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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    My new Raleigh find

    I posted a few days ago about the Raleigh Sprite I bought on Ebay. It's like new in most respects. Paint and chrome as nice as I would ever expect. Tires looked good but the minute I touched them they began to fall apart in my hands. Picked up a nice set of 27 X 1 1/4's today that have the mustard dolored band on them, like the old ones. The Allvit deraileur does not budge, however. I don't know if it's the D itself or the cables. I'm going to take it down and soak it in degreaser and see if it behaves any better. It's abvious that this bike has not been ridden in many years. There are chunks of stuff that looks like little dirt clods stuck to the pulleys in the RD. The chain is gummy. I figure while I'm at it I'll clean the cogs and the chain and if no good then replace. I'll probably replace the cable no matter what. I also wonder if I should replace the cogs and the chainring since I'm going through all that labor anyway in removing the wheels to put on new tires and cleaning the RD. This is only a 5 speed so no FD. I know it's not a great bike and probably relatively heavy but it is so clean otherwise and I think that's the important part as parts can be fixed or replaced. To me it's just real cute, even it the yellow color is a little flamboyant. I'm a big burley guy.

    Now for some really stupid questions:

    I saw a bike tool kit on the Performance flyer. Spin Doctor Essential for $44.99 or the Team Tool kit for $109. My question is whether these tools will fit both my Raleigh and my much newer (2006) Trek 7100 Hybird. Is there such a thing as metric vs. American as in cars? Do I even need special tools? I figure I'm headed for BB and head...thing rebuild as well. Will I need any special tools since this is an old Raleigh?

    Thanks in advance. Here is a pic of the bike once again. I'll take my own pics as I rehab this thing.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...8389&rd=1&rd=1

    Mirko
    Last edited by mirkee; 12-29-06 at 07:39 PM.

  2. #2
    Paramount Fan
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    Only an adjustable wrench will fit your bike. Other than the bolts on the rear derailleur, everything on your Sprite is Whitworth thread, and neither metric nor SAE wrenches will fit them. Gotta love the Brits. Just talk to a Morris or MG owner. A worn 7/16" might squeeze over the stem bolts and you might find a 6-point wrench will fit well enough for some of the others. That bike's in real nice shape for a $50 special.

  3. #3
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    I'm not familiar with those kits, so I don't know what they do and don't include, but for your new Sprite, you'll need a set of metric wrenches. A 3-way 8, 9, 10mm is invaluable, as are a set of 11-15mm wrenches. That should allow you to take off just about every nut and bolt. For the headset, a 12" adjustable wrench and a large vise grip will suffice unless you want to invest in a set of headset wrenches (not necessary). For the BB, you'll need a 16mm thin-walled wrench for the adjustable cup (a 16mm cone wrench works well for this) and a lock-ring tool for the lock ring though a hammer and punch can suffice if you have a gentle touch. Throw in some tire irons, a chain-link remover, and a wire cutter, and you're good to go. Unless, of course, you want to replace the freewheel, and then you need the particular freewheel removal tool for that, too!

    Neal

  4. #4
    Non Tribuo Anus Rodentum and off to the next adventure (RIP) Stacey's Avatar
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    Your 27" Sprite should be metric. Most work can be done with common tools, You will need some special tools for adjusting wheel bearings etc, those you can pick up as you need.

    That's quite a pretty bike, good luck with your prize.

    Oh, one thing... those tires will only take British air

  5. #5
    Bike Junkie roccobike's Avatar
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    Good luck with your new (to you) bike. It looks like it's in great shape.
    I've purchased a number of old 10 speed bikes and only ran into only one freewheel (cog set) that needed to be replaced. If I were you, I'd just take a little oil and run it into the freewheel to keep the bearings lubed inside the unit and keep it. As for the Huret Allvit deraileur, my one owner 72 Raleigh Record has one, only because I don't ride that bike and have not had the time to replace the deraileur.
    IMHO, any good condition Shimano or Suntour rear DR is a major improvement over the Allvit. You may want to keep/hang on to the original deraileur in your spare parts bin because that bike is so nice and original, but I would seriously consider replacing it for riding purposes.
    Roccobike BF Official Thread Terminator

  6. #6
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    Well, I did remove the Allvit RD and have it soaking in a solution of fancy Simple Green type of stuff I got from the LBS. Now that I have it off, I'm thinking of just replacing it with a modern RD. They seem to be so cheap at the LBS. They have a Shimano for $10, new on clearance sale. Any recommendations on a RD for this bike? It's only a 5 speed with no FD. I'll save the Allvit in a biaggie for future use.

    The cogs cleaned up real nice although I just flossed them on the wheel. I will replace the two tires since they literally fall apart in your hands if you handle them too much. I will also replace the cables to the RD and possibly the brake cables as well, if I get ambitious.

    I'm already getting stressed about all the nuts and bolts and stuff lying around. I think I'm going to start taking pictures of everything before and as I take it apart for reference. Hope I don't have to ask too many questions here. Hate to bring the bike to the bike shop in a big plastic bag and ask them to put it back together

    I wanted a bike to tinker with and thought this one was too perfect and would not need tinkering. Well, I was wrong. It's clean and all but it is really gunked up. I don't think it's been ridden in 30 years.

    YOu guys have been a lot of help. Thanks again!

    Mirko

  7. #7
    Glutton for Punishment
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    Good idea, taking digital pics of things before they get shuffled (and they always do). Also good idea swapping out that Huret rear derailleur; it's just a crude piece of crap. The front derailleur is okay, but after 20 or 30 years the pivots for the shoe get all gummed up, the result being a unit that will shift up to the large cog just fine, then won't shift down again until you push it back with your hand. Take it off, disassemble it, let it sit in some Simple Green for a while, and put it back together -- Presto! Good for another 30 years..

  8. #8
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    Sorry if this is an obvious piece of advice, but if you're going to be overhauling several things, best to do them one at a time. I've seen examples of folks taking everything apart and then having a big pile of nuts, bolts, and parts without knowing what goes where. So work on the rear brake first, then the front, etc. If the RD is that gunked up, replacing brake cables/housing and brake pads will probably be a good idea, too. That's a relatively easy and inexpensive task. And you can find tons of excellent advice from Sheldon Brown here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/repair/.

    Neal

  9. #9
    Lanky Lass East Hill's Avatar
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    Digital cameras have made the tinkerer's life much easier. Take photos of everything! You'd be surprised at how messy things can get in a hurry, especially if it's the first time you've done it. It gets much easier after the second or third time, until you hit something like Campagnolo...or a Sturmey-Archer hub...or.... .

    East Hill
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