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Old 05-30-08, 03:33 PM   #1
soonerbills
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To T-MAR and others of FUJI interest!

T-MAR or those of interest,

A while ago you responded to a poster on the componants and quality of a mid 80's Fuji.
I have some questions respective of a 12 speed Fuji Allegro that I own.
The bike is marked " Fuji VALITE Touring" on the top bar. "Fuji ALLEGRO"
on the down tube.

Below is the last comments you made on that thread:

" Based on the serial number, the OP's bicycle was made September 1984. That's late enough in the year that it could possibly a 1985 model.
However, I specs for a 1985 Fuji Allegro which is quite similar, with the same derailleurs, crankset, brakes and wheel set. It even uses Valite 414! It would appear that the Sagres may have replaced the Berkley, so maybe yours is a late 1984 model. Regardless, it is close enough that their prices and placement should be similar. The 1985 Sagres cost $229 US and would have been considered an entry level, sports/touring model.
The 1985 Sagres used hi-tensile forks but Valite stays. It's only speculation, but maybe the difference between the Berkley and Sagres was an upgrade to Valite stays?"

Here is a link to the original thread
http://tinyurl.com/44xysv

T-MAR
Here is my bike's #
JK501284

First off I see you say that the Sagres and the Allegro are "quite similar" and that the bikes use Valite 414 on the stays and the forks are Hi Tensile. On my Allegro Valite is specified though not as to the a grade such as 414. On the forks, there are stickers indicating Valite. Does this mean the forks are Valite? the forks have "Suntour" stamped or forged into the axle mounts.
As well so does the rear frame dropouts.
I see that Fuji offered "Double" or "Quad" Butted design for these bike yet mine is marked " Triple Butted" where in the hierachy does this fall as far as quality

Now this bike (which I assume) is totally original is equipped with the following:

- Suntour ARx derailleurs front and rear.
- Sugino GP 170mm cranks (aluminum arms, steel rings).
- Sugino seat post
- Sansin sealed hubs fitted with quick release front & rear
- Ukai 27" alumimum rims with galvanized spokes.
- Dia-Compe sidepull brakes
- Nitto stem with Qlympiade short drop bars
- Suntour Power shifters: stem mounted

Can you advise as the level this bike would have been in the catalog?
And finally what is the difference between the Suntour AR and ARX deraillers?
I have put a few miles on this bike. When I bought it recently it was a twice ridden and then forgotten bike. After some rehabbing I find it a nice bike though I wonder what the "Touring" capability will really be and may upgrade some components.

You help is appreciated
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Old 05-30-08, 09:06 PM   #2
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A lot of views but no posts....
Hmmm
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Old 05-30-08, 09:08 PM   #3
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must be my breath
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Old 05-30-08, 09:11 PM   #4
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Again!! I don't know where the video keeps coming from...GRRR
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Old 05-30-08, 09:12 PM   #5
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Sounds like yours is a step or two above entry level. Fuji's entry level was quite respectable by the way. I think you may have to wait for T-Mar to get more definitive.
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Old 05-30-08, 09:44 PM   #6
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I can't speak specifically to your model, but I can attest to the overall quality of Fujis, and the touring capability of even the entry-level models. I have a 1977 S10-S, which has the stock Suntour Vx derailleurs, a pair of salvaged Dia-Compe center-pull brakes, and alloy cranks and wheels. As I recall, the S10-S was near or at entry-level when introduced. I am not gentle with this machine. I carry school books, groceries, and the like over typically bad urban streets, and the bike just keeps going. I wouldn't think twice about loading it up and going for a century, or whatever. Although I have made one change by putting 700c wheels with 38mm tires on it. It's even better now!
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Old 05-30-08, 10:00 PM   #7
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I can't get enough Fuji's.

What we really need is one catalog from each year like the Schwinn boys (and girls) have.
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Old 05-31-08, 05:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soonerbills View Post
After some rehabbing I find it a nice bike though I wonder what the "Touring" capability will really be and may upgrade some components.
IMO, the tourability of the bike is 100% determined by the frame, so long as you are willing to upgrade components.

My hunch (just a hunch) is that the geometry is just fine. I would guess that it's 73 parallel, 45cm stays and a 5.5 fork. There are instructions on how to measure a frame on the Bike Geometry Project page. Once you have the geometry, you can do 2 things. First, you can compare it to other bikes that have been traditionally used for touring. Second, you can submit the information to the BGP!!

http://home.comcast.net/~pinnah/dirt...y-project.html

The other issue of the frame will be the material. Valite will be lighter than HiTen. The more the better. Straight gauge or DB for touring can be argued either way. Straight gauge will be a bit stiffer and will deal with heavy luggage better.
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Old 06-03-08, 06:00 PM   #9
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The serial number indicates the OP's frame was built in November 1985 and therefore should be a 1986 model. The closest year for which I have line-up info is 1985, at which time this model was 2nd from the bottom of the line. It probably occupied a similar position in 1986.

Whether or not the bicycle is suitable for touring depends on your definition of touring. Most entry level models have sports/touring geometry which is a compromise between racing and grand touring geometry. The geometry is probably mangeable even if the head angle is slightly steeper and the rake, wheelbase and wheelbase are shorter. It will ride a bit harsher and require more concentration to keep on track, especially if the load is heavy, with some being carried on the front end.

If your touring is to be done with heavy loads and/or in hilly terrain, I have a few of component concerns. First is the gearing. Grand Touring models typically have very low gearing to allow carrying loads up hills. Typically they run a triple crankset with about a 28T granny and a low gear around 27". While the Allegro came with a relatively large 30T cog, in combination with the 42T chainring your low gear is only about 38" and this may be a bit of a struggle.

My second concern is the braking. Heavy loads tax the brakes, especially on descents. Most touring bicycles use cantilever brakes which provide more power and use extra large pads. Fitting cantilevers is impractical, so I'd be looking for a good set of very large pads. Kool Stop V-brake pads for ATBs should work and be much better than your current set-up. You may even want to consider beefier calipers.

Finally, I'd be concerned about my shifting set-up. On a heavily loaded bicycle, especially one with slightly less stable geometry, it can be daunting to take one's hand off the bar to execute a shift. This is why bar end shifters were so common on Grand Touring models. While brifters are commonly derided in this forum, they are an even better option, though they are a much more expensive and would also require a rear derailleur and freewheel upgrade for indexing compatibility.

Lesser concern would be the lack of frame fittings. Undoubtedly you will have to use clamps to carry a suitable complement of water bottles. Also, since there are no specific eyelets for racks, you will have to use clamps. These are suceptible to shifting under heavy loads, so ensure they are properly secured.

Most Grand Touring models use 40 spoke rear wheels. If your loads are heavy, you may experience spoke breakage, particularly on the frewheel flange. I suggest you some extra spokes of the proper lengths, along with the necessary tools to remove the freewheel.

As for the derailleurs, the AR was less expensive and heavier than the ARX.

Last edited by T-Mar; 06-03-08 at 06:04 PM.
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