Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-10-06, 10:32 PM   #1
sixer
amateur
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Charlotte, NC
Bikes:
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
'84 Centurion - More valuable original or modified?

I have an 1984 Centurion LeMans 12 that has basically never been ridden. It's all original with a few additions (mirror, rear rack) - which were added at the time of purchase. It's my size, which is huge (26.5" frame). So, if I were to sell it (I have two other bikes its size already), would I get more money (net) for it selling it as it is, or if I swapped some parts out on it?

When I was thinking about keeping it I was going to lighten it up (drop the kick stand, the chainring guard, the casette guard, the saddle and seat) and update the breaks, bar tape seatpost, saddle, chain and casette. But I'm wondering if its worth my time and $ doing those things if I won't recoup the cost of the new brakes, etc. For the sake of argument, lets assume I'm not putting on the bottom of the line, but the not the top components, either.

The other argument is that I could throw out all the parts and make it a fixed gear/singlespeed, but that would require wheels and more labor and it's currently shifting very well, which makes me want to leave it intact.

Let me know what you think; what you would do; what would make you feel most satisfied (this can include keeping it).

Here's a link to the catalogue:
http://sheldonbrown.com/centurion1984/index.html

And a pic of the bike as it currently is. (only a few very small nicks. no rust except on a few bolts and in those nicks)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg centurion_lemans.jpg (70.8 KB, 60 views)
sixer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-06, 10:37 PM   #2
cuda2k
Unique Vintage Steel
 
cuda2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Allen, TX
Bikes: Kirk Frameworks JKS-C, Serotta Nova, Gazelle AB-Frame, Fuji Team Issue, Schwinn Crosscut, All-City Space Horse
Posts: 11,486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
With that size frame you're not likely to find many interested parties. And thus low demand is going to mean low price. Unless you find that one other guy out there that's 12ft tall looking for a vintage centurion.

Personally, I'd say keep it. Upgrade what needs upgrading to make it operate and run smoothly and safely for you. New bar tape, new brakes (or just brake pads!), tires/tubes, cables, and run it for a while.

That may just give Timcupery's Schwinn a run for its money as the biggest lugged steel frame on the boards!
cuda2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-06, 11:49 PM   #3
hackybiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Philly
Bikes:
Posts: 110
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Unless you already have parts around, I'd say it's not worth it to spend money upgrading it before selling. Just sell it as is.

I think a lot of folks get into a weird "profit" mentality when they decide whether to sell or keep a bike. If you make a living from flipping bikes, that's one thing. But personally, for me, you can't put a price tag on a bike that fits, works well, and serves a need you have.

If you do sell it, sell it because you actually need the space or the money, and not just because it seems like the thing to do with an old bike.
hackybiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-06, 12:05 AM   #4
cyclotoine
Senior Member
 
cyclotoine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Yukon, Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 8,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
SInce it has clamp on cable guides for the derailleurs I say remove the derailleurs and shifters and put em in a box. put some new bar tape on. If you want a fixed gear I say replace the rear axle with a solid one and track nuts and redish as necessary to just put a chain on the freewheel and viola you have a budget singlespeed. As for the crank, just get some pista bolts and take off the big ring and just keep the small ring... If it is a 42 you are laughing. perfect SS or road fixed gearing IMHO.
__________________
1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear
cyclotoine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-06, 05:02 AM   #5
svt4cam
On a mission from God
 
svt4cam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: In a squalor
Bikes: 6? Favorit (under construction), 82 Bianchi Nuovo Racer, 76 Alan, 8? Raleigh Fixie, 75 Atala, 94 Cannondale 2.8, 75 Paramount P13, 94 Cannondale RT1000 tandem, 76 Masi Gran Criterium, 81 Motobecane Grand Touring, 77 Mondia Super, 12 Specialized Crux
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You can get all the fixie components pr of wheels and track cog (watch your chain width true track cogs use wider chain) & lock ring for about 140 to 170 on ebay new. Dump your outer chain ring Flip your bb axle for better chain line if you can and put the inner ring on the outer withh some washers on the old chainring bolts so you can tighten em down. Use around a 15 tooth rear cog if you have some hills around or if really flat use your big ring in front and a 15 rear. I slammed together this $20.00 Raleigh from ebay pieces parts and it's become one of my favorite bikes. Great for technique and strength and when you dust your riding buddies on one it's really imppressive lol.
svt4cam is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:18 PM.