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  1. #1
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    Good Touring Frames

    Hi,

    Summer is on, and i have been cruising the yard sales in search of a touring bike. What older cromo touring bikes (70s,80s) should i look for? I know a couple ones, like peugot and fuji, and have kept my eye out for them, but i have also bought mild steel frames before in the thought that they were better (ever heard of a Firenze? don't worry, cr1010 is still useful in a beater bike! http://www.rit.edu/~nab0513/beater.jpg).

  2. #2
    Gordon P
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    Miyata 1000 is a good one.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Bridgestone and some Schwinn
    A quick and reliable guide to bike quality, if the label is unreadable, or unknown, is to check out the rear dropouts. Pressed steel is for cheapo sports bikes, thick investment cast dropouts with moulded features are a sign of a better bike.

  4. #4
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Consider also a late 1970s mid-to-high-end Japanese bike, such as a Nishiki Competition. If you are looking at Peugeots, you should be able to find a nice PR-10 or PKN-10 (d.b. Reynolds 531 main triangle only) at less than a third the price of a comparable PX-10 (chromed stays and full Reynolds 531 stays and forks). The last time I checked, no one had come up with the $100 ante for the fairly clean early 1970s PR-10 on eBay.

    If you want wide tyres, keep to the late 1960s or early 1970s. My 1980 PKN-10 takes 700Cx28, max.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the tips!

  6. #6
    Mr. Cellophane RainmanP's Avatar
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    Many older steel frames seem pretty good for touring. I am especially partial to good lugged steel frames. I have 3, a mid-80s Bianchi Brava, an early 80s Schwinn Voyageur, and a mid 70s Trek. The Schwinn Voyageur was a bonafide loaded touring bike; it even came stock with 40 spoke wheels. Both it and the Trek have longer frames which provides a more comfortable ride because the frame can flex to absorb some shock. Look for extra clearance between the rear tire and the seat tube which indicates not only a longer frame, but also clearance for fenders. Be sure to look for threaded eyelets on the dropouts and stays for mounting racks for panniers.
    Regards,
    Raymond
    If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!

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