Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Fuji Touring Series V - newb needs advice

    Hello all, welcome to my first post. Please enjoy the complimentary cheese tray.

    I went car-free about 2 years ago with a hybrid. This summer I'm trying a road bike for the first time after a family friend sold me a Fuji Touring Series V on the cheap to get a feel for them. I'm hooked, don't have the money to spend and wanna get on something a little less rickety.

    I've read this is actually a pretty good frame. Its' like-new and fits me great. Could this bike be modernized on the cheap w/ newer used components? How much might it sell for? Could there be enough interest in the right vintage circles to barter it + cash for a new ride?

    Say anything & everything that comes to mind... this is my first post and I'll hear all the advice I can cram into it

    Thanks a mint!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What's the problem with it? I'm not completely familiar with the Series V, but if it's like the other bikes in the Series, it should be a very good bike.

    Oh, welcome to C&V, and... mmmm, cheese.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like to keep old bikes as original as possible, especially when the original parts are working well. Take your "new" bike to a good shop for a tune-up and a check-up. Odds are, you can get it running like new for very little money.

    I have a touring bike that was made in about 1982 that shifts as well and brakes as well as a typical 2008 bike selling for $1,000 to $2,000...and the only "new" parts are the tires and inner tubes.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As an all-purpose commuter I'd get rid of the bar-end shifters, gear it differently, get some sturdier tires, better wheels, new cables/covers and lighten it up however I can afford.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SanChoe View Post
    As an all-purpose commuter I'd get rid of the bar-end shifters, gear it differently, get some sturdier tires, better wheels, new cables/covers and lighten it up however I can afford.
    Maybe I'm missing something. Bar-ends are a great tool for touring or commuting. Touring gearing works well for commuting too. Nothing this side of a tandem wheelset is beefier than a touring wheelset. People use touring bikes for commuting because the bikes are so well-suited to the task. So now I'm really not getting what you mean by "rickety."

  6. #6
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    northern California
    My Bikes
    Bruce Gordon BLT, Cannondale parts bike, Ecodyne recumbent trike, Counterpoint Opus 2, miyata 1000
    Posts
    5,605
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sheldon Brown (RIP) has a lot to say about Japanese, Fuji, and touring bikes. Check his web site. I still have a damaged Miyata 1000 from that period that rode as well as my current Bruce Gordon. Unfortunately it was not as sturdy.
    This space open

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Right... rickety was a poor choice of words. It rides new pavement like silk, but I need to gear it for more speed in the open (maybe gears aren't stock? it tops out too easily). Also, maybe just a comfort thing, but wider handlebars & brake shifters is worth the bit of off-road I need to do. It just seems generally heavy relative to the new, more expensive bikes... I'm not a pro, just going on my gut.

    It is all original components, spare spokes and all. Hasn't been ridden much, but could probably use a good tune up and cleaning.

    Aren't there better wheels available? I never thought to ask...
    Last edited by SanChoe; 07-02-08 at 10:56 PM.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually, Sheldon Brown's page was one of the first resources I found in a blind internet search. He taught me just about all I know about it!

  9. #9
    Senior Member fender1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Berwyn PA
    My Bikes
    I hate bikes!
    Posts
    4,401
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Touring Series IV is a nice bike. It can be upgraded and it would be a worthwhile upgrade IMHO. That said, for commuting I would stick with friction shifting/bar ends. Wheels can be swapped for 700c which will allow you to run a wider tire for additional stability off road. If you make the wheel change, you will need to (more than likely) get a new set of brakes that allows additional room for adjustment as the 700c wheels are 4mm smaller in diameter that the current 27" wheels.

    Regarding the gearing. I beleive it is a 6 speed freewheel. You should be able to add a 7 speeed free wheel and maybe add a large chainring(s) up front to increase your high gear without much trouble. If you go the brifter route, you will need new derailleurs, brifters, new rear wheel, cassette etc. (Lots of $$$) You will also need to have the rear of the bike cold set (spread) to accept the 8/9/10 speed cassete. It is 130mm and is wider than the current 126mm spaced original wheel.

    The bike would probably fetch about $300 or so on ebay if it is in good shape. A new Surly Long Haul Trucker Touring bike is about a $1000 which has all of the features you are looking for.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sage advice Fender. I spent about an hour and a half with a local bike shop owner this morning and he gave exactly the same advice.

    I'm gonna run with it. Wider handlebars, gravel-worthy tires and a bigger front ring should turn this thing into a pretty awesome budget get-arounder (and classy without screaming 'steal me'). It'll be the perfect thing to tide me over until I can afford a new-fangled Cyclocross (which I fell in love with on first ride).

    Any more advice on how to go about these changes on said budget wouldn't go amiss, but I'll probably throw myself at the mercy of a bike shop so I know its' done right.

    Thanks so much for the help folks! I'm feeling good about this ride, can't wait to get on it when all is said and done.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can "top out" the standard gearing? The older touring bikes I've seen "topped out" at about 100 gear inches. Eddie Merkx set the "Hour" record at 95 gear inches.

    Most commuters move along briskly at a cadence of 85 RPM or 90 RPM using 65 gear inches to 75 gear inches...I don't know anyone who commutes using 100 gear inches as their "commuting" gear.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kansai
    Posts
    1,693
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it feels rickety/unstable, make sure your headset, bottom bracket and hub bearings are all adjusted correctly. A little play in any of those can make a bike feel loose/unstable, especially headset or hub bearings.

    That is a really good frame, with some cool touring features like built in spoke holder. Kind of sought after, and being well set up, should be a rock solid and stable commuter. Me, I've got a Trek 620 (this is a touring frame from 1985) which is use as a commuter.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •