I started hearing an odd noise. At home, I found a spoke that had broken right at the hub end. While looking at the rest of them, another broke in my hands under fairly gentle pressure. Everything on this bike indicates very extensive use, and so that, along with its age led me to question the wheels altogether. Since I checked in this morning, I have poked around some more locally to see what might be done, and I figure I can either find a decent set of used wheels, or else pay up for a new set. I will do one or the other. The LBS does not seem overly eager to respoke what I have.

    Already, I have found a decent used rear, with a better looking freewheel even. Might kill two birds with one stone with that find. I bought a basket of various parts from a guy here I found on-line. The bad (or good?) news is that these nuggets of gold were part of a package purchase that also included a really sweet old Trek. A month ago, I had one bike that I hated. I find that I now have about four, including these two that have me thinking dangerously expensive thoughts Me thinks I have a small problem developing.

    The Nishiki is a good ride. I am tall, and the the geometry of this bike felt really good for me. So even if it is kind of silly to sink money into it, I will anyway. I have only ridden the Trek around the block, so I really do not know if it feels as good for me. Both are large frames, and look similar from the side. But the Nishiki felt right. It has cooler paint also.

    thanks again, j

  6. #6
    Chrome Freak Rabid Koala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    1971 Chrome Paramount P-13, 1973 Gitane Tour de France, 1974 Raleigh Professional
    Posts
    3,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A month ago, I had one bike that I hated. I find that I now have about four, including these two that have me thinking dangerously expensive thoughts Me thinks I have a small problem developing.
    You better seek help now before it is too late. Most of us here are way beyond any help. This habit does not get cheaper with age.

    I started with a $50 used mountain bike. I don't even want to guess at how much $$$ I have spent since then.
    1971 Paramount P-13 Chrome
    1973 Paramount P-15 Opaque Blue
    1973 Gitane Tour De France
    1974 Raleigh Professional
    1991 Waterford Paramount
    Litespeed Tuscany
    Holland Titanium

  7. #7
    PTB
    PTB is offline
    Winter=getting fatter
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jgedwa
    The bad (or good?) news is that these nuggets of gold were part of a package purchase that also included a really sweet old Trek. A month ago, I had one bike that I hated. I find that I now have about four, including these two that have me thinking dangerously expensive thoughts Me thinks I have a small problem developing.
    Holy cow this is addictive. I have the same problem after getting an old Schwinn to replace my stolen mountain bike. This summer alone, I've bought three old bikes, and resold one. I'm using a Schwinn 1983LeTour Luxe as a daily commuter and holding on to a Miyata 710 to try and find something smaller. Been shopping for another Japanese frame--like Nishiki.

    Anyway, point is: I also had a spoke issue (and a flat spot) on the LeTour Luxe's rear wheel and it needed replacing. I found out that REI carries Weinmann 27" replacement rims. They're alloy and QR, but they're also labeled "safety series" so they might not be "performance" quality--I don't know. It was relatively cheap at $40.

    I would suggest, consistent with the other posts here, that the chain and freewheel also be replaced. I can't tell you the huge difference it made on both of my old bikes. Again, I got my 6-speed freewheels from REI, at $12 for a 14-24T and $22 for a 14-34T. Good luck with your fix-up and let us know when you're getting rid of that Trek!

  8. #8
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,274
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    freewheel

    So, while we are talking freewheels, here is where I stand. I have no idea what kind of ratios I want, and only have the dimmest idea of what ones will work on what bikes. In the pile of stuff I bought the other day, I picked out about a dozen of them. I did not really know what I was looking for; I tried to only get ones that looked unworn, and that were about the same size as what I have on it now. Since I am still just messing around, I am not too worried about maximizing performance. That will come as I figure things out. But even as a starting point, what should I look for?

    And about my new pychosis: I predict that I have two more frames by the end of the year and that I am rooting through piles of things at swap meets within a month.

    "No honey, that is not new. I have had that bike since high school, I just recently brought it out of the garage."

    j

  9. #9
    PTB
    PTB is offline
    Winter=getting fatter
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jgedwa
    But even as a starting point, what should I look for?
    In my limited noob experience:

    Hard to say what to look for, but easier to note what you should obviously avoid: rusty or worn freewheels, or any weird noises other than smooth clicks from the pawls. Freewheels were meant to be replaced, not serviced (thank you, Sheldon Brown!).

    It is diffiuclt to visually inspect for wear. I have replaced two freewheels because they were skipping, and neither appeared to be worn by looking at them--they only skipped under heavy acceleration/climbing. Also note that as the freewheel wears, the chain wears with it. You might take out a perfectly smooth-running drive train and think the freewheel seems fine, but if you put a brand-new chain on it, the cogs might start skipping! The old chain was better matched to the wear on the freewheel.

    Also, look for "upgraded" freewheel cogs. For example, shimano freewheel teeth that appear to be a little twisted (instead of flat with the plane of the cog) are called "Uniglide" and were supposed to work better. See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_u-v.html#uniglide

    But this was some old-school stuff compared to Hyperglide. Seriously, for the $15-20 that you can spend on a new hyperglide freewheel, I strongly recommend it (if you will be deciding on a "favorite" bike for regular use). It is TOTALLY worth it. My bike shifts unbelievably faster and smoother.

  10. #10
    Novist senior member tolfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Amish Country
    My Bikes
    have about 30 bikes right now
    Posts
    1,514
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "No honey, that is not new. I have had that bike since high school, I just recently brought it out of the garage."

    j[/QUOTE]
    GIRLFRIEND QUESTION: WHY DID YOU HAVE TO BUY 2 BIKES
    ANSWER: SO WE CAN RIDE TOGETHER HUN

  11. #11
    Senior Member peripatetic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    All 70s and 80s, only steel.
    Posts
    2,124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tolfan
    "No honey, that is not new. I have had that bike since high school, I just recently brought it out of the garage."

    j
    GIRLFRIEND QUESTION: WHY DID YOU HAVE TO BUY 2 BIKES
    ANSWER: SO WE CAN RIDE TOGETHER HUN[/QUOTE]


    REAL girlfriend question: What are you going to do with 12 bikes?

    Answer, uh, um...

    OP; if you're interested in a pair of 27" wheels with a Shimano freehub that takes cassettes, PM me. I'm looking to unload stuff right now, and no one seems that interested in my parts. NYC ain't far.

  12. #12
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,274
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    stage two illness

    things are starting to fall into place now: going to a swap meet in Allentown PA in early Aug to load up on stuff.

    Even managed to talk my girlfriend into taking her (larger) car. She thinks it is cute that I have found a new obsession. I have no idea how I presented this to her, but based on the results, I am a genius. Well, maybe she is just very forgiving.

    I am going to take the earlier poster's advice to just make things simple and buy a new freewheel. Seems to be foolish not to. Which brings me to another question: how hard is it going to be to get the old one off? I do not have the right tool, but will get that on Wed. It seems to me that all those miles of cranking will have pretty much put an atomic bond between the two parts. If I dose it with pentrating oil and let it sit, can I get it off without mangling the wheel?

    Okay, one last question: I have noticed that all the cool bikes do not have that pressed steel or plastic disk behind the freewheel. Can I just leave mine off also? And will I magically become cool?

    j

  13. #13
    Senior Member sykerocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Montpelier, VA
    My Bikes
    The keepers: 1960 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 2 - 1988 Rossins
    Posts
    3,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Freewheel removal is real simple:

    Removing a splined freewheel (Shimano):

    1. Remove quick release
    2. Place freewheel removing tool in a vice, splines side up, and clamp down tightly
    3. Drop wheel on tool, freewheel side down, and make sure that the splines nestle in the freewheel
    4. Grab wheel rim and turn counterclockwise. Use as much force as is necessary. 27" wheels give good leverage.
    5. Once broken free, just spin the wheel until the freewheel is completely unscrewed. Lift wheel and take freewheel.

    Now, as I don't remember you saying you have a Shimano freewheel, if you've got a SunTour that uses a tool with dual points sticking up, the technique is the same, except that the points on the tool must go into the slots, and then rescrew the quick release back on the hub to hold the tool in place. Then clamp the tool in the vice and proceed as above. You might have to remove a freewheel side axle spacer to get it to clamp down tightly.

    Penetrating oil won't be necessary. I'm 5' 10" and weigh about 175. Even 35 years ago, when I was about 40 pounds lighter and a lot weaker, I never had trouble removing a freewheel with the above method.

    Syke
    Deranged Few M/C

  14. #14
    Senior Member sykerocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Montpelier, VA
    My Bikes
    The keepers: 1960 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 2 - 1988 Rossins
    Posts
    3,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by peripatetic
    GIRLFRIEND QUESTION: WHY DID YOU HAVE TO BUY 2 BIKES
    ANSWER: SO WE CAN RIDE TOGETHER HUN

    REAL girlfriend question: What are you going to do with 12 bikes?

    Answer, uh, um...

    OP; if you're interested in a pair of 27" wheels with a Shimano freehub that takes cassettes, PM me. I'm looking to unload stuff right now, and no one seems that interested in my parts. NYC ain't far.[/QUOTE]

    Proper answer to both aforementioned questions:

    1. Because I felt like it
    2. Get them ready to ride, and then start looking for more.

    My wife's used to up to 10 motorcycles in the garage, 1%ers crashing at our house, and occasional visits from the police. She's not going to worry about more than four (my current number) bicycles.

    Syke
    Deranged Few M/C

  15. #15
    Senior Member sykerocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Montpelier, VA
    My Bikes
    The keepers: 1960 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 2 - 1988 Rossins
    Posts
    3,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jgedwa
    Okay, one last question: I have noticed that all the cool bikes do not have that pressed steel or plastic disk behind the freewheel. Can I just leave mine off also? And will I magically become cool?

    j
    If you're rear derailleur is adjusted correctly, the bike will definitely look better. If it's not adjusted correctly, the chain can lodge behind the freewheel and lock up the rear wheel. Which means you're going down. Hard. An excellent way to break a wrist - like I did four weeks ago.

    Which is why I've had all this time to submit all these posts.

    Syke
    Deranged Few M/C

  16. #16
    PTB
    PTB is offline
    Winter=getting fatter
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sykerocker
    If you're rear derailleur is adjusted correctly, the bike will definitely look better. If it's not adjusted correctly, the chain can lodge behind the freewheel and lock up the rear wheel. Which means you're going down. Hard. An excellent way to break a wrist - like I did four weeks ago.
    Oh crap! And I thought I was one of the cool kids because I took the guard off! Well, kids, as Officer Friendly says, "Safety is Cool!" Guess you gotta trust that advice.

    Or wait--I live in a relatively flat state, so I never go down that far on the freewheel anyway. And if I do, I'll be chugging uphill very slowly. Think its still necessary?

    Oh, and on the freewheel--you asked about gear ratios and stuff. Most standard freewheels are something like 14-24, meaning the smallest cog is 14 and the biggest is 24. That's probably good enough for most road bikes. But there are freewheels out there that have even smaller cogs for super high speed. I also have a 14-34, where the first 5 gears are "normal" and the 6th, largest gear, is a huge step up. This would be good for a touring bike or if you live somewhere where there's a lot of hills. Point is you can't really mess it up, and you'll be fine going with what you can find (freewheels are relatively obsolete, so LBS/REI are not likely to have a wide selection).

  17. #17
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,274
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    thanks for all the help

    I have everything stripped down and ready to go, but have to cool my heals because the bike place is not open till tomorrow. I am a freewheel and a wrench away from that thing being on the road again.

    In the meantime, I have put new rubber on the Trek I found. I still like the feel of the Nishiki better, but it is a nice bike. Maybe it will be my more performance oriented bike, and the Nishiki will be my bomber.


    many thanks everyone for the advice,

    j

  18. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Igedwa,

    I don't how you managed to get this kind of response but you are one lucky dude. Do you have little bells on your shoes or something.

  19. #19
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    7,254
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good luck on your addiction. Last year I got rid of an old Schwinn Suburban because I didn't need more than three bikes... Now I am trying to thin my herd because I don't need 10 bikes... I should be down to 7 shortly. Next year, I expect to thin my herd because I don't need 15 bikes... My most expensive was my first ($350, new) and my most expensive since then was about $115... But it is all the little stuff I buy for them that is adding up.

    I have at least three project bikes for the winter, plus a full time job, plus two classes at a time at the university... Then of course the hours of searching for another bike... just in case one shows up that I can't do without.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    50
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I just got the look of death from the wife when I brought home number seven a few weeks ago. She doesn't seem to understand why I need so many. Actually, it's a perfect number, one good road bike, one vintage road bike, one tandem, one mountain bike, one hybrid, one vintage schwin balloon tire bike and a second vintage road project bike. All I need is a track bike and I've got about one of everything.

    Brian

  21. #21
    Chrome Freak Rabid Koala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    1971 Chrome Paramount P-13, 1973 Gitane Tour de France, 1974 Raleigh Professional
    Posts
    3,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My wife once questioned why I need so many bikes. I replied that playing with these bikes is FAR cheaper than restoring a car, with the added benefit of getting exercise. I bought one for her, she rides with me once in a while, and has quit bugging me about the habit.
    1971 Paramount P-13 Chrome
    1973 Paramount P-15 Opaque Blue
    1973 Gitane Tour De France
    1974 Raleigh Professional
    1991 Waterford Paramount
    Litespeed Tuscany
    Holland Titanium

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NW Ohio
    My Bikes
    1984 Miyata 310, 1989 Club Fuji, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem
    Posts
    1,168
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Anderson
    Well, I just got the look of death from the wife when I brought home number seven a few weeks ago. She doesn't seem to understand why I need so many. Actually, it's a perfect number, one good road bike, one vintage road bike, one tandem, one mountain bike, one hybrid, one vintage schwin balloon tire bike and a second vintage road project bike. All I need is a track bike and I've got about one of everything.

    Brian
    Don't forget a Folder, a Muscle bike (Sting-Ray), and a vintage BMX. And an English 3 speed.

    A couple more ploys:

    "I'm just storing this for (friend's name), he doesn't have room in his apartment."

    Bring the parts in a few at a time. Then say "I just threw this together from some stuff I had laying around."

    Rotate your stock. She will be used to seeing different bikes all the time so she won't know how many you really have. You need to keep some under a tarp for this to work well. When you get something new, just put it under the tarp for a while, then work it into the rotation. If a lot of your bikes are the same color, you can get away with even more.

  23. #23
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    YT
    Posts
    7,553
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My girlfriend's dad brought me 3 bikes last week while I was in the hospital. A low end nishiki road bike, a very old rocky mountain MTB and a department store junker. I have 6 bikes for myself and a seventh on the way Darwin. Two are winter projects and the others are constanly being modified. My girlfriend has three bikes and rides with me sometimes but since meeting me now rides to school every day. Not to mention the others 5 or so "floaters" I have kicking around in various stages of disrpair or waiting for the potential buyers to come up with the cash for that frame i have in my closet. I tell my girlfriend I could be out boozing with the guys but instead I'm at home working on bikes or riding with with our friends. She knows more about bikes now than most people I know.
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •