Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Fo Cereal?! DonKristoph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    (Soon to be) N. Carolingian
    My Bikes
    Guerciotti
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Steel frame question...

    I've been looking to start my first build up of a bike, but I wanted to know which type of steel I should be looking at getting. I know a bike is a bike, and I'm not terribly conserned with weight, but are there any that I should just say no to? I currently have a Guerciotti made with Columbus SLX, but am unfamiliar with Reynolds or any of the Japanese tubing, or other "materials' out there.

    Thanks,

    Kris.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Clinton Hill, Brooklyn
    Posts
    508
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Kris,

    Your questions must be answered with more questions, as you fail to provide any context for the bike in question. You have an italian bike designed for racing - what is the intended use for your new build? How much are you willing to spend? And be warned that opinions on this matter will vary - some will argue that it's not the steel, it's the care spent in constructing the frame that counts.

    In my opinion, a vintage bike that is intended for frequent riding is one that is manufactured with care, and built up with good-quality components that suit the bike's intended purpose. Type of steel is an important variable, but it is just that: one, of many, variables.

    Back to your original question: here is a link to a chart that lists a variety of manufacturers' steel tubesets, their weights, maximum rider weights, wall thicknesses, and intended usages:

    http://www.desperadocycles.com/Tubin...per_Tubing.htm

    Reynolds, Ishiwata, Tange, Columbus, and True Temper all have good reputations for manufacturing high-quality steel tubesets (there are others, they just don't stick out in my mind right now), but again - a badly built-up bike made from the finest steel will still be a pain in the arse to ride, and end up sitting in the garage.

    Good luck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •