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Old 12-24-07, 03:01 AM   #1
maldekai
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Peugeot U0-8, could it be worth $40?

HELLO! I AM NEW TO THIS HOLY BICYCLE COMPENDIUM! I am amazed at the extent to which this website has captured all that is bicycles and cycling. Thanks for the great site and awesome community!

I am in a predicament. I have been itching to turn a U0-8 into a fixie for sometime. I prefer the angles of the tubes of this frame of this bike over any other. I live in Hawaii, and so these aren't as abundant as they are on the mainland. I found this one on craigslist, and the guy wants $40.

I have done some research and found that complete, ok-condition bicycles of this make usually aren't worth more than $20. Any suggestions? I mean, its not like I don't have $40, but I would need to replace the pedals, brakes, chain, chainring, spider, rear hub, tires and respoke both wheels.

Shipping from the mainland sucks, so that is out of the question...

Should I bite my thumb at this guy and try to haggle? I haven't seen many on island, however, so I feel like I shouldn't risk it.
BTW, there is no left pedal.




I think I will ultimately give in and just buy it, because I am new to the bike community here and don't have any connections to shops or anything. I think I love this bike too much to pass it up.

How badly am I getting ripped off at $40?
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Old 12-24-07, 03:03 AM   #2
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i wouldnt pay for it. but thats just me talkin
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Old 12-24-07, 03:10 AM   #3
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That would sell in a nanosecond for $100 in Portland.
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Old 12-24-07, 04:42 AM   #4
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I find it hard to believe that the seller really expects to get $40 for that POS. That looks like one of those bikes that the guy had in college and has been sitting around ever since, probably in the back yard. His wife finally lost it and told him to get rid of it or she was throwing it in the trash. Unless Hawaii has recently gone fixie crazy, like Portland, I think he will jump on $20.
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Old 12-24-07, 05:36 AM   #5
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I have to admit I have a fondness for French bikes. That one is roughly 30 years old, the frameset appears to be in surprisingly good cosmetic condition (especially considering the humidity and salty sea air, etc.), and it would be a natural for a fixed gear, or could even look nice restored as a 10-speed...

BUT... basically everything apart from the frame is shot and would need to be replaced. So, you would need a new bottom bracket [french thread] a headset [French thread]... seatpost is probably 24 mm (yes, Really!) which is hard to find...uh... that is, if that one is not already fused into the neglected frame, a new stem would be 22.0 mm, again an uncommon size... and again, if it is not fused into the steering tube. So, at best you would be getting a difficult to re-fit frameset which very well may even have a nightmares worth of concealed "issues". So, I would pass on it, and let someone else in search of a MAJOR labor of love take on what I suspect will be an overly expensive and long term project.

I suspect that in Hawaii you may have access to a great many very nice quality Japanese steel framesets which might be MUCH easier to deal with... and perhaps even be able to ride within a reasonable amount of time and without going broke or insane.

Your call, but I'd expect the worst from a bike which appears to have been left out in the elements for too many years. If you find that the seatpost and stem are removable, you might take a chance, and you could always sell the frameset alone on eBay for enough to recover your $40 (shipping cost abroad would be more attractive for the frameset alone, anyway). That is, if you either gave up on finding the awkward replacement components or the expense involved.
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Old 12-24-07, 05:39 AM   #6
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Considering your options $40 is probably OK. Thats an AO8 not a UO8. The brakes and rims have been changed to more modern pieces....

Jim

Some good early Peugeot info can be found on Toms site:

http://retropeugeot.com/

And more more modern stuff on my site:

http://retropeugeot.com/
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Old 12-24-07, 07:58 AM   #7
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Important, view the bike first hand. Check the head and bottom bracket. If they are fused from rust, I would walk away. If not I would buy it. That is one beautiful color. I've not seen that color on a Peugeot, but I'm not a French bike fan. As for the BB replacement, see Sheldon Brown's article on replacing a French cottered crank & BB with english, cotterless, square taper.
But I wouldn't touch it if the head OR the bb are frozen from rust.
EDIT: That chain is off the dr and rusted, it may be difficult to check the bb to see if it's rusted in place.
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Old 12-24-07, 09:36 AM   #8
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1) Inspect for rust, per roccobike's advice.
2) Read SheldonBrown on French bike restoration.
3) Make sure you have a source of parts, including eBay, if you are patient.
4) If he is asking $40, he will probably accept less -- try $25.

The 72-degree parallel frame angles and the long wheelbase do make for a stable, comfortable ride, although I find the steering a little too slow even for my tastes. I put a shorter-rake fork on my UO-8, but now I have a bit of toe-to-tire overlap, which is generally not a problem, the CPSC notwithstanding.

By the way, those sidepull brake calipers are definitely not an upgrade from the original MAFAC centerpulls!
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Old 12-24-07, 09:47 AM   #9
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I would most likely offer 20$ around here. It needs a lot of real work. If you know how to do it and can deal with all the wierd french issues( I swear thay just did stuff to be anoying) than get it. I you are going to need a shop to do the work It will cost a lot more than its worth.
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Old 12-24-07, 09:51 AM   #10
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It would be free around here.
Waaay to much rust.
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Old 12-24-07, 09:59 AM   #11
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If the current owner tucked a couple of rolled up twenty dollar bills into the handle bars it's worth the forty bucks.
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Old 12-24-07, 10:00 AM   #12
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The paint is pretty decent. Is it just me or does it look like it has hit something in the past? Should be fixable though.
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Old 12-24-07, 10:21 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
By the way, those sidepull brake calipers are definitely not an upgrade from the original MAFAC centerpulls!
I guess I should have said 'modern' vs. 'upgrade'

In reality if you look at the full side pic its not too bad. Most of that rust is on the surface.


OK..after re-evaluating I'd pass unless you want it for the frame and brakes only. Both wheels are shot...lots of broken spokes!!!!

Its worth frame value only!!!
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Old 12-24-07, 11:47 AM   #14
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Looks like a bargain to me, with considerable upgrades from original parts.

Note, however, that the front brake doesn't appear to reach, so you'll need a new front brake caliper.

You might find this amusing: http://sheldonbrown.com/carapace.html#uo8

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Old 12-24-07, 11:51 AM   #15
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As a reference:

$123

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Peugeot-...QQcmdZViewItem
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Old 12-24-07, 11:54 AM   #16
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I think the e-bay one is/or was an AE-8 Though.

To the O.P., if I ran across that, I'd try and talk him down to $30, and probably end up paying the $40 if he diddn't bite.. All the french thread stuff is still there and the paint is pretty decent.
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Old 12-24-07, 12:00 PM   #17
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I wouldn't buy it with the intent on building it up from scratch, it's not that great a frame and you can't find inexpensive parts to throw on it. New BB and headset are out of the question. I built up a PSV-10 for my girlfriend's dad and lucked out on the thing being practically never rode.

If it were in near perfect condition or was a better model, it would be well worth $40 or more.
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Old 12-24-07, 12:05 PM   #18
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I would most likely offer 20$ around here. It needs a lot of real work. If you know how to do it and can deal with all the wierd french issues( I swear thay just did stuff to be anoying) than get it.
The French stubbornly clung to hard metric dimensions, such as 35mm x 1mm threading on the bottom bracket instead of 1-3/8" x 24 TPI, 14mm x 1.25mm threading instead of 9/16" = 14.3mm x 20 TPI pedal shafts, 28.0mm OD seat tubes instead of 28.6mm = 1-1/8", and 22.0mm stems instead of 22.2mm = 7/8". It is ironic that French bicycle dimensions are the "obsolete" or "nonstandard" ones in an increasingly metric world. The best choice for an international bottom bracket standard was Swiss (correct anticlockwise threading of the fixed cup, metric dimensions), but it was also the least common, so it lost out, and future generations will be scratching their heads over 24 TPI threading.

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I you are going to need a shop to do the work It will cost a lot more than its worth.
That is really the bottom line. Lots of good do-it-yourself projects become financially unrealistic when you have to hire someone to do the work for you.
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Old 12-24-07, 12:45 PM   #19
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GASP* sheldon brown responded to my thread! (I am giddy with excitement!)

Thank you all so much for the great advise. I am going to purchase the frame, but offer $25 at most for the reasons posted above. I really do want a project bike, and I have the resources to get all of the parts I need (ebay, 2 great LBS and a bunch of snobby but very helpful gear heads). If I CAN find more complete Peugeots here, I will gladly snatch them up, but for now, I will succumb to my shallow aesthetic desires and purchase this frame.

I will either be humbled by this experience or be enriched. Either way, I will learn.

Thanks again,
-Mal
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Old 12-24-07, 01:03 PM   #20
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I am having a bear of a time distinguishing between the U0-8 and the A0-8.
http://retropeugeot.com/
Retro Peugeot has pics and specs for both, but I think I am missing some fundamental difference between the two.

I will be trying to decipher the specs for the next day or two
Thanks again all!
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Old 12-24-07, 01:52 PM   #21
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Just in case you need inspiration, this is one I rescued and made workable in singlespeed form (still incomplete in picture). It has become one of my favorite rides and I have more plans for it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg uo8large.jpg (93.9 KB, 59 views)
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Old 12-24-07, 01:55 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maldekai View Post
I am having a bear of a time distinguishing between the U0-8 and the A0-8.
http://retropeugeot.com/
Retro Peugeot has pics and specs for both, but I think I am missing some fundamental difference between the two.

I will be trying to decipher the specs for the next day or two
Thanks again all!

There are no fundamental differences. Lots of small differences, yes.

Frame and forks are more or less the same with the 'U' series having a half chrome fork.

The 'U' series has large flange hubs with quick releases whereas the 'A' series has small flange hubs and wing nuts.

'O' is the base model
'E' throws in fenders and a rack
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Old 12-24-07, 02:14 PM   #23
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Just poking through my 74 catalog, the main differences I see is the lack of chrome on the lower fork ends and lack of an outer chainguard ring on the AO-8 model. Otherwise, Peugeot really had used the same basic frame for many different models.

They sometimes just added more braze-ons - for perhaps a rear generator for lights, or seat stay bosses for a rack, and on some models vertically drilling the rear brake bridge for direct mounting factory installed stainless steel fenders. Certain models also got their premium galvanizing base coat to resist rust if paint was chipped.

To give you an idea how versitile those frames were, here are some photos of one of my variations built on the same basic chassis, in this case, set up originally as a 650-B wheel bike by using factory installed ultra-long-reach brakes in place of the standard center-pulls and with chromed steel front and rear racks and stainless fenders, and generator powered front and rear lighting. This would have been the Cadillac Sedan de Ville among Peugeots, built for comfort and with all the frills... Yeah, it also weighs as much as a Cadillac, but it rides like one too. Peugeot PX-50

By the way, the graphics look exactly like those shown in the 74 catalog, but they were really basically the same for a few years during the mid 70s. If you get the bike, we hope to see some photos (hint, hint) when you get it finally built up.

Before you toss the wheels check the center of the hubs and also the rims which may have small date code markings (usually sets of 2 to 4 tiny strange numbers or letters). Same with any components. Just take accurate notes of anything you see and we may be able to give you a very good idea of the bike's age.

Good Luck!
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Old 12-24-07, 02:45 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redneckwes View Post
the paint is pretty decent.
Which is why it would easily sell for $100 in Portland. Remember, the O.P.'s goal is to convert this to a fixie, and this bike is a great candidate: A classic French bike, low end so it's both inexpensive and not a collector (i.e., converting it to fixie won't be sacrilegious), frame and paint in excellent condition, parts that will be discarded anyway are in deplorable condition (although I just noticed that the RD is Cyclone-- not low-end at all!).

It's a no-brainer in fixie-crazy Portland.

Last edited by Blue Order; 12-24-07 at 02:58 PM.
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Old 12-24-07, 02:56 PM   #25
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I just noticed the dual eyelets on the fork. This bike would be a great candidate for another Portland trend, the Porteur. It has accomodations for fenders front and rear, plus a front rack. I'm seeing more and more of these under Portland messengers (although they never really use the front rack-- never let it be said that messengers can't pose with the best of them). Could even be single speed or fixed, although the fixed gears generally have track pretensions.
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