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Old 12-10-07, 09:17 PM   #1
SoreFeet
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forgive the repost need more opinions: Yellow jersey tubulars any good?

I am doomed to tubular tires. I can't seem to justify spending more money on cycling goods. Last bike swap I was gifted a pair of campagnolo low flange hubs laced to wolber super champions for the paltry sum of 10$

I think the Dugast silks would be great but I make peasant wages. The Yellow Jersey tires seem to be a pretty good bet considering I paid 50$ or a single continental clincher at my local bike shop. I could have got them discounted on-line but wanted to do my civic duty and support a mom and pop store...

The local mom and pop stores only sell crappy 40$ hutchinson tubulars or 65-100$ continentals....I noticed that the hyped Vittoria EVO are made in Thailand...well so are the yellow jersey tires but the do not feature higher TPI content...I think 120 or so TPI is adequate...

So how do the yellow jersey tires hold up? It seems that repairing a tubular flat is overly hyped to be complex and impossible. So I cut the basetape, pull the tube, patch it and stitch it....sew it up big woop...

I'm thinking that for 100$ I get 6 tires...not a bad deal. I hope to god the yellow jersey tires stay that price. On a side note I do have some vintage clement silks that hold air but the tread has some cracks...Should I glue em and ride em for the helluva it?
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Old 12-10-07, 09:27 PM   #2
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I got some cheap Conti's at Performance for under $25. Use coupons and wait for sales. For my good tubies I buy at Texas Cyclesport. They run specials from time to time. I got some Veloflex Crits this past Fall for $65. Right now they have Conti GP 4000's for $65(Code BM-7) ends tonight at midnight, TX time).

Nice guys, easy to work with and quick to handle problems if they arise. (No connection, just a happy, repeat customer).
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Old 12-10-07, 09:30 PM   #3
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The Servizo Corsa tires are hard to get on straight and usually don't sit flat at the valve stem. But for everyday riding they make a lot of sense. The price of good tubulars have really driven me to clinchers lately.
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Old 12-10-07, 11:15 PM   #4
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The Servizo Corsa tires are hard to get on straight and usually don't sit flat at the valve stem. But for everyday riding they make a lot of sense. The price of good tubulars have really driven me to clinchers lately.
+1 on the Servizio Corse comments. They ride okay.
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Old 12-10-07, 11:46 PM   #5
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I've been riding nothing but Vittoria Rallye's 700-23 for the past two years and are quite happy with them. Performance sells them at $29.95 regular/$24.95 at periodic sale, although I've discovered La Bicicletta on eBay sells the same tyre 2 for $39.00 plus $10.00 shipping.
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Old 12-11-07, 06:32 AM   #6
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Money is tight and you are signing up to ride sew ups. You would be better off investing in quality clinchers with latex tubes, 99% of the ride and 10% of the hassle imo.
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Old 12-11-07, 07:45 AM   #7
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Money is tight and you are signing up to ride sew ups. You would be better off investing in quality clinchers with latex tubes, 99% of the ride and 10% of the hassle imo.
True, but quality clinchers w/latex tubes cost about the same as good tubulars, and decent wheels sets probably command more for a clincher than for a tubular, at least that's been my experience. The OP said he has a set of decent tubular rims that cost all of $10! Try to find Campagnolo hubs laced to clinchers for $10!
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Old 12-11-07, 09:02 AM   #8
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i dont' really like rally's.
i've heard the vittora evo cx tires (and all the variations) are very nice...almost as nice as the veloflex criterium.
i ordered a vredestein tubular, the lower priced one, 28.95 from bike tires direct but haven't glued it on yet. i can't comment on the ride at this time but the tire is rolling pretty nice at pressure on the rim i have it stretching on. i was told that the QC of vredestein can be a bit hit or miss though...
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Old 12-11-07, 09:48 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
Money is tight and you are signing up to ride sew ups. You would be better off investing in quality clinchers with latex tubes, 99% of the ride and 10% of the hassle imo.
The dilema here for us "period correct" folks is finding suitable narrow 700c clincher rims for a 70's or early 80's bike. Polished Mod E's and Rigida 1320's are really tough to find these days and go for big bucks on ebay. I've come to the point where I'm going to try and de-anodize and polish some gray MA 40's that already have the dreaded sidewall brake pad motif.

And before you say it. To me modern Open Pros (as great a rim as they are) look like vomit on an old bike. Sun's look kind of thick and cheap to me as well.
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Old 12-11-07, 06:24 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
I am doomed to tubular tires. I can't seem to justify spending more money on cycling goods. Last bike swap I was gifted a pair of campagnolo low flange hubs laced to wolber super champions for the paltry sum of 10$

I think the Dugast silks would be great but I make peasant wages. The Yellow Jersey tires seem to be a pretty good bet considering I paid 50$ or a single continental clincher at my local bike shop. I could have got them discounted on-line but wanted to do my civic duty and support a mom and pop store...

The local mom and pop stores only sell crappy 40$ hutchinson tubulars or 65-100$ continentals....I noticed that the hyped Vittoria EVO are made in Thailand...well so are the yellow jersey tires but the do not feature higher TPI content...I think 120 or so TPI is adequate...

So how do the yellow jersey tires hold up? It seems that repairing a tubular flat is overly hyped to be complex and impossible. So I cut the basetape, pull the tube, patch it and stitch it....sew it up big woop...

I'm thinking that for 100$ I get 6 tires...not a bad deal. I hope to god the yellow jersey tires stay that price. On a side note I do have some vintage clement silks that hold air but the tread has some cracks...Should I glue em and ride em for the helluva it?
The vintage Clements are worth a try, but they have significant value as they are, would be a shame to damage them.

I've ridden teh Conti Giros and Vittoria Rallyes and like both. My friend in the local Vintage scene swears by the Servizio Corse. All these are made in Thailand as far as i can tell, and the casings and base tapes really look identical. The modern Giros and rallyes do go on straight with moderate care, not like the Giros of 15 years ago. I had great original latex D'Allessandros on a bike of ancient days, and while yes it's a great supple ride, these modern tires are pretty good.

One other local vintage guy uses Veloflex Paves with latex tubes, and while he loves the ride, it's a $65 at least tire with a $10 + tube, and good modern rims are around $65 each (Velocity Aerohead or Mavic). If you want to stay cheap, build on your $10 tubulars. Keep them true and well-shod. Dang, $5 per wheel and less than $20 per tire! You can even afford to buy a freewheel!

The only issue is how do you fix a flat. First answer is, AT HOME, not on the road. To get home, you carry an extra tire and install it at the roadside. Repairing at home needs good instructions, and Lennard Zinn has published a good set of info in his book, "Cycling Primer." He also has a clean, orderly , low-mess, secure method of gluing tubulars to rims.

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Old 12-11-07, 06:28 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
I am doomed to tubular tires. I can't seem to justify spending more money on cycling goods. Last bike swap I was gifted a pair of campagnolo low flange hubs laced to wolber super champions for the paltry sum of 10$

So how do the yellow jersey tires hold up? It seems that repairing a tubular flat is overly hyped to be complex and impossible. So I cut the basetape, pull the tube, patch it and stitch it....sew it up big woop...

?
BTW, Don't Cut the Basetape! Pull it off, working to break the glue seam carefully. I cut one based on John Forester's instructions, and that tire has never been the same. Get some liquid rubber or carpet glue to re-attach the base tape if'n it doesn't want to stick.

Road Fan, tubular fan for life.
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Old 12-11-07, 07:40 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
Money is tight and you are signing up to ride sew ups. You would be better off investing in quality clinchers with latex tubes, 99% of the ride and 10% of the hassle imo.
That's odd. It's probably because I grew up with tubulars back in the 70's and rode them exclusively back then, but for roadside changes, give me a tubular any day. I find them a lot easier to work with, rather than struggling with tyre irons by the side of the road. And modern 700c clinchers are a real hassle compared to the old 27x1-1/4's. Therefore, I stay with the old technology, get 100% of the ride, and find bloody little hassle.

Now, I do have my backup down to a method. My clincher bikes (both tourers, Magneet and Bianchi - and sometimes I swap wheels on the Fuji) each have a wedge pack under the seat with three tyre irons and a tube permanently installed. Each tubular bike has a spare tyre strapped under the seat when riding. In my jersey pocket is the little tool kit: tyre gauge, rim cement, two skintight latex gloves, and a CO2 inflater. That goes with me on every ride, along with my wallet and cell phone. The tourers have frame pumps, which I prefer to use, and I'm always on the lookout for pumps for the other frames. The big tool kit (actual wrenches, screwdrivers, etc.) only go with me on the tourers when I've got the bags attached.

So far, I've never been stranded. And have had very few flats. I'm a firm believer in Murphy's Law, and found long ago that it can be defeated with a properly pessimistic, fatalistic attitude.
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