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Old 01-30-07, 12:20 AM   #1
Christof H
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what are old bikes' traits?

Okay, I've mostly got my mid 80s KHS special figured out, and I know my wife's '77 sekai sprint 1000 is decent enough for what it is (and with all original components minus bar end shifters and new bars)- pretty sweet ride, really.

Here's what else I've got, and I don't know a lot about some of these- (n my 21 inchish size range unless otherwise noted)

Unknown serial number old fuji Special Road Racer, frame only minus forks. (actually, the sugino bb setup looks original, and is pretty smooth). It's white with black highlighting at the lugs, old enamel fuji headbadge, chromed stays, and I can't find a serial number.....

Bridgestone City Limit. needs a thorough going over, but all bits there except seat.... Serial is 9KG24452. It's red. Seems nicer than any of the ATB type bikes I've tried riding, but I won't know until I get it tuned and ride it. Might be a keeper.

Peugot UO8 frames. 3, ranging from 71 to 75. I pretty much know about these, but the values on the intarweb are ALL over the board.

Old Raleigh Sports (malaysia production?) all there except the wheels, but I've got some, and 4 or 5 SA AW 3's (someday I'll find an FM and a dynohub and my schwinn club racer will be complete). I like the whole idea of the roadster, but never have had a decent running one (I won't count a Schwinn Breeze as decent by any stretch,nor a murray anything..) No obvious serno, and it's going to need a complete painting and such anyway. I may restore as a riding bike, but I won't go for original decals or anything.

A Lotus 2000R "pro series". I haven't met anyone who actually has heard of these, but the intarwebs claim they are pretty sweet ride. Currently set up with a 3 speed coaster brake conversion for lots of short quick riding fun.

A Puch step through- kinda tiny, complete, even the foamy grips are okay. I'm assuming based on the dual levers and foamie grips that it ain't much, but it's not obnoxiously heavy or anything. Actually, it's pretty nice rolling stock as is, even without a minor truing and lube job. (I just tried it). Way too small for me, but pretty sweet. M-6-F6077


A Sekai 1500- ID0456 - All I can tell is it looks like original components except the front DR is an suntour xcm lite (rear is a 7-gt, just like the '77 sprint 1000)- but the wheels are missing *sigh* - oh, and it's a step through.

I won't even get into the Schwinns. I've got let tours, super le tours, and even super le tour 12.2 frames (being built with a shimano 7 speed), a world traveller, a varsity, and that weird ass tourist model with the freewheel in the bottom bracket.

No real gems, lots of rideable fun, but some mysteries in the history.
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Old 01-30-07, 06:49 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christof H
Bridgestone City Limit. needs a thorough going over, but all bits there except seat.... Serial is 9KG24452. It's red. Seems nicer than any of the ATB type bikes I've tried riding, but I won't know until I get it tuned and ride it. Might be a keeper.
My grocery-run/live-under-a-tarp-in-the-backyard bike is a 1991 Bridgestone CB-1 City Limit. The newest bike I own! It's a fairly standard Taiwanese-made TIG-welded cromoly steel frame, but the geometry is nicely spread out, and it handles a load very well. I have it set up with Ritchey Tom Slick 26 x 1.4 tires, front basket, rear rack and panniers, Nitto flat townie bars, 6-speed gearing. Nice bike.

Neal
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File Type: jpg CB1Baskets.jpg (96.7 KB, 61 views)
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Old 01-30-07, 07:11 AM   #3
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With a collection like yours--- post pictures please!
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Old 01-30-07, 07:17 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christof H
I won't even get into the Schwinns. ........and that weird ass tourist model with the freewheel in the bottom bracket.
I presume that it has a Shimano FFW (Front Freewheel). It was Shimano's attempt to build a derailleur bike with some of the benefits of an internal gear hub (you could shift while coasting) without the mechanical complexity. They were a commercial failure and didn't stay on the market very long.
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Old 01-30-07, 09:44 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by HillRider
... Shimano FFW (Front Freewheel). It was Shimano's attempt to build a derailleur bike with some of the benefits of an internal gear hub (you could shift while coasting) without the mechanical complexity. They were a commercial failure and didn't stay on the market very long.
Some of these evolutionary dead ends, including my under-the-chainstay Shimano U-brake and drilled-for-brake cable Nitto handlebar stem, are fascinating.
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Old 01-30-07, 09:48 AM   #6
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Returning to your title question regarding old bikes' traits, what I value most about classic road bikes is appearance; relaxed, comfortable frame geometry; generous tire clearances; and incredibly durable, easily maintained friction gear changers. What I like least about them are ineffective brakes (primarily due to brake pads and cable housings, but the long reaches and nonaero brake handles both reduce leverage) and OEM low-pressure clincher tires.
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Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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Old 01-30-07, 10:10 AM   #7
Christof H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nlerner
My grocery-run/live-under-a-tarp-in-the-backyard bike is a 1991 Bridgestone CB-1 City Limit. The newest bike I own! It's a fairly standard Taiwanese-made TIG-welded cromoly steel frame, but the geometry is nicely spread out, and it handles a load very well. I have it set up with Ritchey Tom Slick 26 x 1.4 tires, front basket, rear rack and panniers, Nitto flat townie bars, 6-speed gearing. Nice bike.

Neal

That's something like I was thinking of doing with mine- I cudl sell it, but we have a lot of "semi wild" rural countryside around here and it's fun to tool around and pick wild fruit and such. My active rides don't take to that very well, except the fixie. Racks and moderate tires and just accept the weight of thorn resistant tubes...

Definitely a 6 speed conversion, the area around here is really flat. More range is needed to head up to lake berryessa, but that's for a road bike.

And I'll try to get photos soon!
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Old 01-30-07, 01:24 PM   #8
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photos!

here's the John Deere yellow fixie.

Paint is all messed up because 1: I built this 2 years ago and it's been through hell. 2: I wiated 2 hours before I assembled and rode it, and 3: I didn't put any finish on the el cheapo krylon. This was my first buildout, I was impatient, and We're Poor.

It's an original Schwinn Mesa Runner, back when MTBs had adjustable dropouts I put a 26 inch fixed wheeld on, it runs tom slick 1.4s, is aggressive in the gearing, has a cheap dumpster generator, and salvages mudflap thingies. But it's a smooth and wonderful ride, zips through town and along the tracks really nicely. And- hey- it's a fixed gear mountain bike!






This is the Puch 130 as it came from the junkpile. It needs a cleanup and front wheel truing, but everything (even the brake cables and DR adjustments) is fine and smooth, except the broken pedal.



***




Here's the lotus getting a new bottom bracket, yes, it is running ea3s. yes, that's a 3 speed, and yep, coaster brake. Once I get the fenders on it will bea good all year ride, since wedo have our share of mudsome winters. zippy!





The 1977 (two years older than my wife!) Sekai sprint 1000 I built up for her college commuting. Haven't painted the frame yet, but all original except one wheel and the new bars/shifters. (and the jelly seat). Sweet ride for her first roadie.



***





The Fuji special road racer frame on my work bench, as organized by my 3 year old son.




And the Bridgestone as it came from the localbike co op (where I am a volunteer minister). Hadn't even inflated the tires yet on that photo




The Puch is definitely being sold, maybe to a housemate. I'm trying to find a decent price for a fully checked out, tunes, and reconditioned ride like that, I was thinking of asking $90. Maybe $110 if I put new tires on. (inexpensive contis)

I want to play with the bridgestone, at least. It may end up being sold to the right person.

The Sekai stays for now, if I can find a larger KHS special for wife, then we'll have matching grand tourers and it can go if she doesn't want it (she's also got a dahon and a ez recumbent)

The Yellow Bomb has been mine for long enough I might redo it right and sell it for $100. Might be a touch of cachet in a fixie atb.

And I'm not anywhere near done with the lotus yet
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Old 01-31-07, 11:41 AM   #9
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nlerner, that is a really cool bike. My Giant Yukon wants to be like that when it grows up.
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Old 01-31-07, 05:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John E
Returning to your title question regarding old bikes' traits, what I value most about classic road bikes is appearance; relaxed, comfortable frame geometry; generous tire clearances; and incredibly durable, easily maintained friction gear changers. What I like least about them are ineffective brakes (primarily due to brake pads and cable housings, but the long reaches and nonaero brake handles both reduce leverage) and OEM low-pressure clincher tires.
I think brake cables and housings are an area where vintage, with two very notable exceptions, is not better. I've made huge improvements in some old brake systems by rebuilding everything with either new cables, with vintage Nuovo Record housings and inners, or with Modolo housings and inners. Paying rabid attention to dressing the ends and proper routing helps get good performance out of old brakes. A lot of the cables of yesterday were garbage. The NOS DuraAce set that came with a set of 1974 DA calipers ended up being as squishy as can be, same for several sets of Shimano 600 6207 series.

Keep the old calipers and perhaps even the shoes. I haven't found modern shoes to be much better than old Campy and Shimano once the entire system is clean and lubed and the cables are properly set up.

Use single pivots, it puts hair on your chest!

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Old 01-31-07, 05:54 PM   #11
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Well, I religiously run new cables and housings - but I almost have to since most of the time I am eitherdealing with completely shot rusted cables or I'm doing something like my lotus rebuild and have to re run everything anyway. Brake shoes - depends on condition.

Tires... So, my first commuter experience was on a 20 inch wheeled bike, nice ride, but stock with "smooth bmx" tires rated at 45psi. I popped in 90psi kevlar hoopdeedoos and the difference was SO dramatic, I tend to just spring for new tires unless I've lucked into really decent road/touring tires already.

And let me tell you, the day I discovered 1.4 slicks on a mtb.....MAN.
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Old 01-31-07, 07:00 PM   #12
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what are old bike traits
If they are at my house.... old bikes find their way to Wahoo's Home for Wayward Cycles...I have about a dozen or so "good" bikes and about another dozen whatever people have dropped of along the way. And that doesn't include the badly damaged stuff that is in the recycle pile My tastes run to the utility side of things, my all time favorite bike is my 1972 Raleigh Superbe. The next one I ride the most is probably either my Redline 9.2.5 ( I know not vintage) or my 1968 Raleigh Compact RSW. The rest get ridden when the mood strikes or in some cases when the weather or conditions dictate.

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Old 02-10-07, 02:44 PM   #13
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On the Lotus... It was my first road bike. I bought a Lotus 2000R for $150 from Sears in 1992. I just found an old photo, so it's a bit funny to see someone mention one....
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