Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    59'er Mariner Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Alexandria, IN
    My Bikes
    LeMond Maillot Jaune, Vintage Trek 520 (1985), 1976 Schwinn Voyageur 2, Miyata 1000 (1985)
    Posts
    3,300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Wheel hub information sought

    I have a Miyata 1000 frame that is currently being built up and I'm going back and forth with the wheel build.

    My first option is to get a set with XT hubs and Mavic A719 hoops. Great price and it looks like a strong wheel but I would have to spread the stays from 126 to 135.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/2007-XT-Mavic-A7...QQcmdZViewItem

    Before I do this, I'm wondering if there is a rear freehub spaced at 126mm for a 36 spoke wheel? It would have to take a 7 speed shimano hyperglide cassette. Perhaps early Dura-Ace? I thought I found one at Harris Cyclery but they just went out of stock.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/hubs-deore-mt60.html

    I'm new to the wheel-building world so any knowledge you can give would be greatly appreciated.

    Edit: I'm using friction bar end shifters and the stock shimano 600 triple crank. I also really like the looks of the Mavic A719 rims so I want to build a new wheelset.

    Thanks,
    Bob
    Last edited by Mariner Fan; 07-06-07 at 11:28 AM.

  2. #2
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,770
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Putting the issue of cold setting to 135mm aside, I'll just say that that's a great deal on the XT/A719 36 spoke wheelset. I paid $229 for mine from the same place, but just make sure you call them and tell them you don't want the disc-compatible hubs (like those shown in the ebay pics). The disc-compatible hubs will work, but they just wouldn't look right on a vintage touring bike. When I called them and told them I wanted 36 DT spokes, XT M760 hubs (silver, non-disc), and silver Mavic A719 rims, they said they had a bunch of wheelsets in stock with that exact spec, they just had different pics up in the ebay ad. Good luck with whatever you decide-

  3. #3
    Senior Member fender1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Berwyn PA
    My Bikes
    I hate bikes!
    Posts
    4,376
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would use the XT wheels if you are on a budget and can live with it not being "correct." Having the frame cold set or doing it yourself is not that big of a deal. You can reverse the cold set if need be in the future.

  4. #4
    59'er Mariner Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Alexandria, IN
    My Bikes
    LeMond Maillot Jaune, Vintage Trek 520 (1985), 1976 Schwinn Voyageur 2, Miyata 1000 (1985)
    Posts
    3,300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've never been correct. Just ask my wife!

    I probably will do the cold set trick but I just wanted to explore all options before going there.

    I just had the frame painted so I'm a bit worried about taking a 2x4 to it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member fender1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Berwyn PA
    My Bikes
    I hate bikes!
    Posts
    4,376
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ah la vintage trek:

    1 2ft piece of all thread

    2 nuts

    2 washers (Placea rag between the washers and the frame

    Set it up with the nuts/washers on the inside of the rear droupouts and the all thread resting in the drop outs.

    Lubricate well and give each side an equal number of turns. I had to go out to almost 160mm to get my 126mm to 133mm for a nexus 8 hub install. Take your time . It was not difficult and a little less "rudimentary" than the sheldon method.

  6. #6
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco California
    My Bikes
    2007 Waterford 953 RS-22
    Posts
    8,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bob, my '87 Paramount has 126 spacing, and uses a Dura-Ace hub with 7-speed Hyperglide cassette. Rims are 36h Mavic MA40.

    - Stan

  7. #7
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,770
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fender1
    It was not difficult and a little less "rudimentary" than the sheldon method.
    I've now "cold set" using both the allthread method and Sheldon's method, and I believe Sheldon's is by far the better method. The key is that you bend one side of the rear triangle at a time with Sheldon's method, if you take your time you can fine tune the alignment down to the millimeter. With the allthread method, you have absolutely no control over how much each side bends individually, and with the extra dimple on the driveside chainstay it's very likely they won't bend equally.

    Particularly in a case like Mariner Fan's, where he'd be cold setting quite a distance (126 to 135), I would advise against the allthread method. You could end up with only one side bending the entire 9mm, whereas with Sheldon's method you would be assured each side bends the same amount. Or if the frame is slightly out of alignment to begin with, you can actually end up with a better aligned frame than you started with by bending each side whatever distance you need to in order to properly align the frame-
    Last edited by well biked; 07-06-07 at 09:14 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pinole, CA, USA
    Posts
    15,040
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I've now "cold set" using both the allthread method and Sheldon's method, and I believe Sheldon's is by far the better method. The key is that you bend one side of the rear triangle at a time with Sheldon's method, if you take your time you can fine tune the alignment down to the millimeter. With the allthread method, you have absolutely no control over how much each side bends individually, and with the extra dimple on the driveside chainstay it's very likely they won't bend equally.

    Particularly in a case like Mariner Fan's, where he'd be cold setting quite a distance (126 to 135), I would advise against the allthread method. You could end up with only side bending the entire 9mm, whereas with Sheldon's method you would be assured each side bends the same amount. Or if the frame is slightly out of alignment to begin with, you can actually end up with a better aligned frame than you started with by bending each side whatever distance you need to in order to properly align the frame-
    I tried the allthread method once and ended up having to straighten out the mess I made using Sheldon's method. I don't think that anyone that tried both methods would ever use the allthread method again.

  9. #9
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,770
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtdrop
    I don't think that anyone that tried both methods would ever use the allthread method again.
    Yep, I used allthread the first time because I thought it seemed crazy to use a 2 x 4, but now that I've done it both ways I've seen the light; I'll never cold set a frame with allthread again. Sheldon's method is the only way to go in my opinion-

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •