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Old 10-25-07, 11:09 AM   #1
phazer08
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Just got a mixte...new to C&V

Hi all. I've just gotten this Raleigh USA mixte that I want to fiddle around with and make a fun ride out of. I'm not looking to keep it in original condition (does that get me booted from here?!). My goals are to learn about fixing up bikes, have a little fun hobby and come out with a fun, ride-able bike.

I know there's a ton I can find on this board, but 2 quick questions to start: I don't have any tools yet. What would be a good starter kit that would include tools useful for the Raleigh. Is there a book you would recommend or should I stick to this site and other websites?

OK...one more question: What Would You Do with it??









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Old 10-25-07, 11:32 AM   #2
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Phazer,

1) books etc. get an older repair manual (like the bicycling ones) which covers pre sti/ergo systems.
they show up on ebay frequently.
The park tool site (see below) has good repair tips, as does Sheldon Browns site
http://sheldonbrown.com/articles.html . Sheldon's site probably has more about vintage bikes
than Park.
2) tools. a good set of small sockets (metric) some cone wrenches, crank puller, bottom bracket pin tools
are a good start. You can check out park tool ( http://www.parktool.com/ ) for a good idea of
some basic tools (and some not so basic tools). Check out the prepackaged kits for an idea of
what you might need.

welcome to BF btw, we're always glad to lend a hand and advise.
As to what to do with it? let your imagination run wild, but for starters, ride it!

Marty
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Old 10-25-07, 11:39 AM   #3
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I know that my husband got me this:

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...6&item=AK%2D37

for a Christmas present last year, and it pretty much fits the bill.

The Park website has some good tips for bike fixing, and also Sheldon Brown's site (there's a sticky in the Bicycle Mechanics forum for Captain Brown's site). Or, what lotek says!

Finally, enjoy!

Welcome to Bike Forums and the wonderful world of Classic & Vintage !

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Old 10-25-07, 12:13 PM   #4
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I took the same exact Raleigh frame and modified it for my wife to look like this:



It's a six-speed now with Planet Bike fenders, WALD front basket, and a few other commuting necessities.

Neal
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Old 10-25-07, 12:31 PM   #5
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Welcome to the 2nd best place on BF!

Where do you want to end up with the bike? Do you want a drop bar road bike, a riser bar hybrid, or a flat bar bomber? Close your eyes and open you mind, let the visualizations appear, keep your mind open to the field of all possibilities. You'll find your answer within.

As lotek mentioned the parktool ans sheldon's are excellent sites.
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Old 10-25-07, 01:08 PM   #6
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I have a Glenns Bicycle Repair book from the 1970s and a Bicycling Magazine Bicycle repair book from ~1990. For modern bikes I have Zinn's Art of Road Bike repair and Zinn's Art of Mountain Bike Repair. The current repair manuals tend to not have much discussion of vintage shifting and braking systems. Also, headsets have changed too.

Get a bike stand to go along with the tools. Blackburn, Minoura (spelling?) and Park all make stands. In addition to the Park tool set that East Hill posted, bike tool kits are available from Pedros, REI and online stores like Bike Nashbar. The Park tools are pretty much the industry standard and are very nicely made. Pedros tools are good also. My kit from REI uses thin, stamped metal but for the little that I do, it has been fine. But if you are going to work on bikes alot it may be worth spending the money on the more expensive sets.

Maureen
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Old 10-25-07, 01:46 PM   #7
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Wow. All very good advice. I have found very little about this actual model. It seems to be Raleigh USA I guess from the mid-80's. Other than curiosity I don't guess it matters that much. Neal, do you know much about it?

hmmm...I can tell that I've gotten myself into this for more than the $50 I paid for the bike. The tools are pricey. and a stand. Oh well, kind of like when I got into biking. The bike purchase was just the start.

BTW...thanks for the welcomes. I've been on BF for about 6 months now, but mainly in the Texas and Women's forums.
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Old 10-25-07, 01:52 PM   #8
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You don't 'need' a stand, I've been managing fine without one so far. But I'd wager they are nice to have.
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Old 10-25-07, 01:57 PM   #9
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A bike stand would be a good investment.I worked on bikes on the floor for years and then finally got one and it's way easier.
As for tools I think you should go down to your hardware store and see if they have any cheap socket sets.Sometimes you can pick one up for under $20.Now they're not very heavy duty but will work fine.Get a set of screw drivers(don't buy cheap ones) A set of metric and standard allen keys,A couple of large adjustable wrenches,a pair of locking pliers,and a hammer.
If you browse the threads you may find answers to questions relevent to your build.If not,don't be shy and ask.There's gotta be someone that's been through the same type of build.
Welcome to C&V and enjoy your Raleigh.
If it was me I would only replace what needed to be.I like my bikes original(yours looks very clean and original).Even if they are a little worn looking like this Raleigh.It's a 1971 Sport with a little rust and the paint is sun faded(to a really neat gold colour).

It's nothing fancy and probably not worth as much the way it is.But I only had to do minimal work to get it ridable and other than the tires(or should I say tyres)the bike is 100% original.It cruises along nicely and use this one as my grocery getter.But that's just me.
There's nothing wrong with building it to suit your tastes.Who knows,you may want to make a fixie out of it.That would be cool too!!You can build it however you like but the important thing is you built it.There's a certain pride to creating the "perfect bike".TBG

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Old 10-25-07, 02:56 PM   #10
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Wow. All very good advice. I have found very little about this actual model. It seems to be Raleigh USA I guess from the mid-80's. Other than curiosity I don't guess it matters that much. Neal, do you know much about it?
You can see the Marathon specs in these two pages from the 1985 Raleigh USA catalog:

http://retroraleighs.com/catalogs/1985/pages/3.html
http://retroraleighs.com/catalogs/19...-marathon.html

That second page shows 27" wheels, but the frame I built up for my wife actually took 700c wheels, so it likely wasn't from that year. I haven't seen later catalogs, so I can't confirm.

Neal
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Old 10-25-07, 03:18 PM   #11
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You can find the year it was built by the date codes on some of the components(derailleur,brakes).Check out this site for info.www.vintage-trek.com/component_dates.htm
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Old 10-25-07, 04:45 PM   #12
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I took the same exact Raleigh frame and modified it for my wife to look like this:



It's a six-speed now with Planet Bike fenders, WALD front basket, and a few other commuting necessities.

Neal

This is my idea of an almost perfect city bike. good job! my only suggestions that would differ from this beautiful setup would be a singlespeed setup(perfect for waco, texas), upside down granny-bars, one brake, and keep those sweet wheel reflectors!!!! oh yeah and HUGE FLAMES. YES!!!!as for tools, it's a raleigh, all you need for tools are 2 hammers, one big, one bigger, a few adjustable wrenches a park 3way allen key #1 bike tool ever made. #1 is have fun with whatever you do with it and ride it
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Old 10-25-07, 06:29 PM   #13
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Thanks, Neal. I thought I had checked thru that...but there it was.

Good thoughts g-funk (hmm...except for maybe the flames). I'll have to look up 'granny bars.' Oh...and if your tongue is in your check when you say anything (like "keep those sweet wheel reflectors!!!!") you'll have to tell me, cuz I won't get it. and good advice on the starter tools. Would a trainer work for a stand for now?

TBG - not sure about a fixie. maybe just a single-speed.

I need to get some tools and call in sick to work!

First thing to figure out: how to raise the seat post.
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Old 10-25-07, 08:05 PM   #14
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You can find the year it was built by the date codes on some of the components(derailleur,brakes).Check out this site for info.www.vintage-trek.com/component_dates.htm

Better yet, post the serial number and we can probably date it that way. It would also be nice to know if there is a country of origin decal and what it says.
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Old 10-25-07, 09:36 PM   #15
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no I'm serious about those wheel reflectors, they are the sweetest. they make that bike look superfast. if you don't want them PM me and I'll give you my address because I want them. as far as the bars I like to run the north road style bars upside down for a more aggressive position and I think they look cool, kinda like the old clubman bikes. I think that was the birth of moustache bars.
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Old 10-26-07, 08:21 AM   #16
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Ah. Well, they were very carefully packaged with the bike. I'll keep them for now. I'll look into those bars...do you have a pic you can link to?
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Old 10-26-07, 09:06 AM   #17
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"I'm not looking to keep it in original condition"
Make it yours by judicious improvements. The hubs/wheelset and brakes/pads are a good place to start.
One of my favorite rides is this Motobecane Grand Jubile. I built it up from a mid 70s frame & fork. The Mavic hubs and New Old Stock Shimano 600 crank & derailleurs complement the Nervex lugs. Later, I added Giles Berthaud Stainless Steel fenders & a Brooks saddle. The latest modification was a Stronglight triple crankset with Lyotard platform pedals. Don
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Old 10-26-07, 09:19 AM   #18
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I know that my husband got me this:

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...6&item=AK%2D37

for a Christmas present last year, and it pretty much fits the bill.

The Park website has some good tips for bike fixing, and also Sheldon Brown's site (there's a sticky in the Bicycle Mechanics forum for Captain Brown's site). Or, what lotek says!

Finally, enjoy!

Welcome to Bike Forums and the wonderful world of Classic & Vintage !

East Hill
Not to get too personal, but do you know how much that set cost? I might have to put it on my Christmas list depending on how much money is involved.

Thanks,
-Bill
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Old 10-26-07, 09:30 AM   #19
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How does a mixte ride compared with other frame designs? That bike looks really sharp from here.
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Old 10-26-07, 09:39 AM   #20
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OK...one more question: What Would You Do with it??
Doll it up with a Brooks saddle, gumwall tires, upright bars, and aluminum fenders!

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Old 10-26-07, 09:43 AM   #21
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Not to get too personal, but do you know how much that set cost? I might have to put it on my Christmas list depending on how much money is involved.

Thanks,
-Bill
I believe that the set Mr. East Hill got was around $300--there are far cheaper sets, though. He got me that one because I have so many bikes, and figured I needed something heavy duty.

As to the ride of a mixte--the mixtes have a much more 'open' feel to them. Even though mine have drop handlebars, I don't bend over as much as on a diamond frame bike, so the riding style is a bit more upright. It's actually quite pleasant for my back. People have said that they flex more, but I have never noticed that. It's also nice not to have to worry about those top tubes during sudden stops .

East Hill
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Old 10-26-07, 10:37 AM   #22
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reply to question about trainer stand/bike stand.

Yes, one of those bike trainers will work to hold up the rear wheel also and if you have one I would start using that and spend the money on some basic tools. The trainer or stand is useful when you are trying to adjust the shifters and deraillers and brakes because it will hold the rear wheel up while you turn the crank with one hand and shift through the gears or apply the brakes with the other hand.

As for the price of tool kits, they vary. The cheaper one that I got from REI was less than $70, but as I mentioned above, the wrenches are made of thin stamped metal. On the other hand, the alan wrenches in the kit are fine. I bought the REI kit and then supplimented it with select tools from Park, as needed. Most repair manuals will have a list of tools in the front of the book that you can look through and buy as needed.
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Old 10-26-07, 10:59 AM   #23
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Ah. Well, they were very carefully packaged with the bike. I'll keep them for now. I'll look into those bars...do you have a pic you can link to?
every handle bar on this page, except the drop bars currently on your bike counts, in my messed up book, as granny bars.you can go to your local bike shop and ask for 3-speed style handlebars and they should be able to help. get aluminum ones not steel. you'll also need new brake lever or levers. I'd recommend going online and looking for weinmann or dia compe levers. like these:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWA:IT&ih=011 from my experience they stop good and look very retro and clean.

this is the style of cruiser/commuter I like, one has upright bars and the others are flipped over. both of these bikes need fenders like these:

http://www.velo-orange.com/veor46smfe.html
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Old 10-26-07, 11:19 AM   #24
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Mixte bikes are great for us geezers also. I had one for a while & the step thru design let me start riding again only a few days after some abdominal surgery. One of my co-workers spotted me riding around town while I was on sick leave "recovering" from the surgery, so I received a lot of ribbing when I returned to work. Don
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Old 10-26-07, 12:04 PM   #25
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A bike stand would be a good investment.I worked on bikes on the floor for years and then finally got one and it's way easier.
+1

I made do without a stand for a couple of years, not to mention proper tools. When I finally broke down and spent some of my hoarded flip money on a stand and some bike specific tools, my little world got a whole lot brighter in a hurry. I got by without one, but I'm a bike-fixin' demon with one. It makes things A LOT easier.

You gotta have a stand. And more importantly, you gotta choose wisely.... I went through 2 "bargain" Performance stands until I really broke down and bought a decent one. At least Performance accepted the return of their cheap stands cheerfully, but lesson learned - get a good one.

As far as tools - since I used to work exclusively on vintage bikes, I didn't buy a prepackaged tool "kit". I elected to buy tools onsie-twosie, as needed. BB tools, metric hex key set, offset box wrenches (8,9,10mm being most used), cone wrenches, freewheel removal tools, chain breaker, etc. I'm sure I spent a lot more that way, but it was spread out over a year or two....
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