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Old 12-25-07, 01:15 PM   #1
divineAndbright 
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new 700c tires for old rims?

Does anyone know of any new tires that for sure will fit good on old rims? By that I mean they are easy to get on and off. I dont know if its just me and have bad luck, but every old rim I have the tires can give you a hernia just trying to get them on, not to mention very hard to prevent puncturing the tube. I remember I got a flat while on a ride once and it took a good 30 minutes just to get the new tire on the rim as I was being so cautious not to wreck my tube. I guess old rims are a mm or two bigger in diameter than new ones, or the rim itself is wider or something, I dont know.

I have a few old michelin tires which go on nicely, but Id rather not use them cause they kinda turned hard with age, so they kinda suck to ride on.
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Old 12-25-07, 01:29 PM   #2
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Well, I run Panaracer Pasela wire-beads w/Tourguard on medium width Rigida rims on the Bottecchia with no problems. The Rigidas are 16mm inside width/25mm outside give or take with the "semi-hook" or buldge rather than a true modern hook and I run 28mm tires right now. No problem getting them on or off.

The Paselas are not my favorites for looks but they are functional, flat-resistant, have tan sidewalls, and most importantly, are available new in a variety of sizes.
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Old 12-25-07, 02:24 PM   #3
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you didn't give any details as to the model and size of your rims.

I use wolber alpine rims from the 1980's....and just put some michelin krylion carbon tires on them. No problem. Sweet ride too.
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Old 12-25-07, 02:48 PM   #4
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Well, ive got some ambrosia durexs, FIR, Araya, titans... all from the 80s. It doesnt seem to matter which rim, tires won't go on 'em well just the same.
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Old 12-26-07, 07:29 AM   #5
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Panaracer Pasela are sort of my go-to tire since they ride nice, are cheap, easy to get on and off, come in lots of sizes and provide good traction over a variety of surfaces. Have used Michelin Speedium and Continental Ultra Sport with good results. No longer buy Hutchinsons as some of them I've used really fit tight on the old bikes I ride. Have some Schwalbes that came with white walls I used on a winter bike with good tread; not the lightest or cushiest ride but I don't worry about flats or even carry repair gear with that bike.
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Old 12-26-07, 07:46 AM   #6
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I shudder to ask this (please, no offense intended) but are you putting 700c tires on 27-inch rims? I also have 700c rims from the 80s. I've run probably a dozen or more modern tires on them over the years, and the only set I've not been able to mount with my thumbs have been Continental's cyclocross tires.
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Old 12-26-07, 08:28 AM   #7
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Gross generalizations, but in my experience I've just noticed some pretty basic differences:

1.) Folding tires seem easier to mount, although often harder to seat correctly (evenly).
2.) I usually use wire bead tires rather than folding, and these are commonly one level more difficult to mount than the Kevlar bead folding tires of the same models.
3.) If you want even tougher fits... cheaper, heavier, tires tend to have thicker and stiffer sidewalls too, so some bargain-buy tires such as Performance/Nashbar house-brand tires seem to give me more trouble than others.
4.) If you REALLY want to build up some muscles or bend tire irons, try the Specialized "Armadillo" tires with the red bands. I believe they are one step above non-pneumatic solid rubber tires and feel about as harsh riding as a wooden wagon wheel with a steel strip for a tread. These are the ones usually passed on to the newest bike shop employees to struggle with. They may last for 3000 miles and rarely suffer a puncture. But, if they ever do, I hope you believe in divine intervention...
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Old 12-26-07, 08:57 AM   #8
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I've learned what it means to struggle with installing tires as a result of having a set of the Sun CR-18 650B rims, which were produced a tad too large. But after breaking a few tire irons and a quick stick, my newest friend is a VAR high-pressure tire lever (Item #VR-425 at www.biketoolsetc.com). No pinched tubes, mounts even the tightest tires.

Neal
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Old 12-26-07, 09:16 AM   #9
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If you want easy on and off, you do not want the combination on my Bianchi: Campagnolo Omega rims with Continental tires. I carry three steel tire levers -- I cannot get by with two, as with every other bike I have ever owned, and aluminum and plastic levers are out of the question. In contrast, I never even carry tire levers with my mountain bike.
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Old 12-26-07, 04:17 PM   #10
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These are the Specialized brand tires which get my vote as toughest mounting tire - regardless of what rim is used. Plus, the recommended pressure for 25 mm is 115-125 psi but even at 95 psi they ride with all the comfort of solid hard rubber wheels on a shopping cart. Think in terms of early bone-shaker velocipede.

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Old 12-26-07, 05:50 PM   #11
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The most difficulty I've ever had mounting a tire was a 23mm Bontrager (kevlar) on a Campy Proton wheel. My brother and I broke many tire levers trying to mount it, and once mounted it was so tight you couldn't even wiggle it around to make sure the tube wasn't caught under the bead anywhere. So every time we inflated the tire it would go flat within minutes from being pinched. As a result those wheels have never been used. My brother also has a set of wheels with early '90s Campy rims and they are almost as bad. Is it a Campy wheel thing?

I've found the easiest tires to mount by far are Panaracer Paselas, and I also prefer the way they ride to any other tires I've tried. And don't forget, skinny tires are usually harder to mount than wider ones. I've never mounted a 23mm tire without at least a decent amount of effort and trouble, but 32mm Paselas are almost always a breeze. And 26 x 1.75" Paselas almost mount themselves. I do have some 26 x 1.9" Hutchinson Acrobats on my rain bike, and they are pretty darn brutal for being so big. Next time I'm getting Schwalbes for it.

I've also had fairly good luck with this:

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...&category=2120

It's not perfect, but it's definitely worth a few bucks.
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Old 12-27-07, 03:17 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
If you want easy on and off, you do not want the combination on my Bianchi: Campagnolo Omega rims with Continental tires. I carry three steel tire levers -- I cannot get by with two, as with every other bike I have ever owned, and aluminum and plastic levers are out of the question. In contrast, I never even carry tire levers with my mountain bike.

Truer words were never spoken.

Although fold-ups make things a LOT better.





Cheers,
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Old 12-27-07, 03:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divineAndbright View Post
Does anyone know of any new tires that for sure will fit good on old rims? By that I mean they are easy to get on and off. I dont know if its just me and have bad luck, but every old rim I have the tires can give you a hernia just trying to get them on, not to mention very hard to prevent puncturing the tube. I remember I got a flat while on a ride once and it took a good 30 minutes just to get the new tire on the rim as I was being so cautious not to wreck my tube. I guess old rims are a mm or two bigger in diameter than new ones, or the rim itself is wider or something, I dont know.

I have a few old michelin tires which go on nicely, but Id rather not use them cause they kinda turned hard with age, so they kinda suck to ride on.
My technique for the the hard to mount tires, has been to use a strong tire iron
and some windex to help slide the tire bead over the rim, and/or some talcom
powder. Once mounted, I make sure to thumb and snap all of the way around
the tire to make sure the tube is up in the tire. I then inflate slowly to around 50 lb's. This helps to set the tube up in the tire. Deflate, Then re-inflate to
suggested pressure.

Of course fold -ups are a little more expensive, but are easier to mount and
are easily stored under the saddle if need be.

OBTW, My Conti's are properly aged and cured. They are 20 yr's old and are
better than new. Lance Armstrong keeps his in a cellar to age properly.

I guess bicycle tires are like fine wine and cheese.



Cheers,
JohnnyBee.
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Old 12-27-07, 04:38 PM   #14
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ever tried mounting tufo tubular clincher tires? i wont do that again even if someone pays me. ugh.
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