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  1. #1
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    Koga-Miyata Terraliner identification

    I have a Koga-Miyata Terraliner that I am trying to date. The serial number is U011159, is a 63c frame, red, lugged, triple-butted and splined steel tubing, canti mounts for 700c, internally routed top-tube brake cable, internally routed down-tube generator wire.

    This frame is NOS, with original touch-up paint (black and red) and has never had any parts mounted. It even still has cardboard tubes protecting the canti bosses from paint, and has a clear plastic sleeve covering the Koga decal on the chain stay.

    If anyone can help me ID the frame, I would appreciate it..

    Karl

  2. #2
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    Based on the serial number, the frame was made in 1992, but it's from late enough in the year that it's in that grey area where it could possibly be a 1993 model.

  3. #3
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    thanks

    You were the one that I hoped would reply...you seem to really know these bikes. A beautiful frame, and should make someone a nice touring ride. Any idea of its worth on ebay? If I cannot get $150 for it I will keep it for myself...but am trying to raise the necessary funds for my own frame jig and have to let the collection go.

  4. #4
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    Trying sending a PM to Elev12K. While I am quite familiar with Miyata, I do not know the European Koga-Miyata models. He is far more knowledgeable with respect to them. Ofhand though, from your description, it sounds to be the equivalent of a Miyata 1000, in which case, I suspect you would get your price.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Elev12k's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Sounds like 1993 TerraLiner. It has "Miyata" on the downtube and "Koga" on the seattube. If so, yes it the the one. Original specs were only Altus(!) and some other decent, but not very sophisticated stuff. I would say it was a bit underspecced for the nice frame.

    The other two TerraLiners for that year were TerraLiner Alloy and TerraLiner Carbolite. Both shared the concept of tubing bonded to neat aluminium lugs, but the 1st being full aluminium and the later having carbon tubing (3 tubes) in the front triangle. The also shared a nice bonded aluminium fork.

    The Alloy was specced with the hybrid specific Shimano 400cx groupset and the Carbolite with 700cx and Syncros/Nitto componentry.

    Those 3 TerraLiners came without fenders, racks, lights etc.

    I had the TerraLiner Carbolite of the 1992 year. I think with bikes like the Klein Adept and the Kuwahara C-Pacer one of the sweetest among all hybrids ever made. Catalogue pic:


    1992 TerraLiner Carbolite with XT, a lot Syncros, SM Titanio. 1992 TLC frame: Hardtlite (steel) stays and fork, aluminium lugs and 4 Carbolite tubes for front triangle.
    official OW 2010 Concours de Elegance jury member

    Visit Wim's vintage Tour the France newspaper resource! >>> www.cyclingpassions.eu

  6. #6
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    thanks!

    I sure appreciate the information and the time you took to post it. Here is the listing for the frame. ebay item # 320179718486

    Karl

  7. #7
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    Hello,


    I have a question about the Koga Miyata Terraliner Carbolite mentioned above.
    I bought it in 1993 and it was from the year before. My bike has performed outstanding over the last 21 years, on many a short trip but also long (up to 4 months) trips, but now I have a problem :-(

    A "small" introduction to me and my bike:
    A few years ago, at the end of my trip from here in Amsterdam to the southern tip of Sicily I decided that the back wheel needed new spokes (first time since 1993!!!). In Palermo I ran into a street full of bike shops. I thought "if there was ever a place to have my wheel done, it's here". The street was lined with men setting up wheels from scratch. Since I love my bike and the hub and rim were still in good condition (Shimano Deore DX FH-M650 hub and a Wolber M59 622/700c) I asked the man in question to re-use these parts. Two hours later I picked up the bike and all was well.


    Last year on a trip through England however, spokes started breaking. We got through our trip, but it was a bit of a pitty. Every time a spoke broke......I had a lot of trouble replacing it. All the other spokes appeared to be glued to the nipples.


    So here we are now. Me and my wife want to go for a two week trip along the coast towards France but I have to do something about this rear wheel. It has been fine for a while but it has been making strange creaking noises the last month. I love cycling and can (sometimes temporarily) fix my bike on most trips BUT my knowledge of parts and different sizes is hopeless.


    With other parts that I replaced in the past year I found out that the bike has become quite ancient (some say retro :-)).


    Do you know what I have to look for? At this stage I would prefer to replace the entire wheel, including rim and hub. I have no idea what to look for. All numbers and sizes are spinning through my head.


    I hope someone can help me and point me in the right direction.


    Kind regards,


    Herman

  8. #8
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Head to a bike shop you trust. Wheel replacement is easy/peasy for them, learning the lingo will take you longer, and subject you to making mistakes/returning parts/hassles.

    Nothing really unique or special about your wheel, but they come in a variety of sizes, rear spacing, rim width, etc.

    General rule of thumb, one spoke breaks = replace it. Several spokes break = replace all of the spokes, or replace the wheel. Often, replacing the wheel is the cheaper option.

    Bike shops have their place. They are typically an excellent place to start/get advice for someone not fluent in bike terminology. Ordering stuff on line is best suited for someone very familiar with all the details and who knows EXACTLY what they need. The savings from buying on line quickly disappear with a few mistakes/returns/hassles. The premium a local shop charges is reasonable given the expertise they provide (and if they cannot provide expertise, find another shop).

    Whatever someone here tells you, you are going to need to take a handful of specific measurements, be coached via on line text, etc. Waste of time when a shop can do it in 30 seconds when they have your bike in front of them.

    Bike is neither retro nor ancient.
    Last edited by wrk101; 08-11-14 at 09:56 AM.

  9. #9
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    Well thank you so much wrk101,

    Usefull information. Nice to know that my wheel is nothing special and that my bicycle is not retro nor ancient. I meant the "ancient/ retro" bit in a sarcastic way.
    I love my bike and have no need for it to be retro.


    I suppose Amsterdam is just a bit different compared to a lot of places. The city is swamped with all kinds of bicycles.
    Already 5 years ago I stared having problems having my bicycle serviced. Most shops are more interested in selling bicycles than servicing them. It wouldn't be a problem if the bicycle was new. The default answer that most shops give me when I ask them to have a look at a problem is: We can make an appointment for over 4 to 6 weeks.
    In the end I decided to go to your run of the mill "city bicycle" repair man and when he had a look at it he said: "I think you should just buy a new bicycle, a carbon frame of that age is bound to fall apart at some stage". (Even though this frame still has a "life long" guarantee). The canals in Amsterdam need to be dredged frequently and the object that really seems to clog up the canals: old (mostly stolen) bicycles.


    With that in mind I decided to turn to this bikeforum.

    Thanks again,
    Herman
    amsterdam bikes.jpg
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/21/wo...-pedaling.html

  10. #10
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hgreeven View Post
    Well thank you so much wrk101,

    Usefull information. Nice to know that my wheel is nothing special and that my bicycle is not retro nor ancient. I meant the "ancient/ retro" bit in a sarcastic way.
    I love my bike and have no need for it to be retro.


    I suppose Amsterdam is just a bit different compared to a lot of places. The city is swamped with all kinds of bicycles.
    Already 5 years ago I stared having problems having my bicycle serviced. Most shops are more interested in selling bicycles than servicing them.
    Actually, no different than here. One shop told me that servicing any bike over 5 years old was a waste of money, as bike technology has changed so much....

    In the end, doing your own work, or as much as you can, is the best answer. Second best answer is a bicycle co-op (see comments later). Third is to check with other shops until you find one more interested in older bikes. Eventually, you will find one that appreciates older bikes. In my area, that is about one shop out of 10 at best.

    Good place to start is Randy Jawa's "mytenspeeds.com" web site, although it focuses more on road bikes than mountain bikes.

    Mountain bike rear wheels come down to a few key pieces of information:

    1. Is is a freewheel or cassette wheel? Totally, completely different technology, and will require two different wheels.

    2. How many speeds on the current freewheel or cassette?

    3. Rear spacing: OLD? Many mountain bikes are 135mm, some are 130mm, really early ones were sometimes 126mm.

    4. Rim width? (will need to remove tire). Realize tire will have to come off regardless, as you will be replacing the wheel.


    Google or Sheldon Brown site will guide you through most of these questions. On measurements, if you measure carefully, a ruler will work.

    Here in the US, people often use bicycle co-ops. These are places where people donate parts and time to help others repair or build up bikes. The one in my area sells new replacement wheels CHEAP, and could help someone answer all the questions above.


    The good news in all of this is it will help educate you about bikes. This will be a life long skill.

    Until you are fluent in all of the bike specific information, my advice is to avoid ordering parts on line! This can be a major headache, as parts don't fit right, you have to return stuff, etc. I am always surprised newbs want to buy everything on amazon.


    In buying a new wheel, be sure to get one with stainless steel spokes. That could cost $5 to $10 more here in the US, well worth it.
    Last edited by wrk101; 08-11-14 at 09:59 AM.

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