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  1. #1
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    Fixed Gear Skid Stop Help

    I recently converted my old bianchi into a fixed gear, and was hoping to learn how to skid stop (and yes I know it wears down your tires) does anyone have any advice?

  2. #2
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    Sorry bud - wrong forum.

    Post your question in SS and Fixed Gear, and get ready to be flamed.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Swing and a miss. Try the search function and limit your results to the SS/FG sub-forum.

  4. #4
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    Blasphemer!

  5. #5
    MADE IN HONG KONG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Fat Guy
    Blasphemer!
    if this was for converting an old bianchi,
    it may not be so bad, it can still be another POS

    if it were for "using the search function"
    If you are not having any fun, it's all your fault

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bikedued's Avatar
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    Pick your right foot up off the pedal, and put the bottom of your shoe on the rear tire in front of the seat stays. Then lean way forwards and hang on for dear life. Nah just kidding, I know nothing about fixed gear bikes, except that they can ruin your knees.,,,,BD
    "Whale. Oil. Beef. Hooked!" The Rumjacks

  7. #7
    car dodger norskagent's Avatar
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    practice on some wet grass or smooth wet concrete, or sandy pavement. Once you learn the basic technique you can do it on dry pavement, only harder.

  8. #8
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
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    First of all, you better have a track hub with a LH threaded lockring. Hop the back wheel off the ground and lock your feet in the 3 o'clock/9 o'clock position. You should also be aware that it's illegal to ride on the street in most jurisdictions without real brakes, so you should at least keep the front one. As was already mentioned, you'll find out a lot more about this stuff lurking in the Singlespeed & Fixed forum.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
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    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
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  9. #9
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    I just know this from reading, since I don't ride fixed.

    You should be aware that depending on the number of teeth on your chainring and cog you may be wearing out a very small number of places on your tire... Choosing different cog/chainring combinations can give you different number of wear patches on the rear tire.

    The ratios make the difference... maybe not realistic gears, but a 40/20 gives a very small number of patches, and 41/21 or 39/19 would give a lot more... The trick is to pick front and rear gears that don't share common factors...
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

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  10. #10
    road curmudgeon, FG rider GeraldChan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Fat Guy
    Blasphemer!
    Why the conversion hate? A bike that get ridden is better than one that gathers dust.
    As Sheldon Brown mentions on his website, the vintage bikes with their horizontal Campy or Suntour drop outs are perfect for FG usage. These types of bikes are great fun and a very nice complement to geared bikes. The frame are sweet riding and besides that's what the racers from the late 60's and early 70's did. Those who could not afford a true track bike just removed the shifters, derailleaurs and freewheels in the winter and spun on a 16 or 17 T cog and held it in place with red Loctite and a bb lockring ( some derisively refer to this as a suicide hub).
    I don't recommend backpedaling as it is not good for the knees (unless you ride an "urban" ratio in the 50-60 gear inches). I prefer to keep BOTH brakes on and ONLY pedal in the forward direction; but then I'm an official old fart and ride FG for fitness and spin and NOT for "Urban Hipsterism" tricks, and never brakeless.
    Gerry

    PS A fixie conversion can easily be restored to vintage condition in less than an hour so what is the big deal? Now don't get me started on converting tubular tire equipped C&V bikes over to clinchers!
    1973 Nishiki Professional, steel, green/black, Campy NR FG conversion, Brooks Pro
    1991 Serotta Colorado II, steel, pearl white, full DA 8 spd STI, SI Flite
    2002 Waterford 1700 Track, steel, jet black, DA, Ultegra and Phil, SI Flite
    2006 Trek Madone 5.2, carbon fiber, blue, Ultegra and Bontrager, Fizik Arione

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeraldChan
    Why the conversion hate? A bike that get ridden is better than one that gathers dust.
    As Sheldon Brown mentions on his website, the vintage bikes with their horizontal Campy or Suntour drop outs are perfect for FG usage. These types of bikes are great fun and a very nice complement to geared bikes. The frame are sweet riding and besides that's what the racers from the late 60's and early 70's did. Those who could not afford a true track bike just removed the shifters, derailleaurs and freewheels in the winter and spun on a 16 or 17 T cog and held it in place with red Loctite and a bb lockring ( some derisively refer to this as a suicide hub).
    I don't recommend backpedaling as it is not good for the knees (unless you ride an "urban" ratio in the 50-60 gear inches). I prefer to keep BOTH brakes on and ONLY pedal in the forward direction; but then I'm an official old fart and ride FG for fitness and spin and NOT for "Urban Hipsterism" tricks, and never brakeless.
    Gerry

    PS A fixie conversion can easily be restored to vintage condition in less than an hour so what is the big deal? Now don't get me started on converting tubular tire equipped C&V bikes over to clinchers!
    No hate from me, but after the dérailleur braze ons are filed off, for that 'clean look' it is tough to convert back. I have three sets of tubulars and one set of clinchers, all original, for my 80's Italian bikes. I ride mainly clinchers in AZ (too many thorns) and tubulars in MI. No problem with conversions, though I do hate seeing nice bikes ruined by removing braze ons.

  12. #12
    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    put your balls on the stem.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  13. #13
    road curmudgeon, FG rider GeraldChan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Fat Guy
    No hate from me, but after the dérailleur braze ons are filed off, for that 'clean look' it is tough to convert back. I have three sets of tubulars and one set of clinchers, all original, for my 80's Italian bikes. I ride mainly clinchers in AZ (too many thorns) and tubulars in MI. No problem with conversions, though I do hate seeing nice bikes ruined by removing braze ons.
    I think that trying to make a C&V road frame look like a faux track bike is silly. Filing or cutting off hangers won't make it look like a true track frame. I also find the habit of eschewing brakes a silly and dangerous style. But hey it's your bike so do anything you want with it!
    Gerry
    1973 Nishiki Professional, steel, green/black, Campy NR FG conversion, Brooks Pro
    1991 Serotta Colorado II, steel, pearl white, full DA 8 spd STI, SI Flite
    2002 Waterford 1700 Track, steel, jet black, DA, Ultegra and Phil, SI Flite
    2006 Trek Madone 5.2, carbon fiber, blue, Ultegra and Bontrager, Fizik Arione

  14. #14
    The Legitimiser Sammyboy's Avatar
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    Nuts on the stem to unweight the rear wheel, strongest leg back, lock it out. Try it on grass, or wet road at first, since it'll be too scary on tarmac til you're used to it.

  15. #15
    Fattest Thin Man Az B's Avatar
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    Install a rear brake?

    Do I win?

    Az

  16. #16
    The Legitimiser Sammyboy's Avatar
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    No. Although having at least one and better two brakes is a really good idea on every bike.

  17. #17
    *****es love tarck kemmer's Avatar
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    Lean as far forward as you can (balls on the stem) while pedaling and when your strongest leg is at the bottom of your stroke, lock that leg. It will push you up and forward, when this happens pull up with your other foot. It's too easy to skid on grass and a technique that works on grass won't transfer to dry pavement (at least it didn't work for me). When I started riding fixed, the first time it rained I skidded up a storm and when the streets dried I had it down. If you have to, take a hose to the street and go to town. Oh yeah, and the faster you're going the easier (but scarier) it is.

  18. #18
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
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    skidding makes little sense to me, it's less efficient than using resistance to slow down and it wears out tires faster, it's fun and looks cool but seems like and expensive habit.

    As for the endless and tiresome conversion debate. I have seen some horror invoking conversions. Here is an example of a bad conversion (bad in the sense that the bike has been irreversibly changed):

    http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2007/may/JonHagar.htm

    the powder coat is the icing on the cake for this one, might as well have chopped of the derailleur hanger. I know you can go to clamp on now but it's not the same.

    Edit: Of course you can ruin a bike by ADDING braze ons as well, though they can be removed and paint restored. Wish my 1975 Jeunet didn't undergo the update in the 80s.
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

  19. #19
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Az B
    Install a rear brake?
    A rear brake is about as effective as no brake at all for slowing a fixed wheel. A front brake is the handbrake of choice.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
    1977 Nishiki Landau
    1967 Jeunet Captivante track bike
    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
    "index shifters = frets on a fiddle"

  20. #20
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OLDYELLR
    A rear brake is about as effective as no brake at all for slowing a fixed wheel. A front brake is the handbrake of choice.
    i will have to politely disagree. Helps me out a lot (in addition to the front of course)
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

  21. #21
    Junior Member timpossible's Avatar
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    go out in the rain and essentially try to pedal in reverse as you lean forward to unweight the rear tire. bullhorn style bars make it easier. run a front brake at least until you get the hang of it. you should probably keep it once you do get the hang of it, i refer to it as an "oh ****" handle.

    as far as the hatred towards converts, as long as it's done correctly so as to be safe mechanically who cares? for every classic bike that's converted, that makes your original unmolested one worth that much more. you can probably buy their removed parts for cheap too.

  22. #22
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
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    cyclotoine, I will concede that mere mortals can control a rear handbrake easier than exerting braking pressure via the pedals, but the ultimate stopping power is the same in both cases with a locked rear wheel. A skid is a skid. You will always be able to stop a bike quickest with the front brake alone on the verge of doing an endo, because there will be no weight on the rear wheel.

    timpossible, indeed, there is no shame in converting a vintage road bike to fixed, so long as you don't go hacking off the derailleur hanger. In fact, it was a common practise to do so in order ride in the winter in Europe years ago.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
    1977 Nishiki Landau
    1967 Jeunet Captivante track bike
    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
    "index shifters = frets on a fiddle"

  23. #23
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
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    A real skid stop say with a coaster brake allows you to keep your weight on the rear, but the technique for fixed hinges on taking your weight off. In fact it has become a competitive sport (longest skid) and art forum (most unusual forum skid stop) etc.... I can't speak from experience because I haven't ridden fixed on the street of late and when I get my street fixed gear finished it'll be a suicide hug so I don't intend to skid stop. But I guess if you initiate the skid and transfer your weight back over the rear it would slow you down but you'll have to bend your knee and therefor won't be able to hold the cranks as easy and then i can see the wheel rotating again. No?
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

  24. #24
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    First off, use a pedal setup you trust - no worn out cleats, half-dead straps, etc. Go out to a smooth parking lot, ride standing up with lots of weight on your hands, and then skid, strong foot pushing back, weak foot pulling up. Repeat 100x.

    Next start your skid while sitting, then shifting your weight forward. This is closer to a real life situation, and you should get it down.

    If you're skidding on a really wet road, you should be able to do it without much of a forward weight shift, which is good, because you'll slow down faster, and keep better control of your rear wheel path (fishtailing is fun and easy in the rain; so is smacking a curb with your rear wheel).
    Quote Originally Posted by marqueemoon
    The correct response is "I live with your mom."

  25. #25
    My bikes became Vintage OLDYELLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclotoine
    if you initiate the skid and transfer your weight back over the rear it would slow you down but you'll have to bend your knee and therefor won't be able to hold the cranks as easy and then i can see the wheel rotating again. No?
    Not the way I described it, hopping the back wheel and locking your legs straight in the 3'oclock/9'oclock position. Your weight is on the pedals and you are standing up in a "trials riding" position. the most controllable for bikes and motorcycles.
    1981 Nishiki Ultimate
    1977 Nishiki Landau
    1967 Jeunet Captivante track bike
    1951 Claud Butler New Allrounder under construction
    "index shifters = frets on a fiddle"

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