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Old 12-13-06, 02:14 PM   #1
mrdeep
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Raleigh Grand Prix

I don't know much about Classic / Vintage bikes (or bikes at all, really), I was wondering what everyone thought of a Raleigh Grand Prix. I'd be using it primarily for commuting to work, occasional rides for fun, all on the road. Could I put fenders on it if possible?

Specifically, this one:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=260063800447

Any advice would be appreciated, especially things to consider when looking for a Classic bike or uh, links to threads that I should have already read.
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Old 12-13-06, 02:59 PM   #2
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That bike would take fender no problem. You better be at least 6'3" to ride that thing. It will weigh a ton and it is not 40 years old. 30 maybe, but I am leaning to more like 25yrs. 30 bucks it okay but I would look for something local. Watch craig's list and look for bikes with alloy cotterless cranks. You may want to go into some bike shops and get an idea of what size you are looking for first.
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Old 12-13-06, 03:33 PM   #3
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I just got a Grand Prix mixte.
Looks like fenders will be fine.
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Old 12-13-06, 03:39 PM   #4
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That GP is a '74-'76 model; the serial number will tell which. They're good solid bikes that'll stand up to the rigors of commuting easily. No problem fitting fenders; I have a set on my '69. I see someone has already replaced the original Simplex RD with a newer SunTour; I'd replace the FD too if it hasn't been already.
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Old 12-13-06, 04:33 PM   #5
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That would be an excellent commuter for a tall person. btw - they aren't that heavy.
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Old 12-13-06, 05:09 PM   #6
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Well, I'd swap in a pair of lighter weight aluminum alloy wheels before commuting on that bike, especially in the rain.

Neal
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Old 12-13-06, 09:05 PM   #7
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Well, I'd swap in a pair of lighter weight aluminum alloy wheels before commuting on that bike, especially in the rain.

Neal
How much would those run?
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Old 12-13-06, 09:23 PM   #8
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If the bike only needs tires, I'd say it's not a bad deal - I picked-up a very similar GP (same color, also very tall) from the trash during the summer. In addition to tires it needs wheels, a seat, and probably cables, brake pads, and other related small bits. I've got those things in my garage, but if you had to buy them I think you'd be hard pressed to get them all for less than $30.

I had another GP which I traded away last year as it was a bit small for me, but I'd say it's a good ride for commuting and recreational uses.

I'm in central CT and would say that the price is very fair for the area - I watch Craig's List pretty closely, and don't see many bikes of comparable caliber priced any lower than this.
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Old 12-13-06, 09:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nlerner
Well, I'd swap in a pair of lighter weight aluminum alloy wheels before commuting on that bike, especially in the rain.

Neal
Do that and an alloy crankset and you'll have something.
I'm tweaking a Grand Prix a few years older right now, a Gazelle-made one. Put an old SR Apex crankset on it and am scrounging for wheels.
Take a look at these:

http://www.bikepartsusa.com/product_...1&p=01%2D82945
http://www.bikepartsusa.com/product_...1&p=01%2D82947

My local Dick's Sporting Goods will sell the same wheels a couple of bucks cheaper and you don't have to pay freight.
For myself, I'll just wait until something useable comes through the dump
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Old 12-13-06, 09:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by top506
Do that and an alloy crankset and you'll have something.
I'm tweaking a Grand Prix a few years older right now, a Gazelle-made one. Put an old SR Apex crankset on it and am scrounging for wheels.
Take a look at these:

http://www.bikepartsusa.com/product_...1&p=01%2D82945
http://www.bikepartsusa.com/product_...1&p=01%2D82947

My local Dick's Sporting Goods will sell the same wheels a couple of bucks cheaper and you don't have to pay freight.
For myself, I'll just wait until something useable comes through the dump
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Same here, except cheap somewhere.
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Old 12-14-06, 12:59 PM   #11
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I have never regretted fitting a lowly Peugeot UO-8 with aluminum rims and cranks, and the Raleigh Gran Prix is a comparable machine, with the advantage of British/ISO threads and diameters.
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Old 12-14-06, 03:56 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by John E
I have never regretted fitting a lowly Peugeot UO-8 with aluminum rims and cranks, and the Raleigh Gran Prix is a comparable machine, with the advantage of British/ISO threads and diameters.
I currently have both, but was suprised how much lighter the grand prix was.
But it might just be because it's a little smaller, doesn't have a rack, and is a mixte.
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Old 12-15-06, 03:46 AM   #13
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Looks like a 25 inch frame. That's pretty much the upper end of what I can ride, and I'm 6'3, so be sure you're big enough for it.
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Old 12-15-06, 06:09 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdeep
I don't know much about Classic / Vintage bikes (or bikes at all, really), I was wondering what everyone thought of a Raleigh Grand Prix. I'd be using it primarily for commuting to work, occasional rides for fun, all on the road. Could I put fenders on it if possible?

Specifically, this one:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=260063800447

Any advice would be appreciated, especially things to consider when looking for a Classic bike or uh, links to threads that I should have already read.
I rebuilt a Raleigh Super Gran Prix 2 years ago. http://www.accesswave.ca/~elvisbird/tour2.htm
I have done even more work on it since then - water bottle bosses on the seat tube, dropped the rear brake stay, and repainted. But it doesn't look much more differant than the photo.

If you start upgrading you will run into some challenges:
- you'll have to get long reach brakes, if you go with modern dual pivot. Even then you may have to rig a drop bolt. http://sheldonbrown.com/home-drop.html. In the end I just had someone drop down the brake stay for me.
- if you go with more than a 5 speed rear cluster you'll have to get the rear triangle spread. No big deal.
- the horizontal dropouts MAY be a problem - centering your wheel and mounting a rear derailler.
- On mine I had a hellava time finding a headset with a short stack height that would work with the fork steerer tube length. THAT was tough.

If you're looking for wheels, I have a set for sale:
36 spoke, black box rim, Shimano generic hubs, Velox rim cloth. Actually the bike in the photo show the wheels. I'm selling them because I'm upgrading the wheels on my road bike and switching THOSE to this Raleigh.

Do a search on my name (Digger) and Super Grand Prox and you will find a bunch of posts on it.

I doubt that bike shown in the link you provided is 40 years old, I'm thinking maybe 25 to 30.
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Old 12-17-06, 12:20 AM   #15
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Hi all, I just picked up Raleigh Grand Prix for $10. Many of the stickers are scratched up so I couldn't make out out what the tubing material was from the label on the seat tube. Is mixte the tubing material?
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Old 12-17-06, 02:25 AM   #16
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Mixte is a frame style, more commonly known as ladies bikes.
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Old 12-18-06, 04:38 AM   #17
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My girlfriend rode a century on her 69 Grand Prix with steel cranks and alloy rims. It remains her favorite bike. I have one about the same vintage I use for a commuter/general rider that's been converted to fixed gear with a rear rack. Real stable, classy and solid. Weights not an issue, me being around a 250 pounder.
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Old 12-18-06, 07:32 AM   #18
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Mixte is a frame style! not necessarily a womens bike. A womens bike has the top tube curved down into the seat tube. I also went to alloy wheels, aluminum crank set and upright handlebars on my Peugeot mixte. Next comes installing a 32 tooth cog on the heliomatic rear hub!
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Old 12-18-06, 01:59 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by oglala_1927
Mixte is a frame style! not necessarily a womens bike. A womens bike has the top tube curved down into the seat tube. I also went to alloy wheels, aluminum crank set and upright handlebars on my Peugeot mixte. Next comes installing a 32 tooth cog on the heliomatic rear hub!
I was just trying to also put it in layman's terms.
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Old 12-18-06, 02:06 PM   #20
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Ok, I get the mixte thing now, thanks
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