Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36
  1. #1
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I'm excited! '72 Raleigh International

    Through the incredible generosity of a dear old friend and his father, I just received a 1972 Raleigh International. At least I'm pretty sure it's a '72, the serial starts with "G" and it seems to fit with the description of the '72 on the RetroRaleighs site. It's champagne in color, it's in pretty good overall shape (somewhat nicked and scratched, with a little surface rust here and there, but nothing major), and it seems to be mostly original. I promise to post pics later, but for now I do have a few questions. Here's what's on the bike:

    Campy crankset, rear der., front der., downtube shifters, brakes, brake levers, headset, seatpost, pedals, and hubs. The rims are marked "Fiamme Made in Italy" and are tubulars (I've never dealt with tubulars before). Wheels are 36 spoke, front and rear. Handlebars and stem are Cinelli.

    From what I've seen in the catalogs on RetroRaleighs, the stock brakes and rims would have been Weinmanns, with the brakes being centerpulls. I presume the hubs would have been the same Campy Record that I have, but laced to Weinmann rims. Since the Fiamme rims that are on the bike are tubulars, I presume they're 700c? Were the Campy brakes and tubular rims/tires a factory option, or is this something that would have had to have been changed out later? I believe I've read that the upgrade to Campy sidepulls was fairly common on these bikes, I was just wondering if it was such a common upgrade it was made a factory option?

    I've always been a Schwinn sort of guy when it comes to road bikes (and I'm not talking Paramounts ), so this higher end stuff is totally new to me. But I am so excited, and grateful for my friend's and his father's generosity. I want to keep this bike as vintage as possible, but at the same time I want to make it a practical bike to ride for an old mountain biker like me. My main areas of concern are the tubulars and the stock gearing. If I were to re-lace the hubs to different rims, is there anything anyone would recommend for a rim that would be appropriate? If I do this, I'd like to go with 700c clinchers, and something that has a hook edge so I can use high pressures............The bike has apparently had the original freewheel swapped out for a 14 x 31 (five speed). What would the original gearing have been? The Campy chainrings are 52 and 45, which I would think might be original. I really need lower gears all the way around (I'm used to low-geared triples ), but my desire to keep the Campy drivetrain as original as possible will probably over-ride that. Any ideas to get me some lower gears and yet stay with the original cranks and derailleurs? What about that "tripleizer" I've seen on Pastor Bob's Paramount, how does that work?

    Thanks for any input-
    Last edited by well biked; 01-10-07 at 09:56 PM.

  2. #2
    SLJ 6/8/65-5/2/07 Walter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    SE Florida, USA aka the Treasure Coast
    Posts
    5,248
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Going 700C clincher shouldn't be a prob. I'd check eBay for a vintage wheelset as opposed to relacing. Probably cheaper than the new rims/spokes and keeps the orig. wheelset intact.

    You should be ableto get a "Ultra" 6 speed freewheel on there but if your gears are 14X31 I don't know if you can get much lower.

    A 39 tooth small ring front chainwheel might be helpful. You can get Salsa brand ones for reasonable money and keep the Campy markings on the crank arms and big ring. Probably can't get much smaller than 50T on the big ring but a 39X31 "climbing" gear should do the trick.

    Post pics.


    “Life is not one damned thing after another. Life is one damned thing over and over.”
    Edna St. Vincent Millay

  3. #3
    Knows Bigfoot's Momma
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    My Bikes
    yeah; got a couple...
    Posts
    1,544
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Period correct 700c clincher rims are nearly impossible to come by. Typical then (especially on British) was a 27". If you want to go with 700c, I'd suggest the silver color Mavic MA3. They don't look too out of place.

    BTW- congratulations on the International! One of Raleigh's very best, and probably their nicest riding.
    nice lugs baby!

  4. #4
    crotchety young dude el twe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    SF, CA
    My Bikes
    IRO Angus; Casati Gold Line; Redline 925; '72 Schwinn Olympic Paramount
    Posts
    4,819
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe Mavic stopped producing the MA3 and replaced it with the Open Sport. And the Open Pro would be a nice upgrade from that.
    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacKid View Post
    I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
    IRO Angus Casati Gold Line

  5. #5
    Gone, but not forgotten Sheldon Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Newtonville, Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
    Posts
    2,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I just received a 1972 Raleigh International...Here's what's on the bike:

    Campy crankset, rear der., front der., downtube shifters, brakes, brake levers, headset, seatpost, pedals, and hubs. The rims are marked "Fiamme Made in Italy" and are tubulars (I've never dealt with tubulars before). Wheels are 36 spoke, front and rear. Handlebars and stem are Cinelli.

    From what I've seen in the catalogs on RetroRaleighs, the stock brakes and rims would have been Weinmanns, with the brakes being centerpulls.
    Right. The Cinelli bars/stem and Fiamme rims would also be after-the-fact upgrades.

    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I presume the hubs would have been the same Campy Record that I have, but laced to Weinmann rims (presumably 27" rims?)
    Stock rims were crummy AVA tubulars, but it was VERY common for these to be upgraded to 27' clinchers back in the day. (In that era, 700c clinchers were nearly impossible to find in the U.S.)

    [/quote]Since the Fiamme rims that are on the bike are tubulars, I presume they're 700c? [/quote]Yes, all "full sized" tubulars are.
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    Were the Campy brakes and tubular rims/tires a factory option, or is this something that would have had to have been changed out later? I believe I've read that the upgrade to Campy sidepulls was fairly common on these bikes, I was just wondering if it was such a common upgrade it was made a factory option?
    No. There were no "factory options" on these bikes. Sometimes the dealer would swap stuff out for the customer. Your wide range freewheel is likely an instance of that.

    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I want to keep this bike as vintage as possible, but at the same time I want to make it a practical bike to ride for an old mountain biker like me. My main areas of concern are the tubulars and the stock gearing. If I were to re-lace the hubs to different rims, is there anything anyone would recommend for a rim that would be appropriate? If I do this, I'd like to go with 700c clinchers, and something that has a hook edge so I can use high pressures............The bike has apparently had the original freewheel swapped out for a 14 x 31 (five speed). What would the original gearing have been? The Campy chainrings are 52 and 45, which I would think might be original. I really need lower gears all the way around (I'm used to low-geared triples ), but my desire to keep the Campy drivetrain as original as possible will probably over-ride that.
    The crank on that bike uses the old 144 mm bolt circle. The smallest ring possible is 41 teeth, and even those are quite rare.
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    Any ideas to get me some lower gears and yet stay with the original cranks and derailleurs? What about that "tripleizer" I've seen on Pastor Bob's Paramount, how does that work?
    A triplizer would work with your crank, but you're already pushing the limits of the Nuovo Record rear derailer, I'm afraid there's no way to get serious low gearing without going fairly anachronistic.

    Sheldon "My International Has No Authentic Parts Except The Headset" Brown
    http://sheldonbrown.com/international
    Code:
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
    |  Love seems the swiftest, but it is the slowest of all growths. |
    |  No man or woman really knows what perfect love is until they   |
    |  have been married a quarter of a century.        --Mark Twain  |
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
    [COLOR=blue][CENTER][b]Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts[/b]
    Phone 617-244-9772, FAX 617-244-1041
    [URL= http://harriscyclery.com] http://harriscyclery.com[/URL]
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    [URL=http://captainbike.com]http://captainbike.com[/URL]
    Useful articles about bicycles and cycling
    [URL=http://sheldonbrown.com]http://sheldonbrown.com[/URL] [/CENTER] [/COLOR]

  6. #6
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great info, guys, thanks very much!......So what about those Fiamme tubulars, are they decent as far as tubular rims go? Dumb question, but what the heck do you do if you have a flat out on the road with tubulars? I've seen folks carrying extra tires, but doesn't the gluing process take awhile?.......And does anyone know what the stock stem/handlebar would have been on this bike?

  7. #7
    SLJ 6/8/65-5/2/07 Walter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    SE Florida, USA aka the Treasure Coast
    Posts
    5,248
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well I stand corrected on chain ring options!


    “Life is not one damned thing after another. Life is one damned thing over and over.”
    Edna St. Vincent Millay

  8. #8
    SLJ 6/8/65-5/2/07 Walter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    SE Florida, USA aka the Treasure Coast
    Posts
    5,248
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do however stand by checking eBay for a 700C cliincher wheelset. You may not find something completely appropriate to 1972 but you can come pretty close and always have the sew-ups to switch back to.


    “Life is not one damned thing after another. Life is one damned thing over and over.”
    Edna St. Vincent Millay

  9. #9
    Gone, but not forgotten Sheldon Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Newtonville, Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
    Posts
    2,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    Great info, guys, thanks very much!......So what about those Fiamme tubulars, are they decent as far as tubular rims go? Dumb question, but what the heck do you do if you have a flat out on the road with tubulars? I've seen folks carrying extra tires, but doesn't the gluing process take awhile?.......And does anyone know what the stock stem/handlebar would have been on this bike?
    Back in the day, when I rode tubulars, I considered Fiamme the best. The red label model was a great all-around rim, the yellow label was super light.

    When you get a flat on tubulars, you just stick the spare on relying on the residual stickiness of the existing glue to get you home, and you take it easy on the corners.

    If you get a flat in the rain, you're S.O.L. 'cause nothing will stick. Tubulars are a major PITA, I woudn't recommend them for a "rider."

    Sheldon "Clinchas" Brown
    [COLOR=blue][CENTER][b]Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts[/b]
    Phone 617-244-9772, FAX 617-244-1041
    [URL= http://harriscyclery.com] http://harriscyclery.com[/URL]
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    [URL=http://captainbike.com]http://captainbike.com[/URL]
    Useful articles about bicycles and cycling
    [URL=http://sheldonbrown.com]http://sheldonbrown.com[/URL] [/CENTER] [/COLOR]

  10. #10
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Back in the day, when I rode tubulars, I considered Fiamme the best. The red label model was a great all-around rim, the yellow label was super light.

    When you get a flat on tubulars, you just stick the spare on relying on the residual stickiness of the existing glue to get you home, and you take it easy on the corners.

    If you get a flat in the rain, you're S.O.L. 'cause nothing will stick. Tubulars are a major PITA, I woudn't recommend them for a "rider."

    Sheldon "Clinchas" Brown
    Thanks Sheldon! Yeah, I'm thinking clinchers it will be, then. These Fiamme rims have a small yellow label on them, btw. Whatever I end up changing, I'll definitely keep all the old parts in case I want to rebuild it like it was when I received it later on-
    Last edited by well biked; 12-27-06 at 08:43 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,685
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fiamme Yellow Label tubular rims were the lightest rim they made back in the early to mid 70's. I rode them but I weighed 130lbs. back then, and they were for my race wheels.

    42th inner will be the smallest you will find without lots of searching, a Campagnolo ring will cost dearly but same fit alternatives can be had for much less, the 144mm bolt circle is the key, it was the size that others copied for quite a while, Sugino, SR, TA, later Stronglight to name a few.

    My 1971 came with a 14-24 T.D.C. freewheel from Raleigh, Renold chain.

    A 31 tooth freewheel may well be beyond the capacity of the rear mechanism, avoid the 52 x31 for sure, I would be surprised if it even makes it on the workstand.

    700c rims back in the 70's were around these parts all Super Champion, Mavic MA2's and MA3's came later, the tire supply was also an issue back then. Now, 27" tires are harder to source, at least that "look" correct, although I did just see some Botanger labled 27" clincher tires recently that looked the part at a local bike store, I would check a shop that sells Trek for those, might even consider them for mom's bike.

  12. #12
    Senior Member M-theory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sheldon: ""No. There were no "factory options" on these bikes. Sometimes the dealer would swap stuff out for the customer. Your wide range freewheel is likely an instance of that.""

    Hi Sheldon, I have a '72 International that was a chrome special order "factory option":

    http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/...3842&members=1

  13. #13
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    YT
    Posts
    7,473
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Congratulations. My worthless input is leave the bike as is except for getting a 42 small ring for the front. If you want it to be a REAL rider I would do it with something else. A bike like that of that vintage with a complete Record group is a beautiful thing especially if the group is matched. It's something I have coveted for some time and I have sourced the parts separately many of them will nicks and dings, when mine is done I am sure it will still not be as nice as yours. However you shouldn't let that keep you from riding it regularily. The spare tubular you carry should have a very light coat of glue on it so it will get you home no problem if you get a flat just don't take corners like you are in a race and they will stay on. Besides are you really going to ride a '72 international with full Nuovo record in the rain? I sure as hell wouldn't be, that's why I have a rain bike.
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

  14. #14
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    repechage: thanks for the input. It sounds like this bike was really tricked out with some of the best equipment of the day, with the yellow label Fiamme rims and all..........And I suspect you're right about the rear derailleur not being designed for such a widely spaced freewheel, I doubt it's designed for a large cog as big as a 31t. As much as I want lower gearing, I'm actually thinking about putting on something like a 14 x 26 or 14 x 28 freewheel. Does anyone know what the Nuovo Record rear derailleur is rated for in terms of largest cog and also chain wrap capacity?

    M-Theory: wow, what a beautiful bike!

    Cyclotoine: I'm still in shock about just having this bike, but rest assured I'll avoid rain with it like the plague. And I agree, a 42t small ring is something I'll be looking for. With that, even if I go with something like a 14 x 26 or 14 x 28 freewheel, I'll have two distinct gear ranges to work with.
    Last edited by well biked; 01-09-07 at 10:53 AM.

  15. #15
    Knows Bigfoot's Momma
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    My Bikes
    yeah; got a couple...
    Posts
    1,544
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by M-theory
    ...I have a '72 International that was a chrome special order "factory option":

    http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/...3842&members=1
    Are you the original owner of that one...? Unless you know the history of it, I'd suggest that someone had it chromed later on. The brazed-on cable hanger bridge has been removed from the seat stays, and the badge rivets were replaced with screws. Stem, bars, headset and brakes aren't original to the International, so maybe the chrome isn't either (?). I'm not picking at it; it's a pretty bike... Just not very much looks original there.
    nice lugs baby!

  16. #16
    Senior Member M-theory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I got the frame from the original owner who told me he ordered the bike that way. He had Raleigh make the frame without the cable hanger because it was getting Campy side-pulls. I put those screws in because it had rusty ones (but yes I know that they ususally have rivets...not sure why it doesn't).

    BTW.. supposedly the Stonglight headset, Campy brakes and the GB bars are original (or at least retailer-upgraded) I switched out the original GB stem for a late-70's 3ttt.

  17. #17
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just bought this 42t 144BCD Campy ring for the bike. It's apparently not the same vintage as the group that's on my bike (the rings on my bike say "patent," this ring says "brev"), but I think it will look okay: http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o...5/DSC04625.jpg

    I paid $20 for the chainring, including shipping (it was BIN). Not as much as I expected, actually. With a 42t small ring, and a 14 x 26 or 14 x 28 freewheel (yet to be purchased), I should be set for gearing. Will the derailleurs handle this?
    Last edited by well biked; 12-28-06 at 05:32 PM.

  18. #18
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
    My Bikes
    1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
    Posts
    14,357
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I concur with the others; the Raleigh International is a great frame, one I would be proud to own.

    In your quest for lower gears, ask yourself how tall a top gear you really require. I currently run 47/13 = 98 gear-inches on the Capo and 50/14 = 96 gear-inches on the Bianchi, and find these perfectly adequate for anyone willing to spin occasionally. Substituting a 47T for the stock 52T outer chainring will reduce the rear derailleur's wrap requirement by 5 teeth. A nice half-step-plus-grannie, such as 47-43-36 / 13-28 or even 46-42-36, may be within your stock derailleurs' capabilities, but will give you a 35-inch low and a high in the upper 90s.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  19. #19
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
    My Bikes
    1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
    Posts
    14,357
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I just bought this 42t 144BCD Campy ring for the bike. It's apparently not the same vintage as the group that's on my bike (the rings on my bike say "patent," this ring says "brev"), but I think it will look okay: http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o...5/DSC04625.jpg

    I paid $20 for the chainring, including shipping (it was BIN). Not as much as I expected, actually. With a 42t small ring, and a 14 x 26 or 14 x 28 freewheel (yet to be purchased), I should be set for gearing. Will the derailleurs handle this?
    Yup. I am delighted with the way my Campag. NRs perform with 50-42 / 14-16-18-20-23-26 gearing, which provides the range I need with the relatively tight gear-to-gear progression I desire.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  20. #20
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, John! You make a good point about reducing the big ring's size to reduce the overall chain wrap requirement of the rear derailleur. But you're saying if I were to run 52/42 x 14/28 with the NR derailleurs you think it would work okay, correct?......I'm new to the Campy stuff, but I know from experience what my ideal road gearing is for the type of riding I do, and approx. 100 gear inches is what I like for my highest gear. On my '83 Schwinn le tour luxe, I'm running 46/36/24 with an 11 x 32 nine speed cassette, with bar-end shifters (indexed rear), and I absolutely love it. It's hilly here, and I often commute around town on the bike, carrying anything from library books to groceries, therefore the extra low gears. On the '83 Centurion Pro Tour I'm currently building up, the gearing will be very similar to the Schwinn, 48/36/24 x 13/32 six speed freewheel, with downtube friction shifters. My oldest son and I plan to do some touring one of these days, and those will be the bikes for it. For the International, I really want to keep the NR group intact, so I'll do whatever I have to gearing-wise to do so. I hope for the International to be my fast bike for group or other recreational rides, maybe do an occasional century on it, or at least some long "day tours." I think I'll want the 52 x 14 for this (98 gear inches), but I'll reduce the big ring's size if the NR rear derailleur won't handle a 42 x 28 low gear along with the 52 x 14 high gear-
    Last edited by well biked; 12-28-06 at 05:14 PM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    '85 Nishiki Tri-A, early '90's Nishiki Tange Prestige, '84 Trek 610, mid-'80's Miele (unknown), '72 all chrome Raleigh International, '81 Trek 412, 84 Specialized StumpJumper
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by M-theory
    Sheldon: ""No. There were no "factory options" on these bikes. Sometimes the dealer would swap stuff out for the customer. Your wide range freewheel is likely an instance of that.""

    Hi Sheldon, I have a '72 International that was a chrome special order "factory option":

    http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/...3842&members=1

    Mtheory---I was just scrolling around here and clicked your photos link. Those pics are the EXACT same pics that were used in an ebay posting from "chrisgins" this past September 28 for a 72 International all chrome that I won. I have the bike at home now and it's exactly as the seller described and as the pics capture.

    Are the pics in your link of your current bike? If so, something weird is going on here...

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    sweet...another 1972 Raleigh...I too have a G series(G2998) Raleigh International that I am restoring for tours, centuries, and group rides here in Portland Or. Unfortuantly mine has been stripped of all its campy NR components. I am wanting to keep mine mostly original yet still be able to climb hills and ride on the flats relativly fast...sounds like the hints above will help...let me know if anyone hears of some 70's campy record parts for sale. I may be asking some questions about the project real soon.

  23. #23
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kjurt
    sweet...another 1972 Raleigh...I too have a G series(G2998) Raleigh International that I am restoring for tours, centuries, and group rides here in Portland Or. Unfortuantly mine has been stripped of all its campy NR components. I am wanting to keep mine mostly original yet still be able to climb hills and ride on the flats relativly fast...sounds like the hints above will help...let me know if anyone hears of some 70's campy record parts for sale. I may be asking some questions about the project real soon.
    Cool.......What color is yours, chartreuse green or champagne?

  24. #24
    Paramount Fan
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    My Bikes
    Paramounts, Pros, Colnago, Masi, Sachs, Moulton, Witcomb, Motobecane, Bianchis, Fat City, others, mostly '70s-'80s
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Chrome International

    I'm not convinced that chrome is from the factory. A savvy shop could have had a stock International stripped, polished and chromed for enough of a premium.

    As far as the bike in question is concerned, I have ridden sewups since 1972 and still use them on most of my bikes. I like the ride, have lots of spare rims, tires and supplies and love the feel of sewups (though I suspect that most of that is in my soft head). I have to ride almost 4 miles of dirt road to get to pavement and often get stuck on dirt roads if I am on a new ride, since I live in Vermont. I have found sewups to be much more resistant to pinch flats than 23 mm or narrower clinchers. With all that said, sewups are like cigars. Don't recommend them to anyone unless they are already hooked. They are just not worth the hassle. Affordable ones almost never run true; you spend a lot more time gluing them than mounting clinchers; when they're glued right, they're a pain to get off the rim; there's no way to patch "the second flat"; and you'll be nervous about trusting the grip of the residual glue after replacing a flatted tire. Even though I know how to glue tires, have never rolled a tire and feel that tubulars corner better, I always feel more confident on curvy mountain descents riding clinchers.

    With all that said, the desire to keep the sewups on this particular machine is commendable. I suggest keeping these intact with a pair of fresh sewups held on with that expensive Tufo tape, which grips like iron. The alternative is to have an experienced mechanic glue them on for you. Make sure it's someone who rides them and not just someone who wrenches in a bikeshop. A mechanic who really knows sewups might not want to do it just out of liability. The Tufo tires are quite round, since they are not true sewups and small punctures can be repaired with their sealent, but they are expensive and I am told that they have a "dead" ride compared to standard sewups. Spending the money to buy something like a Vittoria CX will give you a great ride, but how you will sob at the first flat. BTW, I've fixed punctures in standard sewups with Tufo sealant successfully. It really beats patching, which is a total pain. Also, be sure to get one of those Zeus rubber band style carriers for your spare or stick it in a jersey pocket. It's not as good for the tire, but if you stuff it in a bag, your riding partners might not know you are riding tubulars, and where's the fun in that?

    Build yourself up a nice pair of clinchers for regular riding. If you can get silver rims, then go for it, but stick to 700C and be done with it. You won't have to readjust the brakes when you swap out your sewup wheels and it's too hard to find good 27" tires, which are really the only "period-correct" option. 700C clinchers were unobtainium in the US in 1972.

    Gearing-wise, you got a hell of a deal finding a 42t Campy chainring for $20. You are one lucky dude. There's a lot of us poor saps who would love to have your karma. Slap that on there with that 52 and anyone who can't get that to shift like butter on a 14-26 shouldn't be bragging about their mechanical skills. Watch the spacing between the inside of the derailleur pulley cage and the spokes in low gear. You're best combination will likely be a Suntour New Winner Ultra-Six freewheel (get a new one and be prepared to pay dearly), and a Sachs 8-speed chain. If you want to stay correct, find an Atom or Regina 5-speed cluster. They tend to be affordable. Don't respace the rear triangle and just forget about index shifting on this bike. With your luck, you may be ok with a used freewheel, but the chances for disappointment are excellent. The range depends on your legs and the terrain. Really fit riders with great joints can get up almost anything with a 42-24. If you are going to tackle mountains on this bike, or if you are a huff&puffer, you are going to have to put that Nuovo Record derailleur in a nice, lined box on the mantle and install a wide-range changer. I don't know how it is surviving trying to shift to that 31. A good mechanic can stretch it to a 28 and I have seen one shift a 30, with complaints, but that's far beyond its range. Find yourself an early Shimano Crane or Schwinn LeTour derailleur (same thing, really), or a Suntour VGT Luxe, if you want to stay in the era. If you are going to tackle real mountains, go to Peter White Cycles for a TA triplizer and a suitable granny ring. You will need to swap out the bottom bracket for one with a longer spindle (you can't and shouldn't try to match a longer spindle to your existing cups), but you'll be able to climb anything.

    Be sure you ride this bike a few hundred miles before sinking any serious scratch into it. You want to be sure you like the fit and the ride before making extensive mods. Also, you will be surprised what a little TLC will do to brighten it up. Chrome polish, oiled 0000 steel wool, metal polish, paste wax and a few hours work can get this baby gleaming again. Don't even try to match the paint with touchup; just wax over it. With your luck, you may even find a set of white Blumels fenders for it--oooh, bbbaaaabyyyyyyy!!!!!

    Here's my '71 Pro that I use most often for my 20 mile commute into work--with sewups!

  25. #25
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    sbarner, thanks for that write-up. Lots of great info there, I really appreciate it-
    Last edited by well biked; 12-29-06 at 08:24 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •