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  1. #1
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
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    Width of Campy Record rear hub flanges constant through dropout inflation?

    I need to replace my Campagnolo Record rear hub, 1984 vintage. I have everything but the hub shell itself in good shape. I'm wondering if the shell from an earlier Campy hub (Record, Tipo or Gran Sport) made for 120 mm dropout spacing would work acceptably to rebuild the wheel as it was, with 126 mm spacing.

    In other words, did all the hubs have pretty much the same flange spacing, relative to wheel centerline, and distance from drive-side flange to freewheel seat? That would mean that the only difference was in spacer and locknut widths. For reference, the flanges on my broken hub are 57 mm center-to-center, and the freewheel seat is 7mm off the drive-side flange center.

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Old Skeptic stronglight's Avatar
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    Yes. They remained exactly the same for many, many years. What differed was only the spacers on the axle.

  3. #3
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    Record hub shells aka Nuovo Record, Super Record, even 50th anniv. are dimensionally the same. Tipos are a wee bit different, the races are pressed not ground and the internal dimensions are a small amount off, you could easliy correct for the change, but if you want a direct fit, stay in the same family.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by stronglight View Post
    Yes. They remained exactly the same for many, many years. What differed was only the spacers on the axle.

    And the axle got longer.

  5. #5
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the advice.
    Quote Originally Posted by repechage View Post
    Record hub shells aka Nuovo Record, Super Record, even 50th anniv. are dimensionally the same. Tipos are a wee bit different, the races are pressed not ground and the internal dimensions are a small amount off, you could easliy correct for the change, but if you want a direct fit, stay in the same family.
    I don't understand what "ground" races are, as opposed to "pressed." Does this mean that I can't pop the races out of my broken hub and press them (or have someone with the right tools press them) into the Nuovo Tipo hubs I just bought on eBay? I won't have to do that if the bearings are good, of course; but if not. . .

    I assume that all the Campagnolo axle cones (such as the ones off my Record hub) will fit any of their races -- correct or not?

    I bid on a solo rear Record hub this afternoon, but after being the first bidder, with starting price $25 and no other bids at 2 minutes, things went ballistic in final seconds, and the thing went for about $80 -- way more than I was willing to fork over. It was high-flange with flat skewer, though.

  6. #6
    Senior Member cyclotoine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
    Thanks all for the advice.

    I don't understand what "ground" races are, as opposed to "pressed." Does this mean that I can't pop the races out of my broken hub and press them (or have someone with the right tools press them) into the Nuovo Tipo hubs I just bought on eBay? I won't have to do that if the bearings are good, of course; but if not. . .
    Unfortunately no, the races are not interchangable. The dimensions are different, I think the record are smaller. The difference in quality is obvious when you look at them. I had the same idea as I want to restore a TIPO hub and upgrade to record races... well I found out they are not interchangeable. Anyway, if you need a low flange record rear hubshell I can probably help you out. I think I have a lone 36 hole shell around here I can send you for a very reasonable price. PM me if you are interested.
    1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear

  7. #7
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
    I need to replace my Campagnolo Record rear hub, 1984 vintage. I have everything but the hub shell itself in good shape. ...
    It sounds as though we have the same problem. I have a circa 1970 Campagnolo Record low-flange hub whose spoke holes have elongated and otherwise deformed through some 30k mi / 50k km of riding and at least three different rebuilds with various lacing patterns.* The axle and the bearing surfaces are still near-pristine.

    ___
    * When rebuilding a wheel, keep the original lacing pattern.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gary Fountain's Avatar
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    A pressed bearing race is formed from a flat sheet of steel. The sheet of steel is pushed into a 'hole' by a 'punch'. The bearing race takes the form of the punch.

    A ground bearing race starts its life as a cylindrical piece of steel. It goes through a number of processes that turn it into a bearing. The bearing surface is ground into the steel blank by a 'Cylindrical Grinding Machine'. This process is extremely accurate as opposed to the pressed bearing process.

    A ground bearing will produce much less friction than a pressed bearing.

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