Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Riding: 1960s Falcon commuter; Queued: 1977 Bob Jackson, 1983 Serotta Club Special, 1984 Motobécane Team Champion, 1983 Guerciotti SLX, 1974 Harding (like Holdsworth Pro), 1974 Peugeot PX10LE, 1970s Jeunet Franche-Comté, 1974 Raleigh International
    Posts
    3,009
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How do bike manufacturers ship bikes

    I posted about my Miyata 912 that had a fork blade bent in shipment. FedEx is denying the claim (it was insured) on the grounds that it was not properly packaged. The bike shop that packed and shipped the bike says that they've shipped "100s of bikes" that way, and they don't get damaged. I'm inclined to fault both of them, but I'm trying to figure out where the truch is. Here's the crux of the matter, I think:



    The bike was shipped with the saddle, front wheel, pedals and bars removed; front wheel and bars were nestled together and zip-tied to the left front of the frame, but didn't prevent the right fork blade from being the first thing that made contact when impact crushed the upper left corner in the photo -- must've been exactly in this position. There was no cushioning material in the box (pedals and other stuff in a plastic bag roaming around free in the bottom). While there was a nylon brace between the fork ends, which did not come loose even with the impact, it didn't brace the fork ends either, as a block of wood, screws and washers might have. And the bike itself, with rear wheel in place, and other stuff hanging from one side, was free to move within the box too.

    No matter what the state of packaging, it's clear that, on FedEx's watch, the box took a significant hit. Not only was the fork blade bent, but the brake block on the right side came through the end of the box, and was bent down.

    So what I'd like to know from you with more actual experience of seeing how bikes are typically shipped is: was this a decent packing job, "industry standard," or is it negligent?

    Thanks all,

  2. #2
    www.theheadbadge.com cudak888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Southern Florida
    My Bikes
    http://www.theheadbadge.com
    Posts
    22,730
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Industry standard" borders on negligent, IMO.

    Regardless, I'd say this is below said "industry standards," and I'd definitely call it negligent in my book, regardless of the B.S. so-called standards in place.

    That said, rules of my own which I see violated:

    Under no circumstances should the bike be able to move in the box.
    Under no circumstances should any side of the bike be directly exposed to contact with the inside edge of the box outer walls.
    Under no circumstances should a front fork be shipped facing forward (bare minimum, removal is preferable)
    Under no circumstances should tubing be left sans any covering (even manufactures put some crappy foam over it - ideally, insulation foam should be used)
    Under no circumstances should shifters be left in an upshifted position if left on the frame.
    Under no circumstances should the rear derailer be left on (and considering that shifter, and the tension on the cable, it must be)
    Under no circumstances should the front of the bike be free of any padding that distances the headtube from the outside of the box less then an inch. Padding should be either cardboard, hard foam, or a combination of the two
    Under no circumstances should the bottom bracket be left un-padded, even if the rear wheel is installed. It should be padded against the box to add additional prevention of the bike jostling around.
    Under no circumstances should any loose parts in the box be allowed to shift in any way, shape or form. They should be boxed and affixed to the frame and/or wheels, or if the box padding is dense enough, packed tight in the padding.

    Me? I'd battle FedEx as much as you can, but in a perfect world, I'd have that bike shop paying through it's rear end for this one. I'd also suggest they do many an eBay seller a favor and refuse to pack bikes due to their crappy workmanship.

    -Kurt

    P.S.: If you'll send me the shop name and phone #, I'll gladly give them a piece of my mind (courteously, of course, unless they turn nasty). Packing of this sort is not acceptable and no bike shop should consider this proper.

  3. #3
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    11,896
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Charles,

    Manufacturers ship them the fork turned backwards 180 degrees and some have brake caliper removed. They do use the little block thing as seen in your pic.

    Most manufacturers use a thick piece of cardboard between the fork and box and some will cover the fork ends as well. Back in the it was common to have fork show up with damage.

    If that pictures how the shop packaged your bike they did it wrong. Period.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  4. #4
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    11,896
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
    "Under no circumstances should shifters be left in an upshifted position if left on the frame.
    Under no circumstances should the rear derailer be left on (and considering that shifter, and the tension on the cable, it must be).
    Kurt,

    Excellent rules which go beyond what manufacturers do.

    Back in my shop days all rear derailleurs were left on the bike and shifted into the biggest cog. To this day I package my bikes the same way.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  5. #5
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Riding: 1960s Falcon commuter; Queued: 1977 Bob Jackson, 1983 Serotta Club Special, 1984 Motobécane Team Champion, 1983 Guerciotti SLX, 1974 Harding (like Holdsworth Pro), 1974 Peugeot PX10LE, 1970s Jeunet Franche-Comté, 1974 Raleigh International
    Posts
    3,009
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To turn the fork backwards, one would need to remove the whole front caliper, correct? Not that it shouldn't have been done -- when I've shipped, I've removed fork, wrapped in its own cardboard, and fastened to the end of the box. I wouldn't expect a bike mfgr. to do that, but turning the fork around makes eminent sense.

  6. #6
    N+1 redxj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    My Bikes
    A few
    Posts
    1,307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bikes from the factory come with the rear tire in the frame, front wheel zip tied to the frame on the non-drive side, all frame parts covered with cardboard/bubblewrap/paper/etc., dropout saver in fork, handlebar and stem removed, skewers removed, no pedals, and seat and seatpost removed. The new bikes come with the skewers, pedals, reflectors, manuals, and rest of the front brake parts in a small box. They also have plastic inserts that go into the wheels to protect the hubs and another that goes around the dropouts to protect the derailleur. When I pack a bike (and I do often) I do most of the same things. I will always shift the rear derailleur to the biggest cog in the rear and the smallest up front so the derailleurs and chain are towards the center of the bike.

    That picture is horrible packing. They didn't put anything on any part of the frame? The cranks are left freely to move. Normally I will zip tie the drive side to the chain stay and wedge the wheel into the non drive side crank. I work at a bike shop and of the new bikes we receive I would say a very small percentage is damaged in shipping (say 1 or 2 per 200 or so). But, the majority of the bikes arrive by freight carrier and not UPS/Fed ex. Our big bike orders all come freight with single special orders arriving UPS/Fedex. I don't think I have seen a damaged one come from Fedex/UPS yet.

    Is the rest of the bike in decent shape? I would get the bike shop to pay for something if Fedex won't. Depending on how bad the fork is it can be straightened pretty close to original by a decent bike shop with the proper fork tools.

    Tomorrow at work I will snap a pic of a bike as I unpack it. I will post those pics up tomorrow to show what a properly packed bike should look like.

  7. #7
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    11,896
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
    To turn the fork backwards, one would need to remove the whole front caliper, correct? Not that it shouldn't have been done -- when I've shipped, I've removed fork, wrapped in its own cardboard, and fastened to the end of the box. I wouldn't expect a bike mfgr. to do that, but turning the fork around makes eminent sense.
    Correct, in most cases the caliper would need to be removed. I leave the fork in place because it doesnt save any space by removing it and I like my bikes to in 'home assembly' condition when they arrive.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  8. #8
    www.theheadbadge.com cudak888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Southern Florida
    My Bikes
    http://www.theheadbadge.com
    Posts
    22,730
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by miamijim View Post
    Correct, in most cases the caliper would need to be removed.
    And if it was, and one did not wish to disconnect the cable, it can be opened to max setting and tie-wrapped over the frame - provided the frame has already been wrapped with thick foam wrap. Three layers of bubble wrap then go over the secured caliper. Not the best way, but it works.

    -Kurt

  9. #9
    Don't be a "Drew" Muttleyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    594
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You guys are freaking me out now. My '88 Wheaties Paramount is getting ready to be shipped and I am worried enough as it is and now I read this, great.

    Freak'n out in Ft. Worth
    Mutt

  10. #10
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The NC Mountains
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, all vintage
    Posts
    19,531
    Mentioned
    65 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I put a claim on ebay for poor packing very similar to what you show. The seller placed the bike frame (no wheels) loose in the box, handlebars disconnected loose as well. No packing materials, no bubble wrap, nothing. Frame and bars rattled around all the way from Seattle to Greenville, SC. I settled with the seller.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,213
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A few pictures of a bike I received. Beneath all of that foam,cardboard, etc. is a 1963 Legnano Roma Olimpiade, shipped from Quebec to SoCal.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
    To turn the fork backwards, one would need to remove the whole front caliper, correct? Not that it shouldn't have been done -- when I've shipped, I've removed fork, wrapped in its own cardboard, and fastened to the end of the box. I wouldn't expect a bike mfgr. to do that, but turning the fork around makes eminent sense.
    exactly what i expect. every bike i have gotten has had the fork wrapped seperately

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can appreciate your distress after seeing the condition of your Miyata, Charles, as I am planning to ship my bike by one of the big carriers after packing by a LBS. I also share Muttleyone's anxiousness as well and wonder who to trust? Has anyone had any experience flying their bike with them as luggage, and if so, how did you handle it? Any suggestions for reasonably priced sturdy cases, are they considered luggage, etc.? Your helpful details would be greatly appreciated.
    Laddie

  14. #14
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Riding: 1960s Falcon commuter; Queued: 1977 Bob Jackson, 1983 Serotta Club Special, 1984 Motobécane Team Champion, 1983 Guerciotti SLX, 1974 Harding (like Holdsworth Pro), 1974 Peugeot PX10LE, 1970s Jeunet Franche-Comté, 1974 Raleigh International
    Posts
    3,009
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In their rejection letter, FedEx refers to their FedEx Service Guide. It does not address bicycles anyplace specifically, but their packaging guidelines, as you might expect, recommend packaging everything like it's an unexploded bomb. In my conversation with FedEx, when the agent was reiterating that the packaging was not done to their standards, I asked what policies FedEx has for their employees regarding the appropriate handling of packages, and limits on the abuse they could be subjected to. According to the agent, FedEx does not have a handling policy that I could refer to.

    When I have shipped frames, I go more the route of the posts above by retyred and cudak888, than the "bike industry standard" referenced by miamijim. If you're going to ship your own bike, then I would strongly urge you to package it yourself, rather than have someone do it who's only doing it for money. Plastic foam pipe insulation, two nested boxes, and nylon strapping and 2" wide packaging tapes are all you need; zip ties are a plus, but I've used tapes instead.

    Read the posts above, and you'll see what has to be removed: stem + bars, pedals, seat + seatpost. If it's not too much trouble, remove the fork, but if you don't want the hassle of reinstallation/adjustment, you can turn the fork around backwards (remove front brake caliper). Block any dropouts that don't have a wheel in them. I've used wood blocks of the proper length with big sheet metal screws and huge washers driven into the ends (pad the washers and screws where they contact the dropouts). Protect derailers, and adjust them as recommended above.

    You know what the tender points are: anything that sticks out and would take the brunt of an impact. You can generally get bike boxes from a bike shop; here they tend to throw them away on a certain day of the week. If you are patient, you can get one that fits inside another, with the inner one large enough to hold your bike. Pad the spaces between outer and inner boxes with something.

    Make sure that all the flaps and corners of the box are taped securely, and can't rack around. A box that doesn't provide resistance to twisting isn't giving all the protection it could. The stiffer it can be made, the better.
    Last edited by Charles Wahl; 10-18-08 at 11:07 AM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,213
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My condolences re your damaged Miyata. Hopefully the bike shop will offer to pay for all damages. One would think that a shop that unpacks bikes would know how to reverse the process. I recently received a vintage PX10 from Cleveland packed by the seller and the workmanship (wrong choice of words) rivaled your Miyata bike shop job. My seller had never shipped a bike and I had to coach him a bit. Still a sub standard packing job but the Peugeot arrived undamaged. Of my three vintage Legnanos shipped from Quebec via Fedex, one arrived with noticeable damage to the box. Only the excellent packing prevented the bike from sustaining damage. Once again I sincerely hope that the bike shop steps up and does the right thing.

  16. #16
    Senior Member sonatageek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cleveland,Ohio
    Posts
    2,709
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just shipped a bike that I was originally going to just drop at a bike shop and have them pack it up and ship it out. Then I remembered that the last time I did that, the bike arrived with a bit of damage. It was a older bike with a tank and head light and the lens of the light got broken.

    I got two boxes from a bike shop, took off the pedals, both wheels, turned the handle bars back and zip tied them in place. Zip tied the bike to a cardboard sheet from the other box (so it is suspended within the box), put cardboard between the frame and the wheels and then used the long sides of the smaller box to come up inside the box, over the top and tuck down the other side.

    Even with all of that I worry about Fedex treating it like a Samsonite suitcase in the Gorilla cage like in the old tv commercials.

    The best packing job I ever did was when I shipped my Zunow frame to a fellow BF member. Foam on everything, added cardboard supports within the box all nicely taped and zip-tied into place. Quote from his email after it arrived -- 'It could have been helicopter dropped and still been fine.'

  17. #17
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    11,896
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
    And if it was, and one did not wish to disconnect the cable, it can be opened to max setting and tie-wrapped over the frame - provided the frame has already been wrapped with thick foam wrap. Three layers of bubble wrap then go over the secured caliper. Not the best way, but it works.

    -Kurt
    Exactly. I zip tie them to a padded top tube.

    Quote Originally Posted by 86se7en View Post
    exactly what i expect. every bike i have gotten has had the fork wrapped seperately
    I disagree. Removing a fork, while better in theory, is an UNREASONABLE expectation. If a bike is packaged properly there's no reason to remove it.

    The next thing you know shippers will get 'zinged' for packaging even though there's no damage to the fork simply because they choose not to remove it.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Too bad about your bike...let us know the outcome. For reference, below is a Legnano I had shipped from Poland.





  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    9,997
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    First off, there is no such thing as industry standard when it comes to packaging bicycles. Practices vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and even within manufacturers, depending on the cost of the bicycle. They are in the business fo profit. Extra packaging and protection costs, so they are reluctant to do it. In general, manufacturers are willing to take a small risk and loss on transit damage if it is offest by savings in packing.

    In this particular case, while the packing leaves some things to be desired, one has to consider what would have been required to prevent the fork damage? Is it beyond normal expectations and practices? Packaging is meant to meant to protect the product during normal handling, but not abusive handling. Based on your description, the box took an obvious impact in transit. Would turning the fork backwards or an extra layer of cardboard or foam have prevented the damage?

    If the fork is bent to the point where the metal has actually wrinkled or buckled, the impact was very heavy and it is unlikly that extra packaging would have prevented the damage. In such as case, I would be going after FedEx.

    If the forks blades are bent, but not there is no buckling or winkling of the metal (or even the paint), extra packaging may have prevented it, but it is arguable. Regardless, in such a case you should be able to get the fork straightened at a good LBS for relatively little cost.

  20. #20
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Riding: 1960s Falcon commuter; Queued: 1977 Bob Jackson, 1983 Serotta Club Special, 1984 Motobécane Team Champion, 1983 Guerciotti SLX, 1974 Harding (like Holdsworth Pro), 1974 Peugeot PX10LE, 1970s Jeunet Franche-Comté, 1974 Raleigh International
    Posts
    3,009
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
    Based on your description, the box took an obvious impact in transit. Would turning the fork backwards or an extra layer of cardboard or foam have prevented the damage?
    It's pretty clear to me that turning the fork around would have prevented the damage. For one thing, the fork end would not have been in the corner of the box that got slammed. and also, the possible points of contact would have been mid-fork-blade and head tube -- less leverage to bend than having force applied on a single fork end from the front. If fork had been turned around and box slammed on the bottom, where the fork ends were resting, that force would have been more or less axial, and the fork would not be so vulnerable.

    Quote Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
    If the fork is bent to the point where the metal has actually wrinkled or buckled, the impact was very heavy and it is unlikly that extra packaging would have prevented the damage. In such as case, I would be going after FedEx.
    Here's the bend -- paint is cracked on the leading edge of fork just below the crown, and there's almost a kink in the trailing edge.



    As I said, I fault shipper for not doing the most basic protection -- bike was free to roam a few inches back and forth in the box, and fork was vulnerable -- and I fault FedEx for abusing the box to the degree that serious damage resulted.

    It was not really my intention to find out how bike enthusiasts pack their treasure for shipping, but to establish the basic threshold of acceptable practice for manufacturers/shops. To me its fairly evident, from responses by miamijim and redxj, that anyone who ships bikes professionally should be expected take basic steps to protect the fork.
    Last edited by Charles Wahl; 10-19-08 at 10:31 AM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8,316
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would bet money that the seller who had the bike packed up at a local bike shop, got the bike back in a box, and it was taped, never assessed the packaging job, if they had, they would have probably had a question or two right then.

    Seller subcontracted to the shop, seller's problem.

    Regarding turning the fork and front brake, always turned around, and if the caliper is left on, protection on the downtube to protect the frame, often a layer of cardboard (two ply type, one outside ply left off) wrapped around the fork legs as a sleeve.

    Ditto on the rear, shifted to the largest cog, still some got hit back then but, not very often.

    Most common damage back in the 70's was to the top of the seat lug, sometimes a cable drifted above and got hit, the Japanese started putting plugs in with flanges to help. Raleigh never figured it out. Almost all manufacturers tied things up so the whole bike would insert and remove as a unit. Some put the saddle, pedals and front skewer in a sub box nested above the rear wheel. Many variations, with the same goal.

    I wonder on modern threadless forks how is the front end held together currently while knocked down? Anyone know?

  22. #22
    Senior Member RobbieTunes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    15,282
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    I can't speak for all bike packers, having learned a couple of hard lessons myself.
    However, for the purposes of this thread, in C&V.
    1-Kurt is right spanking on.
    2-If you're shipping to a bike person, find out if they can assemble. If so, disassemble.
    3-If you are getting paid to get a pristine bike to an owner, pack it so, and pay for it.
    4-If you are not, do the best you can, as if you were shipping it to yourself.
    5-Do not depend on any shipper to accept blame, even if they destroy the box. They won't.

    Receiving bikes, try to take the time to open the bike in the presence of the delivery guy. They really don't like that, but turning it over to the OS&D person prevents the claim process. They may take it back from you, and gladly pay a small repair fee in lieu of sending the whole bike back.

    If it gets to the claims department, then you're pretty much screwed, because they'll blame others.

    I only know that on collectible bikes, I've only really sent two, and I packed them with 100% prevention in mind, barring collisions. It was expensive, it took a long time and a lot of packing and tape, but both recipients were 100% pleased. I know they had a mess on their hands, but the bikes were OK, and one was to Australia.

    It's just a part of this business, I guess.

    Robbie ♪♫♪...☻

    Perhaps you didn't really hear what you thought I said...
    ...or maybe you did, and that's why you're so mad.


    1982 Lotus Classique
    1986 De Rosa Professional SLX
    1987 D'Arienzo (Basso) SLX
    1995 Hot Tubes TT
    1998 Kestrel KM 40 Airfoil
    2006 Cinelli XLR8R-2
    2011 Eddy Merckx EMX3
    2014 Wraith Hustle

  23. #23
    Disraeli Gears Charles Wahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Riding: 1960s Falcon commuter; Queued: 1977 Bob Jackson, 1983 Serotta Club Special, 1984 Motobécane Team Champion, 1983 Guerciotti SLX, 1974 Harding (like Holdsworth Pro), 1974 Peugeot PX10LE, 1970s Jeunet Franche-Comté, 1974 Raleigh International
    Posts
    3,009
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The situation at hand does not involve a seller. My family owns this bike, and my parents asked if I wanted it. To make it easy, I called a bike shop local to them and asked if they'd pack and ship; no problem -- until it got bent. All my parents did was drop the bike off, bike shop did the rest, for which they were paid what they asked, no haggling.

    Poor judgment on my part for assuming that a bike shop didn't need any specific instructions on how to pack a bike, or what my expectations were. I'm not going to name the bike shop, unless I get stiffed by both bike shop and FedEx refusing to take responsibility, which I think they share jointly. I've already told FedEx that if they won't make good on their insurance, then they'll lose me as a customer, permanently, for shipping of any sort, correspondence or freight, business or personal. It's hard for me to believe that they would prefer to lose a customer, rather than pay a lousy $160 for a new fork (which I believe would be cheaper than having the fork professionally repaired/repainted to match) -- it's not that much.
    Last edited by Charles Wahl; 10-19-08 at 03:47 PM.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Marrock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,921
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by texraid View Post
    That is a work of art.
    "Engineering! It's like math, but louder."

  25. #25
    www.theheadbadge.com cudak888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Southern Florida
    My Bikes
    http://www.theheadbadge.com
    Posts
    22,730
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
    (which I believe would be cheaper than having the fork professionally repaired/repainted to match) -- it's not that much.
    From what I can see, it does not need to be repainted. It looks as if it can be straightened quite easily too.

    I'd offer to do the job, but I only have the Park fork jig - not the FFS-1 leverage tool - though I can buy this one: http://cgi.ebay.com/PARK-TOOL-FFS-1-...QQcmdZViewItem

    -Kurt

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •